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PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2016 9:38 am 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:11 pm
Posts: 306
Location: West Point, Utah
I have had the extenders on my boat for about a decade now and have never had occasion to use them. Even solo I have never had trouble getting the boat on it's feet again. Great to hear of someone else who has read the instructions and gone forward to the bow on the lower hull to allow the boat to windvane and get the bows into the wind. Has worked for me everytime. I finally took the extenders off and I bet now I will have need of them. Murphy's law.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 12:52 pm 
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Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 12:02 am
Posts: 138
Location: London
Rather than employing steel rope for shroud extenders and mast keeper would a synthetic rope suffice such at dyneema with appropriate knots for retaining?

Dyneema as I am sure you all know is very strong.

Cheers.

_________________
Hobie 14 Turbo (~1979)
Hobie 16 Carumba (1983)


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2016 7:53 am 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:11 pm
Posts: 306
Location: West Point, Utah
I finally took my extenders off. After sailing for just short of 8 years with them, and never using them, I took them off and put them in the spare parts bin. I have learned through experience that if the wind is blowing, and it usually is when you go over, that proper technique is all that is needed to right the boat. The same thing goes for water bags and righting poles. I am not a big person at 5'8" and 185 lbs, or young either at 58, but have never had a problem getting the boat on it's feet again. It must be a problem though or all the aids would not have been produced and be so prevalent.
Thinking about it further I suppose that there are at least two factors that need to be in place to be successful. Sealing your mast and then knowing and using the proper technique. Even if you don't seal your mast and turtle, you can right the boat without aids. Maybe if I was a 140 lbs teenager or a 125 lbs female I would be singing a different song. Anyway, just my 2 cents. Have a Hobie day!

PS!! I must be getting old and senile. I already put my 2 cents into this discussion a few weeks ago. So now you all have my 4 cents. Sometimes I crack myself up.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2016 8:57 pm 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sun May 10, 2015 4:51 pm
Posts: 14
mdgann, am I missing anything on technique:
1) Release mainsheet
2) Weather vane so wind is blowing on tramp in the right direction...
3) Lean out as far as possible....
?

My current hulls may be a little on the heavy side compared to newer boats since they are 1980 hulls and one has a small leak. Probably doesn't help.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2016 10:23 pm 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:11 pm
Posts: 306
Location: West Point, Utah
Apri, you've got a great start. Put the righting line over the top of the hull to maximize the leverage and go at it. Just leaning out does not usually do it though. You have to get aggressive and really yank and jerk to get it started. As soon and the main is out of the water the wind will catch it and you should be diving for the upwind hull as it will continue to go over and you will just have to start over again. All fun. The boat will begin to sail immediately also so you need to get up on the tramp and control the tiller asap. Every time is different. Sometimes it comes up right away and others you have to practice a little patience and persistence. Again, all part of the package and worth every minute. As confidence in righting ability grows you will find you are sailing the boat much closer to it's potential and enjoying it more. I know sailors who act like the water is acid and it will absolutely kill them if they go over. It limits their sailing and fun. Have a Hobie day.

PS. as I was re-reading your post, I noticed that you said to windvane to get the wind on the tramp in the right direction. That is not correct. Go to the bow and windvane until the wind is coming right at the bows or a little past. This way the wind will flow under the mast and into the main and help right the boat. Instructions and illustrations are in the manual. This will also give you a little time to get things together before the boat takes off. If it is coming over the beam you will more likely capsize immediately or zoom off out of control because you are still trying to make your way to the tiller.


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