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 Post subject: Re: Abrasion mitigation
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:07 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2907
Location: Escondido
FatBear wrote:
We towed in a large buoy in that someone had hit and broken. We put the anchors in the milk crate behind my seat and towed the buoy on its own mooring line. Worked well: the milk crate held the line high enough to avoid the rudder controls. MAN was that a workout! It was a pretty good sized buoy that caused a lot of drag. It was about a 1.5 mile pedal tow. I pedaled and paddled, both, and actually got some good aerobic exercise. Just wanted to see if we could pull it off, and we did. :)
Great job on the buoy! They can be difficult, especially with anchors attached.
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The front seat is available on Wednesday if you'd like a new and different experience than you are probably used to. Same offer to anyone else who is interested. Message me if you are interested.
Thanks, but I have a previous commitment. The good news is, here's a small sample of what others have picked up at the lake. Think about all the stuff you don't have to collect! BTW, what you see in the first pic is all in the front seat of a tandem Oasis -- the passenger apparently had to swim. The guy reportedly had some difficulty navigating from the back seat. :wink:
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Do you carry yours right side up then?
No. I push them of right side up and then flip them when onboard, as the pics above show. 8)


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 Post subject: Re: Abrasion mitigation
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 1:08 pm 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2012 7:55 pm
Posts: 19
Those are awesome loads and I'm very thankful I don't need to bring that all back! Otherwise I would. Mostly it's apples-to-oranges though. It looks like it must have been one of those big kayak cleanup events. We're out there four or five times a week doing more of a slow, thorough, deep cleaning. This morning we started our third trash can full of line and litter. We pedal out to our work area and then work for 1.5 to 3 hours, then either pedal around for exercise or pedal straight back to the launch beach. Sometimes we quit picking line and trash because we've spent enough time for one day, sometimes we do it because our bag and the milk crate are full. And when the lake rises in the winter we will start all over again. We will probably never be finished, but that just means we'll never run out of a reason to get out on the water.

What most people do not understand until they actually are out there with us is that the "work" part of the day is one of the most pleasant parts. We spend that 1.5 to 3 hours with the fins locked up and paddling along the shore as slowly as it is possible to go. We are usually less than 5' from the shore. It is meditative, zen, therapeutic, almost hypnotic. Completely unlike any other boating I've done. (I have 17,000+ miles in rowing shells and kept a canoe on top of my truck for ten years once so I could use it any time I got the itch.) It is completely unlike cruising along the shoreline just 5' farther out. Even pulling a tangle of line from a bush requires focus and forces all of the other cares and concerns out of your brain.

We see many birds and other wildlife up very close. We almost had a curious coyote climb right into the boat with us - he was about 2' away and still coming slowly towards us when I backed out a couple of feet. We're surrounded by them all the time in our neighborhood, but when have you sat there and looked into their eyes from 5-6 feet away for two or three minutes? Very cool. We're learning the territorial boundaries of the Great Blue herons around the lake. We have plenty of time to observe things like this and that enriches the experience. We've had ducks actually compete with us like we were one of them as we "dabbled" along the shoreline, racing to get ahead of us, cut across our bow, and search for the good food before we could get there. I almost bonked one on the head with my paddle as it passed between us and the shore just 2' away.

That's really what I'm offering. You are a way more skilled and experienced kayaker than we are and I appreciate the advice. (We used the wheels again today.) There's no doubt about that. I just thought you or someone else might be interested in something new and unusual.


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