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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:15 am 
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I see Matt Miller uses some kind of loop in the jib halyard rope to connect it with more tension on the mast cleat.
I can not figure out how he worked it out, It looks like he spliced some ropes on the video, but can not figure out how..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4b2NBTpBSQ
He does his magic trick at 1min30s

My setup is the same as in his video: Aussi jib halyard on an "easy" setup (only a cleat on the mast).
I can put myself a little loop in the rope just before jib is totally up, and then go around the cleat, through the loop, and back to the cleat -> problem is that after sailing the loop is hard to release.

Steven


Last edited by roofingbrander on Mon Oct 15, 2018 7:33 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:56 pm 
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Not sure, but you could always use one of these to get a better grip on the halyard.

https://www.mariner-sails.com/clamcleat-tug-cleat.html

sm


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:45 pm 
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What he is doing is creating a 3:1 leverage.
the way you want it set up is this: the halyard runs from the top of the mast to under the cheek cleat, then up to the metal piece that attaches the wire part of the halyard to the rope part of the halyard (sorry I don't know the name of that piece), then the halyard will run down to the cleat.
The video looks confusing because instead of running the end of the rope around the cheek cleat then through the metal piece with a name I don't know, he already had the rope run through the metal piece. This allowed him to simply pull down on the loop of rope and place it under the cheek cleat. Once you try it will make more sense.
Focus on the final set up as described earlier. When you are de-rigging your boat, remember that you don't need to run the end of the halyard through that metal piece, you can just create some slack by pulling down on the halyard, then unhook the rope from under the cheek cleat.

I hope that help. let me know if you want more of a description.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 5:26 am 
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Danny,

So you think he passes back up the mast through a block on top of mast (where jib is connected with mast)
It more looks like he spliced a part of rope to make the loop.

I made a drawing with what it looks like in my opinion, but the version without a slpiced rope
https://www.dropbox.com/s/uj78voy1hvcsj ... 5.jpg?dl=0


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 6:14 am 
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After watching, the video, it is clear, that there is no splice or permanent loop in the halyard (I didn't watch the video before submitting my prior post). The end of the wire section of halyard has a block with becket attached to it. The end of the jib halyard line is tied to the becket and run through the block. When the jib is hoisted to the point that he can reach the block (on the wire halyard), he grabs the halyard line from the block, which forms a loop (one end of the halyard is tied to the becket, the other end is running through the block). This loop is passed over the cheek block on the mast base. This gives him a 3:1 purchase for tightening the halyard. To gain additional purchase on the halyard, he then wraps the free end of the halyard line around the horn cleat to keep it from slipping. Then, with the other hand he pulls the halyard away from the mast (pulling 90 degrees to the axis of the mast), then takes up the slack at the horn cleat and cleats off the line.

It's hard to describe in words, but really, pretty simple in practice. Definitely no loop or splice in the halyard line.

Also, keep in mind that he is demonstrating the jib rigging using the "old" halyard system where the purchase/blocks are down at the mast base. On the new/"aussie" system, all the blocks are up at the mast tang, so there is only a single line coming down the mast.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 2:55 pm 
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Steven,
Your picture is pretty close, but there isnt a knot. Its a metal piece that connects the wire part of the halyard to the rope part.
the description given by srm is very good.
You may have the newer 'aussie' system.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 6:58 am 
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If you are not using the newer Aussie jib halyard system, the jib halyard downhaul block that is used to tension the jib halyard is Hobie Part #11070000. See Page 52, top left corner of the August 2018 version of the Hobie Sailing Parts & Accessories Guide under Hobie H14/H16 Parts Guide.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:39 am 
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I have indeed the aussie system, so all the blocks on the jib part, and no ring/steel wire on mast side (all the rope needs to pass through the blocks before going down on the mast, so no rings or other pieces possible)

So my options for the aussie system on a "easy mast" (with only a cleat) to be able to pull harder:
1- always put a knot/loop when rigging (like on my picture)
2- drill holes in mast to place blocks (race version).

Thanks for the info guys!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 9:14 am 
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Just to clarify, the video you referenced in the original post was NOT the aussie system. It was the original halyard system where all of the purchase is down at the bottom of the mast.

I would be cautious about putting a knot/loop in the halyard when rigging. The jib halyard sees a lot of load when the mainsail is sheeted in and you're probably going to have a hard time un-tying that knot when it's time to de-rig the boat.

With regard to "drill holes in mast to place blocks (race version)," the additional blocks on the race version don't add any additional purchase. They just redirect the halyard line so that it can be lead down the front of the mast but then cleated on the side of the mast for easier adjustment.

Another option would be to add additional blocks to the existing setup (up at the head of the jib) to increase purchase. You would need about an extra 20 feet of halyard for each additional block and it would probably take forever to hoist the jib, but that's the only real option that I can see.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:21 am 
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Quote:
see Matt Miller uses some kind of loop in the jib halyard rope to connect it with more tension on the mast cleat.
I can not figure out how he worked it out, It looks like he spliced some ropes on the video, but can not figure out how..


This is to answer the original question. This is for the older style (not-aussie) Jib halyards.

I have rigged the jib this way for years. It is a time saver.

The answer if fairly easy, but we must first start with thinking of when you bring your jib sail down at the end of the day -
1) Facing rear in front of the mast, uncleat the jib halyard, release just enough line to let the mast ease back (the forestay takes the load off the Jib sail) and hold the halyard with your left hand.
2) With your right hand remove the loop going under the mast cheek block and let go of it. It will recoil through the "halyard block" that is tied at the halyard and the Jib sail will drop about a foot or two. This leaves the halyard going through the block and tied to the becket. It looks a little strange, but leave it in this configuration for next time you rig the boat.

Hoisting the Jib:
1) Pull the jib halyard to raise the jib sail fully, do not pull the mast forward yet.
2) Halyard in your left hand, reach up to the "halyard block" and pinch the line just above where it is tied to the becket. Pull the halyard through the block for about two feet making a large loop. To do this you need to line out with your left hand. Put the bottom of this loop under the mast cheek block, while adjusting the halyard in your left had to keep it in place..
3) With both hands, pull down on the Jib halyard, pulling the mast forward and tie it to the mast cleat.

Once you have done this a couple times, it is quick and easy.

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Last edited by jsloan999 on Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:09 am 
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jsloan999 wrote:
I have rigged the jib this way for years. It is a time saver.

The answer if fairly easy, but we must first start with thinking of when you bring your jib sail down at the end of the day -

.....With your right hand remove the loop going under the mast cheek block and let go of it.....

.....Pull the halyard through the block for about two feet making a large loop... Put the bottom of this loop under the mast cheek block....


As mentioned above, the OP has the "Aussie" halyard system. All of the purchase is up at the hounds. The technique you described is for the "old" halyard system. There is no loop to place around the cheek block on the mast with the Aussie system.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:22 pm 
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Quote:
As mentioned above, the OP has the "Aussie" halyard system. All of the purchase is up at the hounds. The technique you described is for the "old" halyard system. There is no loop to place around the cheek block on the mast with the Aussie system.


Sm - you are correct. I will update my post.

_________________
1979 Hobie (sold)
1983 Hobie 16 Hawiian Sunset (sold)
1981 Hobie 16 Tequilla Sunrise - still own
2008 Hobie 16 (currently sailing the crap out of this boat)
1977 Super Sunfish
Founding member of the "San Dimas Yacht Club"
John


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:32 pm 
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Here are some pictures of the hold halyard/cleat set up with the old style in a photobucket account. If you flip through them there are a few pictures.

http://s1319.photobucket.com/user/jsaut ... .html?o=18

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