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 Post subject: Upside down
PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 2017 6:53 pm 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 6:48 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Panama City, Fl
So sailing a couple days before Irma came through and ended up floating around upside down in the gulf.

ImageUntitled by Jon Pester

Being a skinny fella I had some issues getting the girl back on her feet. After a visit from the beach police and coast guard we got it back over. But to prevent this from happening in the future I came up with a couple ideas. One I've already put in to action and I'm fairly happy with.

ImageUntitled by Jon Pester, on Flickr

ImageUntitled by Jon Pester, on Flickr

ImageUntitled by Jon Pester, on Flickr

What I'm curious about. Has anybody tried attaching a self inflating life vest to the top of the mast? I don't like the mast Bobs for various reasons. I figure I could mount the fest near the top and have a line run down the mast to pull and inflate it. Any thoughts?


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:31 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2016 4:35 am
Posts: 197
Location: Opelika/Lake Martin, Alabama
Hmm, sounds interesting but then you'd have a life vest hanging and flopping around at the top of the mast.

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Marty
1984 H16 Yellow Nationals, "Yellow Fever"
Lake Martin, 'Bama.


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2017 4:43 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 6:48 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Panama City, Fl
Yeah but I figure having to run in a drop the mast real quick is better than being stuck upside down again.


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:02 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 1:33 pm
Posts: 208
Location: Southern California
I had never thought about using a self-inflating PFD for a float. Good Idea.

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1979 Hobie (sold)
1983 Hobie 16 Hawiian Sunset (sold)
1981 Hobie 16 Tequilla Sunrise - still own
2008 Hobie 16 (currently sailing the crap out of this boat)
1977 Super Sunfish
Founding member of the "San Dimas Yacht Club"
John


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:12 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
Posts: 330
Location: Clearwater, FL
Why not put a Hobie Bob on top of the mast. Hobie Bob will help to keep you from turtling and also helps to keep your mast higher out of the water when up-righting after a capsize or pitchpole.

I sail usually solo in the Gulf of Mexico near Clearwater, FL and the water is not real deep so I don't want the tip of my mast hitting the bottom if I make a mistake. Hobie Bob is an easy and functional assurance.

Image

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Tim
82' H16
Blue Prism
Sail # 88863
Clearwater, FL
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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:47 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2005 10:13 am
Posts: 918
Location: Nepean S.C. Ottawa, Canada
I too, sail in shallow waters, so Hobie Bob was the way to go.

My buddy takes pool noodles, slits them, then slides them over the shrouds, all the way up to the mast.
(Do this when the boat is on its side on the lawn).
Then use cable ties to secure the noodles to the shrouds and the hounds.

Years ago, I would tie a Javex or windshield fluid bottle to the head of the main sail....
anything to induce positive floatation.

Hobie Bob is your answer.

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1989 Hobie SX18 Sail # 1947 "In Theory..."
'Only two things are infinite, the universe, and human stupidity. But I'm not sure about the former.'


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 5:16 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:11 pm
Posts: 306
Location: West Point, Utah
To get a H16 that is turtled up on it's side is simply a matter of getting your weight aft on the hulls til the bows are tits up ^^ then quickly moving to the center again and leaning out. Do that a couple of times and it will be on it's side ready to get the bows into the wind and right as per normal procedures. If you waterproof your mast you shouldn't have that problem in the first place. I would suggest plugging all the rivet and screw holes and checking the foam plugs in the top and bottom of the mast before going with the bob. A quick and simple matter of some silicon sealant. I floated on my side for over an hour in 40+ knot winds (another story) and never had to worry about turtling. Even with that same wind pushing on the tramp it still wouldn't go under.


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 12:15 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2015 6:28 pm
Posts: 127
Quote:
To get a H16 that is turtled up on it's side is simply a matter of getting your weight aft on the hulls til the bows are tits up ^^ then quickly moving to the center again and leaning out. Do that a couple of times and it will be on it's side ready to get the bows into the wind and right as per normal procedures.


Sounds like someone who's spent way too much time with their mast upside down.


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:44 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 2:15 pm
Posts: 60
Actually, it sounds to me like somebody who enjoys playing hard and isn't worried about tipping or turtling.

A well-maintained Hobie with a waterproof mast is pretty easy to right ... but even a small leak puts weight exactly where you don't want it to right the boat -- nearly 30 feet away at the end of a long lever! Water rushes in quick with one hole, and rushes in even faster if there's more leaks. Been there, done that on an Spirit 17 in the late 90's.

Get comfortable with being on your side or upside down, and it takes the fear and concern out of it -- knowing you can right means knowing you can dump and that means you can sail harder and faster, closer to the edge. For what it's worth, I sail a Hobie 18, with more weight, volume, and mast than a 16, and I worried about it, too, at first... until I dumped it. The first time it happened, it took 10 minutes of futzing around to pop back up -- it was a new boat to me, my crew had never tipped before, and I hadn't worked the kinks out of my righting gear. I've been there -- but play with it, get comfortable with it, and it gets WAY easier, in my experience.

Randii


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 3:38 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 3:27 pm
Posts: 75
Just an idea that popped into my head, how about shooting in some expanding foam insulation into a drilled out rivet hole at the top of the mast. Like I said....just an idea. Any thoughts?

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2016 Hobie Getaway
1978 Nacra 5.2


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 9:05 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2016 4:35 am
Posts: 197
Location: Opelika/Lake Martin, Alabama
Wouldn't the foam stuff eventually soak up water and make the mast head heavier?

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Marty
1984 H16 Yellow Nationals, "Yellow Fever"
Lake Martin, 'Bama.


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:40 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:11 pm
Posts: 306
Location: West Point, Utah
BboySlug- Actually it was a rental boat up at bear lake in Utah. My boat has always had a sealed mast.
Randii is exactly correct. When I sail my boat, I sail it. Usually right on the edge of something. That is where I like it and I have loads of fun with it. No point in piddling around. If you are worried about flipping or getting wet there are plenty of monohull lead bellies out there to do that in.
I am also a fixed keel monohull sailor, but that is a totally different beast than hobie sailing. I own and sail my H16 because it is a high performance physically demanding experience. You are correct in stating that I spend a lot of time over on my side, but too much time-who's to say. I know that no matter what is thrown at me I can handle the boat and survive, usually with a grin on my face. Gotta love the opportunity for interchange here in the forum. Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:18 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:32 am
Posts: 335
Location: Lake Gaston, NC
The righting pole will still have about the same amount of leverage if the line goes to the pylon, instead of over the hull. That way, the lines can stay attached, and the pole only needs to hinge out into place, without having to take time to rig the line every time.


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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:02 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 20, 2009 4:00 pm
Posts: 478
Location: Charlottesville, VA
wanderoo222 wrote:
Just an idea that popped into my head, how about shooting in some expanding foam insulation into a drilled out rivet hole at the top of the mast. Like I said....just an idea. Any thoughts?


Air is way lighter than foam. Just seal the mast.

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 Post subject: Re: Upside down
PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 6:20 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 10:20 pm
Posts: 73
Location: South Boardman, Mi
Quote:
Just an idea that popped into my head, how about shooting in some expanding foam insulation into a drilled out rivet hole at the top of the mast. Like I said....just an idea. Any thoughts?


I have a hobie 16 with a mast that is sealed with 'great stuff.' Normally this would not be my first choice, but the mast had a crack through the sail track that ran from the cleats to to the slot. I couldn't get the foam plug seated far enough up the mast. I sprayed some foam in through a small hole, and did some 'rotomolding' to get the foam to stick all around the mast. This was just to make a relatively small (maybe 4") foam plug/barrier to keep water from getting in above the crack.

If I had to seal a more typical leak, I would just use the hobie plugs if the leak was at the tip or base. If it was leaking from the mast tang, I would drill out the rivets and reseat/reseal the tang. I would not recommend the spray foam method for 'normal' repairs.

~Joe


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