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 Post subject: anchoring
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 3:38 pm 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
Posts: 373
Location: Clearwater, FL
After finishing a bottom job (including gelcoat) on my recently acquired "newer" hulls, I decided that I should try to protect the bottoms of the hulls more by using a set of cat trax and using an anchor.

I bought a 3.3 lb folding grapnel anchor and was trying to figure out the best place to connect the anchor line to my H16 when solo raising/lowering the sails, moving the trailer, etc..

I tried connecting the anchor line to the dolphin striker, but the boat wouldn't stay in-line with the wind (probably too close to the center of the boat). Was thinking of putting a "Y" in the anchor line and clipping the two ends of the "Y" to the bow tangs.

Anyone else have any good ideas of how to connect an anchor line temporarily to a H16 (with or without sails up)?

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Tim
84 H16
82 H16
87 H14T
Blue Prism
Sail # 88863
Clearwater, FL
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Last edited by Tim H16 on Thu Sep 13, 2018 5:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 3:47 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
Posts: 12535
Location: Oceanside, California
The anchor bridle is pretty standard for cats, so the "Y" and connected to the bridle wire tangs.

Keep rudders up so it can swing a little.

Understand that cats don't anchor well (Especially the 16 as it's asymmetrical hulls don't like to drift sideways) and it can "sail" up and over the anchor with just the bare mast up.

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Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Warranty and Technical Support
Hobie Cat USA


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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:57 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 3559
Location: Jersey Shore
Skip the anchor.

If you’re really that worried about it, purchase or make a set of foam hull chocks and use them in conjunction with the beach wheels so your boat never touches the ground. There are plenty of racers out there that are super-anal about their hulls and none of them use anchors, they just chock the hulls to keep them off the ground. Much easier than dealing with an anchor.

sm


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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 01, 2015 9:49 am
Posts: 236
Location: Eastern PA
Not sure exactly what you need, but there is one place that I use - it's a boat ramp with no place to pull the boat up onto shore (Hobie Wave). I have an old 25lb plate from a set of weights, with a length of webbing, a float, and a snap hook. I clip it around the mast base and it holds the boat while I park the trailer after launching, and on the way back when I need to get the trailer. I leave it in the water while sailing - like a mini mooring ball :)


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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 7:36 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
Posts: 373
Location: Clearwater, FL
I am able to back my trailer down next to the water's edge, so I tried putting the cat trax under the boat while it was in the water. Not very easy when done solo since the wheels are very buoyant. Sailcraft recommended putting the boat on the sand before trying to put the cat trax under the boat so you can sort of "anchor" one end of the boat in the sand. As you can see from the picture, I probably won't be using the cat trax at the Dunedin Causeway.

Image

Since the beach is pretty flat, I was hoping to minimize dragging the boat much across the shoreline or shallow water since this "sand" is like coarse sandpaper.

The larger Cats that temporarily use anchors here usually have a front crossbar at the bow tips so they just hook their anchor line to the middle of this beam. They also have furling jibs which also helps since the H16 jib can get hung up on the mast and cause the boat to turn/sail when anchored.

With regards to using a "Y" bridle on the anchor line connected to the two bow tangs, I am not sure whether to make the two branches of the "Y" long or short. Should the angle at the crotch of the "Y" be closer to 45, 60, 90, 120 or 180 degrees?

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Tim
84 H16
82 H16
87 H14T
Blue Prism
Sail # 88863
Clearwater, FL
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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2018 1:47 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
Posts: 12535
Location: Oceanside, California
Cat trax in the water.

Place across the bows. Use a set of lines from the ends of the trax running to the forward pylons and back to you.

In deep enough water to force the trax under, hold a bow and use your foot on the wheel and push to roll the wheel towards the forward crossbar while pulling on the line for that side. Repeat from side to side until you work the wheels to where you need them. Tie off at the shrouds with a little stack that allows the wheel to move aft a little while pulling the boat up the beach.

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Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Warranty and Technical Support
Hobie Cat USA


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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2018 9:37 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2017 4:39 pm
Posts: 34
I've tried this on a rocky shore near my boat ramp to hold my boat while I park the trailer and raise the sails.

I made a shoebox size mooring block out of concrete with a steel eye for tying a rope (about 30lbs) total. Then tied 8ft of rope to that with a carabiner at the end to clip at the shackle where the bridle wires meet. Slip a 1ft section of a pool noodle over the rope to act as a buoy. I wade out about 30ft and drop it in waist deep water.

It turns out that the 30lb block isn't enough to hold the boat if there is any wave action. Each time the bows lift, the block skips a few inches. You need a second block tied to the first block to keep it anchored so it doesn't skip. ("Boat" tied to "1st block" tied to "2nd block"). This will hold the boat in place. I haven't tried this in wind over 18mph, but I doubt the boat can drag more than 50lbs when pointing at the wind and everything is uncleated.


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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2018 11:56 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
Posts: 373
Location: Clearwater, FL
A section of chain rode between your mooring block and anchor line will help a lot with wave action. The chain normally lays on the bottom and is lifted with wave action on the boat and lays back down on the bottom after the wave passes (acts like a shock absorber or snubber).

Also, 8' of anchor line is not enough since the angle from the mooring block to the bridles is too steep. Adding 6' of chain rode would help.

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Tim
84 H16
82 H16
87 H14T
Blue Prism
Sail # 88863
Clearwater, FL
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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2018 1:56 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2017 4:39 pm
Posts: 34
Yes, 8ft is short for my mooring line, but any longer and the boat will swing onto the rocks on a leeward shore. I want to keep the boat in shallow water near shore, and in the same spot as much as I can, with little swing arch. You are right that a short piece of very heavy chain could replace the 1st block.

I should also mention the mooring isn’t permanent. I wade out and retrieve the setup when I pack and head home.


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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2018 10:21 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
Posts: 373
Location: Clearwater, FL
My new 3.3 lb folding grapnel anchor is not cutting it, even if I set it with my foot, it still drags.

Does anyone else have a better type of anchor for temporary moorings in coarse sand or silt for a H16?

Guardian Aluminum Fortress G-5 or G-7?

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Tim
84 H16
82 H16
87 H14T
Blue Prism
Sail # 88863
Clearwater, FL
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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 4:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
Posts: 373
Location: Clearwater, FL
Wildwind's Joe Bennett has a good video of solo loading a H16 onto a set of beach wheels while it is in the water. With his type of trolley/cradles, he makes it look easy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ayBq6KtHdU&feature=em-uploademail start at the 4.00 point.

The cradle shape on his trolley closely matches the cross-section of a H16 hull as compared to those for the Cat Trax.

Looks like cradles make it so much easier since they keep the axle from rotating and the friction between the cradles and hulls helps keep it from slipping forward or backwards under the boat.

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Tim
84 H16
82 H16
87 H14T
Blue Prism
Sail # 88863
Clearwater, FL
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 Post subject: Re: anchoring
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 4:48 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 12:26 pm
Posts: 505
Location: Harsens Island, Michigan
I was just going to mention Joe Bennett's videos! They keep their boats moored, and in one of the videos it shows him tying up. They use a short loop of rope tied on the chain plate to keep the carabineer up close to the chain-plate, but keep the carabineer clipped to the bridle wire.

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Steve
1979 Hobie 16 "Orange Crusher"
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