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PostPosted: Sun May 17, 2020 11:46 pm 
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Hello everyone,

I am a "pure sailor", having sailed multihulls from HC14 to HC 16, monohulls such as 420/470 dinghies, and owned a quarter-toner cruiser-racer (Farr 727). I am fond of camping-sailing and hence very interested in buying a Tandem Island for it seems to be the perfect boat for my program, and my wife likes it (she is not into sailing)
I plan to sail in salt waters, with winds regularly between 10 and 20 knots and waves (fetch) around 1 m + (French Polynesia). Good thing : water temperature between 24 -28 ° C (tropical seas). I am wondering how this boat behave in such conditions. I have also tried a Weta trimaran which is perfect to sail in those conditions : the only drawback is the lack of storage volume (and very wet)...
I thank in advance any AI/TI owner who will share its experience regarding offsshore sailing with 10 to 20 knot-strong winds.


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 6:29 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2014 6:43 am
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Location: Chalfont Pa
Thats a lot to expect of the boat. They are light, and carry minimal momentum in waves and with that sort of wind the boat will be slightly overpowered. Good news is that you can reef, but then again the waves will hurt.
IMHO it will be a wet bouncy ride upwind. On a reach, when you can surf it will be a blast. But it could be a wet ride all the time.
Bottom line, try one and see. Wish I had those issues, right now in Pennsylvania the winds are pretty good but water still cold.


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 7:12 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
Posts: 2717
Location: High Point, NC
You cannot compare the AI/TI to a Weta. Completely different boats other than both being very wet rides.

The AI/TI is unique in its ability to furl the sail on the fly. A nice feature. It is not nearly as fast nor performance oriented as the Weta however and you can't expect it to sail like one. But the Mirage Drive offers some abilities not found in other sailboats.

But in the conditions you mention, you are going to get wet - very wet. Nature of the beast.


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 7:24 am 
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The TI is a blast at around 15 knots. A lot of fun pushing its limits while still within a good margin of safety.

At 20+ knots it begins to become somewhat overwhelmed. An experienced sailor in good physical condition can handle it, but those with less experience or not in good physical shape are taking a risk. With heavy wind/waves and incorrect technique, there is a risk of capsizing. Reefing the sail and steering the boat in heavy winds and pitching waves requires good technique, decent strength, and confidence. Not much room for error as things can happen quickly. Not for the fainthearted.

Anything over 25 knots is dangerous to all, not recommended.

However, if you ever find yourself far from shore in dangerous wind and waves, which has happened to me several times, I simply furl the sail completely and use a motor to return to shore. Without the sail, the TI with its amas is quite stable even in such conditions. You'll get wet for sure, but you'll make it back ok. This is why I recommend to everyone sailing in potentially dangerous conditions more than a mile away from shore to have a motor as a backup if/when the weather becomes overwhelming.


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 1:41 pm 
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Hi. Thanks for all your answers.

I clearly understand that the TI is not at all as performance-oriented as the Weta. I have tried the Weta in such weather conditions (wind around 15 knots) and it was a blast : very wet (but I did not expect it to be dry) but that was not an issue. I found it remarkably seaworthy as long as I was not pushing it to the limits. By the way these limits seemed much further than those of the beach cats I usually sail, and pushing a boat to its limits is no longer my usual way of sailing (I'm getting too old for that !).
I am wondering if the TI is as seaworthy as the Weta but also robust enough to sail in the "open sea" (not just flat lagoons). Being wet is clearly not an issue here, but versatility is a major advantage (quiet family day-trip, spear-fishing, fishing, camping...).
Anyhow, 20-knot winds are MY limit.

The TI is on my short list alongside the Hobie Getaway and the Weta trimaran (a used one is available here at a really fair price).


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 2:19 pm 
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The ability to furl the main sail instantly is also very appealling for we often experience suden squalls.
Apart from the seaworthyness, I really hope the TI is robust and reliable (I don't want to spend too much time fixing broken things).

Any further feedback regarding this boat will be much appreciated.

Thank you again.


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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 2:28 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 3:13 pm
Posts: 483
The TI is indeed robust and reliable. In my experience, I've had no major issues within five years and hundreds of hours in all kinds of conditions. Not to say it's unbreakable, infallible, and perfect, but it is tough and well designed. You won't be disappointed there. If anything does happen, Hobie is usually great at standing behind their products.

It is robust enough to sail offshore for short hauls as long as you have adequate safety measures in place, have proper sailing experience, are very careful, and don't push its limits. I wouldn't recommend this to just anyone, only to experienced sailors who know and accept the risks.

That said, it's not really designed for true offshore sailing. Personally, I would not sail it offshore without a backup motor to get out of tough situations.


Last edited by pro10is on Wed Jun 17, 2020 4:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 11:24 pm 
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@post10is

Thank you very much for your feedback. I plan to use it mostly "inshore" (lagoon) or offshore but in that case always with a motorboat as a guardian angel !!! The idea of a back-up engine is duely noted.

My ultimate goal would be to participate in the Tahiti Pearl Regatta where small boats such as beach cats, small tris, and even traditional Polynesian sail canoes (something similar to the Hawaiian canoes but with 2 outriggers instead of one, and a sail)... are allowed to compete alongside cruisers but as long as they are accompanied by a safety motorboat. Quite challenging with 2 passages between islands... and a huge preparation.

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJLReQyc64g

If you have any tips in order to upgrade that boat, I am all ears !


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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 5:35 pm 
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Hello everyone,

Just tested a Tandem Island (pre 2015) this morning and I am a bit disappointed.
Sure it's a hell of a kayak, with plenty of storage, the ability to sail and peddle, quite comfortable and very stable. In fact it is perfect to "cruise" from point A to point B assuming you want / have to do something once in B (fishing, camping, etc...) or just enjoy sightseeing. But I wouldn't be spending 2 hours just sailing around like I usually do on a beach cat : I clearly missed the speed and responsiveness of "pure" sailboats.
My top list has just been narrowed to 2 choices : Hobie Getaway or Weta trimaran.

Dear AI/TI owners, thank you again for all your answers : you sure have a great boat which unfortunately does not match with my sailing program.


Last edited by Semper Fi on Wed May 20, 2020 8:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 6:46 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 3:13 pm
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Semper Fi wrote:
Hello everyone,

Just tested a Tandem Island (pre 2015) this morning and I am a bit disappointed.
Sure it's a hell of a kayak, with plenty of storage, the ability to sail and peddle, quite comfortable and very stable. In fact it is perfect to "cruise" from point A to point B assuming you want / have to do something once in B (fishing, camping, etc...) or just enjoy sightseeing. But I wouldn't be spending 2 hours just sailing around like I usually do on a beach cat : I clearly missed the speed and responsiveness of "pure" sailboats.
My top list has just been narrowed to 2 choices : Hobie Getaway or Weta trimaran.

Dear AI/TI owners, thank you again for all your answers : you sure have a great boat which unfortunately does match with my sailing program.

I hope you find what works best for you. Best of luck! Let us know what you finally select.


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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 7:20 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 10:20 pm
Posts: 272
Location: South Boardman, Mi
If you can find one used the H21 Sport Cruise is a fantastic sail camping boat. It handles rough weather, it is relatively dry, it has dry storage, a large cooler, cup holders in the wings and an optional tent. Also consider a F-24 trimaran.


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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 8:31 pm 
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speed633 wrote:
If you can find one used the H21 Sport Cruise is a fantastic sail camping boat. It handles rough weather, it is relatively dry, it has dry storage, a large cooler, cup holders in the wings and an optional tent. Also consider a F-24 trimaran.


F24 is way out of my range (too big, too expensive). The HC 21 SC would be perfect but there are none available here (nor any F24 by the way), meaning I have to find a used one abroad (most likely in the US - even though it would be far easier for me to buy one in France) and have her shipped by sea.

I'll keep you posted :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2020 1:29 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2011 8:59 am
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Location: Cleveland, OH
CE CLASS A yachts are designed for large sea voyages (everywhere), in which wind force may exceed 8 on the scale of BEAUFORT and waves can also exceed a significant height of 4 meters. These yachts are designed largely to be self-sufficient.

CE CLASS B yachts are designed to travel off the coast (200 miles or less) in which the winds can be up to force 8 (not exceeding) and waves can reach a height up to 4 meters (not exceeding).

CE CLASS C boats are designed for travel close to the coasts and in large bays, estuaries, lakes and rivers in which winds can be up to force 6 (not exceeding) and waves may reach a height of 2 meters (not exceeding).

CE CLASS D boats are designed for cruises in protected waters, like small lakes, rivers and canals in which the winds can be up to force 4 and waves can reach a height up to 0.30 meter (less than 1 foot).

A Hobie TI is a CLASS D vessel. Using it in the conditions described is beyond its designed safe capabilities.

That said, TI's have undertaken epic voyages in big conditions- but its risky and you should know the risks. You should harden the boat and make sure you have survival gear & a plan in case you lose the boat.


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