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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:12 pm 
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Hey folks,

Just wanted to hear opinions on whether folks thought that the papaya or the seagrass had better visibility across all light and water conditions.

My reasons for eliminating red is that it is hard to see in low light conditions. Slate and camo are just plain hard to see and dune is hard to see if there is froth or white caps.

I spend a lot of time on the Willamette river in Portland and there are a ton of pleasure boaters in the summer (in varying degrees of intoxication of course). My 2011 Outback is papaya which was the best choice back then but I am planning on getting a 2019 and thus I am raising the question.

Any input (anecdotal is fine) is appreciated.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:26 pm 
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I would stick with the papaya. Hard to miss it and its the only color that looks good enough to eat :D


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:13 pm 
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Location: Escondido
pdxfisher wrote:

...there are a ton of pleasure boaters in the summer (in varying degrees of intoxication of course). My 2011 Outback is papaya which was the best choice back then but I am planning on getting a 2019 and thus I am raising the question.

Any input (anecdotal is fine) is appreciated.
Regardless of color, if another boater isn't looking where he is going, there are a couple of other things you can do to get his attention.

1. Daytime strobe on a pole helps in low light and fog, can catch an eye looking the other way.

2. An airhorn lets you communicate with the boater without him even seeing you. Even if he's blind (unless he is deaf too), it WILL get his attention. Here are some common signals for anyone interested. https://www.boaterexam.com/navigationru ... g-off.aspx
Even for someone who doesn't know the protocol, the loud noise works anyway!

For a highly visible color, I agree with jeffreydc -- papaya. 8)


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:50 pm 
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I've got a Papaya and was just told that I stick out like a sore thumb on the lake I was on. Another friend was able to see me out on the lake as he was passing by on the freeway.

Kevin


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:06 pm 
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Seagrass is getting close to the most visible color in low light. Papaya would be my choice for daytime. Pick a color that goes well with your wardrobe. 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 11:16 am 
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Thanks for the input folks! I definitely feel like the papaya color of my 2011 is pretty easy to see and if the seagrass was not offered I would easily pick it. Sounds like most folks things papaya is a bit more visible than seagrass - at least during the day. Likely I will try to get a papaya but if there is a seagrass in stock (and not a papaya) I may just take that. Ideally, I will get to see both colors next to each other and will be able to make a decision.

Roadrunner, I have an all-round white boat light on a pole that I use in low light conditions and I always run a bright fluorescent flag. I had not considered a strobe, I wonder if that is annoying to have on. I don't want to give someone a seizure.

Pounce, I am not sure which color goes best with my eyes :) I also agree that seagrass may be a bit more visible under low light but probably a bit less visible in the middle of the day.

Thanks again for the input, I think in the end both colors have some benefit and I will make the decision based on availability.

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Fish tremble when they hear my name :)

A ship in harbor is safe -- but that is not what ships are built for.
--John A. Shedd, Salt from My Attic, 1928


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:40 pm 
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pdxfisher wrote:
I had not considered a strobe, I wonder if that is annoying to have on. I don't want to give someone a seizure.
I think it would be annoying if you left it on all the time. It might work best with a remote switch so it would be available on demand. 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:26 pm 
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Location: Portland, OR
I think I understand RR, you mean turn it on when a boat nears but leave it off at other times. That makes sense. I was thinking how horrible it would be to have something flashing while fishing. I guess a handheld would work about as well. I could hold it up as needed.

I think my all-round white light is pretty good, but if it had a blinking mode I agree that would be even better. I think with the 2019 I could mount it on the rear H-rail and reach it pretty easily.

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Fish tremble when they hear my name :)

A ship in harbor is safe -- but that is not what ships are built for.
--John A. Shedd, Salt from My Attic, 1928


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:55 pm 
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Hobie makes a flag/light combo. Railblaza has a nice visibility kit with mount.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2018 11:09 am 
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Seagrass or Papaya. Low light advantage probably goes slightly to Seagrass. Papaya probably has a little advantage if you're in a swampy or grassy area with lots of natural plant life. Red is pretty good. Dune, Slate -- probably suboptimal if visibility is a priority. Camo, well, pretty apparent how that one goes.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2018 11:58 am 
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If your point is to be seen, I couldn’t say between your two choices.

If your worry is to be found, best bet is to carry a compliment of lights, air horn (small air blaster fits in 8” hatch easy, upright in the deep 8” bucket), whistles, marine safety gear, flares, EPIRB, VHF (and your buddy’s too), UHF is also popular on fresh water, cell phones and chargers, etc.

The list is long to pass a US Coast Guard inspection, the above is only partial. And, for you naysayers, it does become ridiculous when you think you don’t need it.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 10:11 am 
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Thanks for all the input. I was trying to decide between yellow and seagrass, but they do not make the yellow anymore. I did not realize that papaya is an orange color. So I decided to go with seagrass.

Zen, I agree that there are many things in addition to color of the kayak for safety. However, since the biggest thing on the water with me is the kayak I want the color of it to be as visible as possible.

Presently in my 2011 outback, I carry a whistle on my vest and I have an air horn in my crate (which I will move to the rectangular hatch of the 2019). If I am fishing the Willamette river (large river with lots of commercial and pleasure traffic) I bring my VHF and I always have my cell phone. Additionally, I have a flag and if I am going out early or late I have an all-round white boat light. I agree that I would rather be safe than sorry.

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Fish tremble when they hear my name :)

A ship in harbor is safe -- but that is not what ships are built for.
--John A. Shedd, Salt from My Attic, 1928


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 6:42 pm 
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Location: KLXT
Seagrass is a pretty loud color. Good choice. Here is my recently acquired Revo 16 in the same color. The second pic gives you a little idea of how the color stands out vs. water.

A couple of other interesting factoids about the seagrass color. Internal corporate studies found that owners of seagrass kayaks were found to be 10% more attractive than owners of other color boats, as well as scoring 12% higher on intelligence tests. People who fished from seagrass Hobies, on average, caught 8% more fish. The color also is reputed to add half a mile per hour of hull speed. :P


Image


Image


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 8:29 am 
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It is sort of chartruse which is highly visible on the water. Go for it. Safety.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 2:51 pm 
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Hey Syncro, that is great to hear. I checked the mirror though and I guess the attractiveness takes a while to kick in :)

Snook1, I agree with you about the color being really visible.

The following is discussing the human eye's sensitivity to colors:

(https://www.ndeed.org/EducationResource ... sponse.htm)

"The three curves in the figure above shows the normalized response of an average human eye to various amounts of ambient light. The shift in sensitivity occurs because two types of photoreceptors called cones and rods are responsible for the eye's response to light. The curve on the right shows the eye's response under normal lighting conditions and this is called the photopic response. The cones respond to light under these conditions.

As mentioned previously, cones are composed of three different photo pigments that enable color perception. This curve peaks at 555 nanometers, which means that under normal lighting conditions, the eye is most sensitive to a yellowish-green color. When the light levels drop to near total darkness, the response of the eye changes significantly as shown by the scotopic response curve on the left. At this level of light, the rods are most active and the human eye is more sensitive to the light present, and less sensitive to the range of color. Rods are highly sensitive to light but are comprised of a single photo pigment, which accounts for the loss in ability to discriminate color. At this very low light level, sensitivity to blue, violet, and ultraviolet is increased, but sensitivity to yellow and red is reduced. The heavier curve in the middle represents the eye's response at the ambient light level found in a typical inspection booth. This curve peaks at 550 nanometers, which means the eye is most sensitive to yellowish-green color at this light level. Fluorescent penetrant inspection materials are designed to fluoresce at around 550 nanometers to produce optimal sensitivity under dim lighting conditions."

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Fish tremble when they hear my name :)

A ship in harbor is safe -- but that is not what ships are built for.
--John A. Shedd, Salt from My Attic, 1928


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