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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2018 5:09 pm 
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RBack wrote:
WAVERIDER wrote:
Good vid, shows just how well the revo 16 cuts through the water.

As you have the 2015 model just wondering if you ever had any issues with leaks through the rear wiring grommet in the tankwell? This was moved to the bulkhead in later models


It does indeed move well through the wet.
I hold a steady pace of 8,5 km/h (5,3 miles/h or 4,6 knots) in average and that's with a convenient, relaxed level of effort.
Not bad by a hull that also is very stable in the water and has a confident feel to it.

I have the 2016 model with the wiring grommet up on the bulkhead.
Got it in the summer of 2016 and thus it would perhaps be more proper to say I've had it for two and a half summer rather than three :)
But it is the third summer anyway.
It has been out in rough seas with considerate spray and lots of water in the tankwell, in the well underneath the seat and water pounding the hatches.
I think I drained out about one or two litres (0.25 - 0.5 gallons) of water after an hour of constant waves over the hull, but that seems fair enough.


Love mine. First one was a 2015 which was swapped over to a 2016 as a warranty issue with that grommet placement issue. I actually paddle mine now a lot of the time (with a few mods), which opens up a whole new skill set. Paddling I can top out at 9km/hr with a fast cruise of 7.5km/h over one hour with no tide or wind influence. Pedalling like you 8.5 is maintainable once your fitness is up, with it topping out just over 10. Best advantage over the other models is when you are heading into the elements

After each trip it is good to give the seat venturi drain a good flush otherwise you end up sitting on a big bath of water slopping about if it gets clogged with debris.

The revo 16 is practically a non seller here in Australia compared to the other models. Dont know why as its the only hobie I would have, and it is the only one that gives a real kayak feel. Makes my old quest feel like a bathtub in comparison.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 2:55 am 
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[quote="WAVERIDER"
Love mine. First one was a 2015 which was swapped over to a 2016 as a warranty issue with that grommet placement issue. I actually paddle mine now a lot of the time (with a few mods), which opens up a whole new skill set. Paddling I can top out at 9km/hr with a fast cruise of 7.5km/h over one hour with no tide or wind influence. Pedalling like you 8.5 is maintainable once your fitness is up, with it topping out just over 10. Best advantage over the other models is when you are heading into the elements

After each trip it is good to give the seat venturi drain a good flush otherwise you end up sitting on a big bath of water slopping about if it gets clogged with debris.

The revo 16 is practically a non seller here in Australia compared to the other models. Dont know why as its the only hobie I would have, and it is the only one that gives a real kayak feel. Makes my old quest feel like a bathtub in comparison.[/quote]

I would badly need to paddle more. My arms are getting weaker by the minute. Used to be racing with bikes (bicycle) and a couple of years ago I went more over to recumbents (I own a velomobile) meaning that the arms are just hanging lazily holding the stearing sticks while I sit relaxed in my seat letting the legs work. I do the same on the Revo. On a traditional race bike there is at least some work needed by the arms when standing up in climbs or during various rushes. Even when sitting on the saddle the arms need some amount of endurance.

Yes, I've had my share of buttock bath due to debris. The reminder to flush/clean it often comes when being out at sea :)

Perhaps the Revo 16 starts competing with the AI and potential Revo buyers take the step "up"?
If I would have another Hobie - or a second one - It would be one of the Island versions. However for the moment the Revo 16 fits me perfectly and I have never even considered that I should have chosen one of the smaller models.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:10 am 
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RBack wrote:
[quote="WAVERIDER"

I would badly need to paddle more. My arms are getting weaker by the minute. Used to be racing with bikes (bicycle) and a couple of years ago I went more over to recumbents (I own a velomobile) meaning that the arms are just hanging lazily holding the stearing sticks while I sit relaxed in my seat letting the legs work. I do the same on the Revo. On a traditional race bike there is at least some work needed by the arms when standing up in climbs or during various rushes. Even when sitting on the saddle the arms need some amount of endurance.

Yes, I've had my share of buttock bath due to debris. The reminder to flush/clean it often comes when being out at sea :)

Perhaps the Revo 16 starts competing with the AI and potential Revo buyers take the step "up"?
If I would have another Hobie - or a second one - It would be one of the Island versions. However for the moment the Revo 16 fits me perfectly and I have never even considered that I should have chosen one of the smaller models.


I also ride a recumbent, and the Hobie was a natural fit. You peddle in a recumbent position and even though the motion is not exactly the same, my "bent" muscles were developed well enough to peddle without much fatigue from the first ride. Paddling on the other hand requires me to get my upper body back into shape.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2019 11:01 am 
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It's a pity the GoPro kind of underexaggerates the waves a bit (between 1:50 and 2:50).
And I did perhaps not film the biggest and most entertaining waves either.
I'm still amazed of how well this thing behaves in rough seas. A pure joy - also this summer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_AaWZqlkls&t=171s


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 2019 11:32 pm 
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Nice vid.

Just a suggestion add hobie revo 16 to the video title, that way folks will be able to find the vid when they do a search


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 5:17 am 
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The Hobie Revo 16 is an awesome touring boat! It tracks well, is fast and handles rough water with ease. My regular boat is a fiberglass sea kayak and I've mostly relegated that to skill sessions and use the Hobie for touring instead. That said it is worth pointing out a few issues that I have run into:

1. The Hobie is heavy, and loaded up with kit, really heavy! The scupper cart is great, but it is a pain to get the boat onto it.. basically make sure you do that before you load up any kit. When paddling solo this is actually the biggest problem I run into. I can easily get my boat down to the water on the cart and then get it off the cart, but now I have a dilemma. Off the cart, the fully loaded kayak is almost impossible to move around on land so I need to get at least some of it in the water and up on some foam blocks to protect the transducer. Now I have to leave it there and go take my cart back to the car and hope the boat doesn't float away. If I'm lucky there is something I can tie a bow line to, but more often than not I just have to run fast :) The same applies when landing somewhere, without the cart, it is really hard to pull the boat up the beach, especially if I need to protect the transducer which means using blocks underneath.

2. Floating seaweed is the nemesis of the Mirage Drive! Seriously it is terrible! I'm just talking about seaweed floating on the surface, not on the seabed in shallow water or such. The worst part is that it is actually quite hard to notice the drive is fouled, it doesn't impact paddling much, however I can see it instantly on my gps as I will lose a knot on average. So basically anytime my speed drops down I have to stop and pull up the drive and remove the seaweed. It only takes a second, but it is not fun to do in rough water.

3. The sailing kit is a lot of fun but it's not going to replace peddling in most cases. I find that on a reach I can get a knot or two out of the sail, but I am still peddling, just not as hard. Although the energy I would be using peddling is now being spent on trying to stop the boat keeling over :) I could also just suck at sailing though.

My rig: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1UAEz1myEA


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 10:37 pm 
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The Adventure / Revolution 16 is definitely one of Hobie's masterpieces! It's the fastest, smoothest riding kayak that Hobie makes -- great boat!
mulefire wrote:
The scupper cart is great, but it is a pain to get the boat onto it.. basically make sure you do that before you load up any kit. When paddling solo this is actually the biggest problem I run into. I can easily get my boat down to the water on the cart and then get it off the cart, but now I have a dilemma. Off the cart, the fully loaded kayak is almost impossible to move around on land so I need to get at least some of it in the water and up on some foam blocks to protect the transducer. Now I have to leave it there and go take my cart back to the car and hope the boat doesn't float away. If I'm lucky there is something I can tie a bow line to, but more often than not I just have to run fast :) The same applies when landing somewhere, without the cart, it is really hard to pull the boat up the beach, especially if I need to protect the transducer which means using blocks underneath.
There is always an easy way to do things. If you cart the boat before unloading from your vehicle, it's easy. Once on the water, why not take it with you? You can put it in your cargo well:
Image

Foredeck:
Image

Or front hatch:
Image

When you come ashore, it reinserts easily (with a little practice):
Image

And makes a great parking brake:
Image

Seaweed can be a nuiscence sometimes with the rudder as well as the Drive. It's not a perfect world.

The sailing will get better!
Image
8)


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2019 5:06 pm 
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Thank you so much for all the tips and tricks! I'll have to do some experiments with my cart and seeing if I can just strap it onto the front or such. I have the big trax one with the inflatable wheels and it is something of a beast. The inflatable wheels make it really hard to get it down under the water to pop it into the scupper holes. Maybe I just need a different cart.

The sailing suggestions make a list of sense. I can feel more power on a close reach than on a broad reach which seemed counterintuitive. I'll have to experiment with a boom or such. I used to do a lot of windsurfing many years ago and all my sailing muscle memory comes from that. I don't know if that is helping or hurting to be honest.

Thanks again!


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2019 7:43 pm 
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mulefire wrote:
I have the big trax one with the inflatable wheels and it is something of a beast. The inflatable wheels make it really hard to get it down under the water to pop it into the scupper holes. Maybe I just need a different cart.
When inserting trax (or any high volume) wheels, try removing the far wheel to help control the cart under water. Also, most of the newer carts have very long legs to accommodate the Pro Angler. for the Revo 16, you can shorten the legs and still have plenty to poke through the hull. With shorter legs you don't have to reach so far under the boat to insert the cart. My earlier stock Hobie cart has 9" of metal leg (not including the caps) above the cross bar and fits everything easily except the PA. -- on the Revo 16, there is room to spare.

BTW, the basic cart can handle any of the kayaks, including the AI. I've even used it with the TI for short distances. Simple and durable. It's NOT the greatest in soft sand, however. The new Fold and Stow cart is nice -- stows easily in the front hatch and quick to reassemble. 8)


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2019 12:43 am 
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re getting a fully loaded revo 16 on scupper cart. Firstly you can cut down the post height as the revo is much lower than say PA for which the cart is also meant to fit. Just as long as the posts project out the top of the scupper. You can drill a hole in the ends and use a lynch pin (which I tie to the back of the seat so I dont loose it when not in use) to stop it falling out as you have removed the integral pin.

Install a handle on the back of the bulkhead behind the seat. That way you can lift it fully loaded with one hand on that handle and one one hand on the stern handle, or even open the back hatch and hold the hatch rim. As you lift the back, drop to one knee and rest the back of the boat on your thigh. The shortened cart can now easily be slipped into place without having to unload, or tip it on its side


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2020 1:01 pm 
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Some rather low quality slow motion video footage of the Revo 16 moving through water.



And some other compilations of footage where nothing really happens...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUYQLq53jDU&t


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2020 2:38 pm 
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RBack wrote:
Some rather low quality slow motion video footage of the Revo 16 moving through water.
Great actin -- thanks for sharing! 8)


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