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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 3:43 pm 
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I have a used Hobie Sport I recently bought. Was all excited it fit inside my Saturn Vue but was parked on an incline and cracked the windshield of the Vue badly when it slid back and I slid it forward. Whoops! A little over $300.00 for the replacement windshield I could have spent on installing rails on top (This Saturn 2007 did not come with rails) and a kayak rack.

What are suggestions for easy loading of the kayak on top of the SUV? I think the kayak weighs about 70 lbs. I see there are several alternative systems to purchase that make loading easier. What do you favor?


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2018 8:09 am 
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Cheapest way, foam kayak racks for cross bars. Sherpa roller, about $35. They suction on to back window and you just lift front of the kayak up then lift from the back to roll kayak across top. Highly recommend left and right tie-downs to stop kayak from any movement in addition. I had to stop several times on the way back last time because the main two straps weren't enough in higher winds. I have J brackets too but mostly use when I need to transport 2 kayaks.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 02, 2018 2:07 pm 
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Section10 wrote:
Cheapest way, foam kayak racks for cross bars. Sherpa roller, about $35. They suction on to back window and you just lift front of the kayak up then lift from the back to roll kayak across top. Highly recommend left and right tie-downs to stop kayak from any movement in addition. I had to stop several times on the way back last time because the main two straps weren't enough in higher winds. I have J brackets too but mostly use when I need to transport 2 kayaks.


Thank you for your reply! Wow yeah that Sherpack roller looks like the cat's meow and not very costly! My vehicle is Saturn Vue 2007 and has more of a flat rear window/back end. I assume it will work for that also?

Image

Any particular brand you prefer for the the foam kayak racks. I see Malone even makes one that is inflatable.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 02, 2018 7:08 pm 
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Some folks gave ideas at
https://www.hobie.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=60392
which included the afore mentioned Sherpak roller. Can also find lots of ideas on other sites with a web search.

I studied many of them but in the end I use a "modified" clean& jerk onto a tall SUV with factory racks. Its the fastest way but requires some muscle although technique is more important than muscle power and only works with rigid flat cross bars (no foam or J-cradles). If you get hard cross bars then try it but easier seen than described. The hard part is flip the kayak up with arms, legs and torso combined (not just arms alone) so it lands upside down at an angle with low edge supported by shoulder (away from car) with arm cocked in tight and edge closer to car is supported partly by head and other arm more extended. If you can do that then its easy to extend arm closest to car (since other arm and shoulder support most of the load) so edge of kayak just reaches the front cross bar edge. Then its easy to slide back edge on and front further on the cross bar since the load is now supported partly by car & shoulder. After that a step stool helps slide it on fully and tie down. Do not lift kayak above head with 2 arms extended as that is too much strain. I'm an old man and not very strong but it works for me, maybe cause I've been doing all my life and have the technique down and I know right curse words which also helps when it feels too difficult.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 6:43 pm 
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Location: Missoula, Montana
I used to load my kayak onto the roof rack of my SUV by putting a towel on the rear wind deflector, setting the bow of my kayak onto the towel, sliding the kayak forward onto the roof rack, flipping the kayak upside down on my padded roof rack, and strapping it down. But I got a new SUV which has a rear wind deflector which is too flimsy to support a kayak. So now up put a towel on the side of my SUV between the roof rack, and use it to protect the side of my vehicle when I slide my kayak onto the roof rack. For an explanation and pictures, see http://www.northwestkayakanglers.com/in ... #msg204958 .


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 5:12 am 
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Thank you gentlemen. Some good ideas!

As far as the clean and jerk I am certainly capable as I'm in really good shape for 60, but as I get older I don't want to take the chance of doing anything to my back. So far no back issues and I want to keep it that way.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 2:53 pm 
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I second the side load method as being the safest way to load a kayak. As a seven year owner of a oasis tandem I tried a number of methods before adopting this approach, which allows me to load and unload without relying on assistance from anyone. I am now 61 years young and twenty years post back surgery so the least labor intensive method was always my goal. I opted for the Thule Waterslide pad for the protection of my vehicle, a little pricey but works well. It has a rubber backing that keeps it in place along with straps I have never used. I also load directly from my Hobie cart (make sure you remove the retainer pin). Place the bow on your pad between the bars of your rack and walk yourself back to the stern handle. You can then slide your kayak up on your vehicle with the cart just falling aside. The bonus of using your cart is that your kayak never makes contact with the ground during loading process. Offloading is reverse of the loading process except that the cart is secured in place after shifting the kayak perpendicular to your vehicle. You then offload the kayak until your cart makes contact with the ground while maintaining your bow safely on the pad on your car. I have 60 inch cross bars which don't allow the kayak to slide to either side. Thought I would add my two cents since I have singlehandedly loaded/offloaded my kayak countless times using this method without harm to my kayak, SUV or myself.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2018 5:16 am 
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bjfrick1 wrote:
I second the side load method as being the safest way to load a kayak. As a seven year owner of a oasis tandem I tried a number of methods before adopting this approach, which allows me to load and unload without relying on assistance from anyone. I am now 61 years young and twenty years post back surgery so the least labor intensive method was always my goal. I opted for the Thule Waterslide pad for the protection of my vehicle, a little pricey but works well. It has a rubber backing that keeps it in place along with straps I have never used. I also load directly from my Hobie cart (make sure you remove the retainer pin). Place the bow on your pad between the bars of your rack and walk yourself back to the stern handle. You can then slide your kayak up on your vehicle with the cart just falling aside. The bonus of using your cart is that your kayak never makes contact with the ground during loading process. Offloading is reverse of the loading process except that the cart is secured in place after shifting the kayak perpendicular to your vehicle. You then offload the kayak until your cart makes contact with the ground while maintaining your bow safely on the pad on your car. I have 60 inch cross bars which don't allow the kayak to slide to either side. Thought I would add my two cents since I have singlehandedly loaded/offloaded my kayak countless times using this method without harm to my kayak, SUV or myself.


Thank you!


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2018 2:05 pm 
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It looks hillbilly silly, but it does work for side loading onto my Honda Accord Rhino Rack (yea I know) ~ big I think 3" pool noodle tucked under front and rear bars on one side, extra length to form a bow laying over the roof/window side. It should be a tight fit, may even have to loosen the bars a bit then tighten back.

Flip yak on grass bottom up, lift front of yak and scoot it over to sit on the pool noodle. The rest is easy, just take your time so you don't bang up the car. With the front 1/4 or 1/3 resting on the pool noodle, pick up the back and slide over bars. A little practice and it works well both loading and unloading solo. I use one ratchet strap front and one rear. I'll try to post a pic if I can figure out how.

A word of caution when carrying on a smaller vehicle; if you have a lift type tailgate or trunk, be especially careful swinging them open - you can hit the back or rudder of your yak. These new cars don't like bagging into kayaks abruptly with a sharp edge... don't ask how I know.


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