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PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:56 am 
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I just finished my '86 rebuild and I'm setting the boat up in my back yard to shake out the bugs and make adjustments. I have found that the farther I rake my mast back, the more difficult it is to get tension on the jib leech. The clew of the jib drops to about the same height as the front crossbar, changing the sheeting angle, making it difficult to get vertical pull on the leech. Has anyone else run into this? If I rake back farther than a 12" measurement, this becomes a problem. The mast base and step are new to spec. I've attached a link to photos.

http://www.kylepolzin.com/hobie16/


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2018 10:14 am 
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It looks like you have new sails. Do you also have new rigging. From my understanding the cut of the sails changed ever so slightly and the rigging changed, both to accommodate more rake some time in the 90's. New sails or not if you are using old rigging they may not work as well for the amount or rake you're using. When I had Murray's build me a new set of rigging they asked me if I had a modern cut sail.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2018 10:37 am 
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There is a chance my bridle wires are too short. They are 44.5”. I’m not sure what the most recent length is. My forestay is 19’, and my shrouds are 18’11”.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2018 7:25 pm 
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The solution is simple. Move the jib tack up on the forestay adjuster. Add another adjuster if you need one.

I'm not sure the Whirlwind sails are using the latest Hobie 16 jib cut - it has a higher clew to accommodate increased mast rake. That cut has been in use for 15+ years on stock Hobie sails.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 3:05 pm 
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Location: Clearwater, FL
Image

I use two adjusters pinned together, one for the jib and one for the forestay. A bungee cord is used to pull down the forward end of the forestay adjuster so the forestay cable does not rub against the jib.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 8:26 pm 
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MBounds is right. The jib is too far down on the adjuster. I'll have to move it up with that much rake. When you rake back, the jib clew drops making it hard to tension the leech. Rake forward and the clew rises, loosing tension on the foot. There's a sweet spot... just need to find it. Thanks guys.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:21 am 
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As I understand it, the "sweet spot" in where the jib tack is pinned as low as possible, but you can still go block to block when sheeted hard. This will also depend on the stack height of the blocks, and there's a way to pin them to the clew to minimize that as well. (Mbounds has posted pix of that here many times. It's sort of a pain, and I only do it for racing.)

Note that, once you sort all this out, you'll likely need to change where you pin the jib blocks to the clew also. They should be pinned where there's even tension on the foot and the leach (where upper and lower telltales are in unison/break at the same time).

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:54 am 
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Whirlwind sails... They came with the Hobie logos?

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 1:22 pm 
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No, I added those myself :wink: Chip was adamant that he cannot supply those logos.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 7:39 pm 
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What is the advantage of having the jib tack placed down low on the adjuster? Vs. moving it up higher?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 3:28 pm 
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aus_cat16 wrote:
What is the advantage of having the jib tack placed down low on the adjuster? Vs. moving it up higher?

Helps keep the slot between the main and jib from getting constricted at the top of the jib.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 6:29 pm 
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Thanks MBounds. Didn't mean to start a new post with that same question. I have read were keeping the jib low makes the rig more efficient, but you are the first I have found to explain why that is.


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