Return to Hobie.com
Hobie Forums
It is currently Sun Mar 24, 2019 3:17 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 3:37 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2018 8:41 pm
Posts: 7
I am going to be in the market for a new Hobie soon. I am debating on getting a Revo 16, Revo 13, or possibly a used 2018 or older Outback or PA14. I am not sure on the stability of the Revos, I currently use a Tarpon 160i (old version) and have no issues with the stability in it and I love the speed when fishing offshore. Is the Revo 16 similar in terms of stability? Is the Revo 13 more or less stable than the 16?

I fish a lot, and from late Spring until Fall I fish almost exclusively offshore out to around 6 miles. I have thought about a used PA14 since they are going so cheap but in Florida we have to haul the kayak through the sand and I am kind of scared with how much the PA weighs. The outback is only on the potential list since so many of the older versions are selling very cheap and rigged already. I already have a compass and I use it mostly inshore. I mainly use my Tarpon 160 offshore, it is a speed machine, which makes me think I would like a Revo, just not sure if how they are in relation to stability compared to the Tarpon. I am comfortable in the Tarpon and fish it alot, but it is about as tippy as I would be comfortable in.

So any recommendations? Thanks for any suggestions


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 5:39 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
Posts: 2633
Location: High Point, NC
Stability runs both ways. Boats that tend to be stable on flat water tend to be unstable in heavy chop and swell. Conversely, boats that are less stable on flat water tend to be more stable in the same heavy chop and swell. Kind of like the stability between a 4x8 sheet of plywood and a log. Imagine both on flat water, and then on rolling water, and how each will act in each situation.

So for mostly flat water, the PA, Outback, etc., are very stable. On rougher water I'd rather be in a Revolution, 13 or 16.

The Revo 16 is faster than the Tarpon 160. Stability seems about the same to me and the addition of the Mirage Drive gives the Revo a large advantage, in my opinion.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:42 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:49 pm
Posts: 6
Since you have experience with the Tarpon offshore, the Revo 16 would be a good choice for you. I have spent many hours fishing out of a Revo 13 both inshore and offshore and never found stability to be an issue. When getting to your fishing spot quickly is a priority the Revo is the best choice.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 4:51 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Wed May 11, 2016 1:27 am
Posts: 389
The revo 16 has a unique advantage in that you can drop a dagger board in for extra primary stability as required. I do that when at anchor or drifting, reduces the "twitch" when you are focused doing other things. Also helps in really bumpy conditions. I use a shorter DIY version as the hobie one is meant for sailing purposes. Helps track better, without limiting manoeuvrability if you decide to have a go at paddling. Pull it out when not needed so its not adding drag.

If you are happy with the tarpon then any other hobie will feel like a barge.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:50 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2014 6:01 am
Posts: 210
Location: Orlando!
Sounds like you’re real happy with your tarpon for all the reasons that make a tarpon 16.

Agree with above that you won’t be happy in any other hobie ‘cause a dirty little secret is they’re all slugs except for the adventure (revo 16.) And as mentioned you’ve got the skeg for added stability, though you might lose some initially because I’m pretty sure you sit lower in the tarpon.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 6:14 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2017 8:55 pm
Posts: 80
Location: Cedar Key, FL
Are you guys calling my beloved Outback a slug?! :lol:

I've been tracking my trips in the Outback for a while now and anything much above 5 knots is slamming into the limitations of the hull.

With the sail, good wind and peddling vigorously you can get above 6 knots but it becomes real clear that it's wasted effort.

For me, the Outback is perfectly fine because I'm comfortable sailing it in moderately bad conditions and since I don't live where I keep my boat, I want the widest usage envelope for the best odds of getting out on the water on those weekends get out to Cedar Key. I understand that the Revo can take rough seas very well when peddling without a sail, but I still think that the Outback has a wider sailing envelope.

Having said that, if you are accustomed to something sleaker that can actually be paddled more than occasionally, then the Outback won't be the right yak for you.

_________________
2014 Outback
2016 Outfitter
2017 Sport


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 5:12 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Wed May 11, 2016 1:27 am
Posts: 389
Pescatoral Pursuit wrote:

Agree with above that you won’t be happy in any other hobie ‘cause a dirty little secret is they’re all slugs except for the adventure (revo 16.)


Then your mates buy STEALTH fibreglass sit on tops and you feel like you are the only one bringing a revo16/adventure bathtub to the party.

Point is it is all relative to what you are used to. Utility vs stability vs hydro dynamic efficiency. You have to pick where that balance point is that suits your requirement and adapt accordingly. One end of the spectrum are the big PAs and at the other racing surf skis. Folks still tip PAs. Cant carry anything on a surf ski, tend to carry too much on a PA

If you practice a lot of falling out and climbing back on then fear of stability dissipates, and your odds of over reacting which often causes the spill in the first place goes away

Following up on one of your original concerns, if have soft sand to regularly deal with then beach wheels are your saviour. Any fully loaded fishing kayak can be quite heavy


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
© Hobie Cat Company. All rights reserved.
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group