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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2018 5:25 pm 
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Posts: 334
Location: Opelika/Lake Martin, Alabama
What about those slats that are used to make lattice? Could those be used?

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1984 H16 Yellow Nationals Redline, "Yellow Fever"
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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2018 6:29 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 10:20 pm
Posts: 131
Location: South Boardman, Mi
Quote:
What about those slats that are used to make lattice? Could those be used?


Sure. Maybe give them a quick sanding so the splinters don't chafe on the sail.


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 8:58 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2008 2:21 pm
Posts: 362
Location: Winston Salem, NC
I posted earlier here that Sea and Ski in SC (Myrtle Beach) carries Hobie parts. I just looked at their site and they list battens. It isn't that far from Sanford if you wanted to pick them up yourself. That is assuming they are in stock.

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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 11:16 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:46 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Central NC
I think I have some battens locked down via craigslist, along with a new mast and a set of sails for dirt cheap. So I think I'm good for now on the battens. We'll see on Friday how good they are. Taping the driveway markers sounds like it would work great if these battens down work out, thanks for the idea. Thanks for all your ideas guys, I would definitely go out there with whatever jerry-rigged battens that worked.

hrtsailor wrote:
I posted earlier here that Sea and Ski in SC (Myrtle Beach) carries Hobie parts. I just looked at their site and they list battens. It isn't that far from Sanford if you wanted to pick them up yourself. That is assuming they are in stock.


Yeah thanks for that suggestion, I did look into them initially as they are my closest Hobie dealer. I used their parts search and it didn't turn anything up but the super jib battens.

I'm excited to (hopefully) get on the water this weekend!


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 12:03 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2008 7:02 pm
Posts: 433
Location: Rockford, IL
srm wrote:
Caelus wrote:
When doing this, I usually punch a couple holes in the tarp to be sure it can not hold water. You'd be amazed how easily a small puddle can grow to many gallons of water capable of bowing a mast like a toothpick. sm


True! I have a Hobie Getaway, and I bought the tarp type cover from Hobie because I stored my boat on the trailer in the marina parking lot. First big rainstorm, I got a phone call that my tarps were full of water and causing the tramps to sag alarmingly! I slashed a bunch of slits in the tarps so they wouldn't trap water.

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"Firefly" - 2012 Hobie Getaway with wings and spinnaker


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 8:16 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2014 8:16 pm
Posts: 31
Location: Portland Oregon
I'd hit up Ben at Salt City Sailing. They will ship to you, wealth of knowledge, awesome family biz, and fair pricing on new and used stuff! nak7ben@gmail.com

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1981 H16 Gonzo Nationals


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2018 5:31 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:46 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Central NC
cartapex wrote:
I'd hit up Ben at Salt City Sailing. They will ship to you, wealth of knowledge, awesome family biz, and fair pricing on new and used stuff! nak7ben@gmail.com


I'll definitely give them a call in the future when I need stuff. Thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 7:36 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:46 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Central NC
First trip report

Went to Harris Reservoir on Saturday. The wind was pretty much non-existent, but it blew enough to get out a few hundred yards and beat back in, and all I really wanted out of the day was to get the hull wet and put the sails up, so mission accomplished. Don't plan to ever go back to Harris Reservoir though, I'll probably just go to Jordan, the Ebenezer church launch looks good.

I made note of a few things I wanted to ask for help/advice/wisdom about.

First thing is that my jib will not pass through when I tack, I kept having to stand up on the front crossbar and pull all the battens across. I think this may be a light wind issue, I'm not sure, but I'd like it work work in light wind without intervention. Here's a picture of where the sail meets the mast at rest:

Image

Does this look normal? Is there something about the rake or my sail or something else at play here that is causing so much interference, or is this the way it should be? If this looks normal I may just trim the battens and see if that helps. Maybe go with no jib battens in light wind?

My next question is about the rake itself. In the picture I've got the shroud stay adjusters in the top holes and the jib halyard is super tight. Does that look like the rake it should have at that setting? Seems like the top hole would give a fairly vertical mast. Do I need to look at some new rigging? I had to put the forestay in the 6th hole down after tightening the jib because of how bad it was drooping on the sail.

Next thing is how hard it is to raise the main that last foot to the top, and especially the last few inches to get the swage/bead/whatever it's called into the hook. I was feeding/pushing the sail up as I hoisted, but at the end I was having to put everything I had into pulling down, and the mast was groaning and bending... just an awful lot of drama. Any trick to make that easier? Can I grease the track or something?

My stepdad was skippering as he is an experienced sailor, and he noted how heavy, long, and thick my sheets were, especially for light wind. I measured them when we got home and my jib sheet is 9mm, did not measure it's length, and my main sheet is 11.5mm and 45ft long! After a good bit of forum reading I ordered 32ft of 6mm salsa for the jib and 40ft of 8mm salsa for the main. I also took a few hours on Sunday to unlace the tramp and tightened the absolute dog snot out of it. It made a huge difference in how it felt up on the tramp, especially when stepping the mast.

I might try to get up to Jordan this afternoon after work, which will pretty much be a time trial of how fast I can get rigged up and in the water and get back out before dark.


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 7:47 am 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 3555
Location: Jersey Shore
The jib looks normal and having to manually pop the battens across in light wind is just one of the wonderful features of the Hobie 16 design. You can minimize this by trimming the battens as short as possible so that they only stick out far enough to properly tension them and no more. Or you can purchase "Super Battens" which are more flexible than stock and tack across more easily.

For the mainsail, it is probably mostly due to the sail being old and worn out. There are some things you can do. Spray McLube dry film lubricant all along the bolt rope. Clean the luff track in the mast and also lube it with dry film lubricant. Do NOT use any type of grease as it will attract dirt and make a huge mess of your sails. Also make sure the sheave at the top of the mast is running smoothly. They can wear out over time. Also make sure your boat is pointed directly into the wind when hoisting.

sm


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 8:21 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:52 pm
Posts: 57
Caelus wrote:
First trip report

Went to Harris Reservoir on Saturday. The wind was pretty much non-existent, but it blew enough to get out a few hundred yards and beat back in, and all I really wanted out of the day was to get the hull wet and put the sails up, so mission accomplished. Don't plan to ever go back to Harris Reservoir though, I'll probably just go to Jordan, the Ebenezer church launch looks good.

I made note of a few things I wanted to ask for help/advice/wisdom about.

First thing is that my jib will not pass through when I tack, I kept having to stand up on the front crossbar and pull all the battens across. I think this may be a light wind issue, I'm not sure, but I'd like it work work in light wind without intervention. Here's a picture of where the sail meets the mast at rest:

Image

Does this look normal? Is there something about the rake or my sail or something else at play here that is causing so much interference, or is this the way it should be? If this looks normal I may just trim the battens and see if that helps. Maybe go with no jib battens in light wind?

My next question is about the rake itself. In the picture I've got the shroud stay adjusters in the top holes and the jib halyard is super tight. Does that look like the rake it should have at that setting? Seems like the top hole would give a fairly vertical mast. Do I need to look at some new rigging? I had to put the forestay in the 6th hole down after tightening the jib because of how bad it was drooping on the sail.

Next thing is how hard it is to raise the main that last foot to the top, and especially the last few inches to get the swage/bead/whatever it's called into the hook. I was feeding/pushing the sail up as I hoisted, but at the end I was having to put everything I had into pulling down, and the mast was groaning and bending... just an awful lot of drama. Any trick to make that easier? Can I grease the track or something?

My stepdad was skippering as he is an experienced sailor, and he noted how heavy, long, and thick my sheets were, especially for light wind. I measured them when we got home and my jib sheet is 9mm, did not measure it's length, and my main sheet is 11.5mm and 45ft long! After a good bit of forum reading I ordered 32ft of 6mm salsa for the jib and 40ft of 8mm salsa for the main. I also took a few hours on Sunday to unlace the tramp and tightened the absolute dog snot out of it. It made a huge difference in how it felt up on the tramp, especially when stepping the mast.

I might try to get up to Jordan this afternoon after work, which will pretty much be a time trial of how fast I can get rigged up and in the water and get back out before dark.


Congratulations. I have been reading your thread. This is somewhat new to me....so my opinion with a dollar will get you on the city bus.

It seems you need an outhaul rope at leech of main. Also from reading....I believe you need to lower your upper shroud connection point. I only post out of curiosity as I’m a little behind you for my first sail.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 10:07 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 09, 2006 2:34 pm
Posts: 616
Location: NC
Most people go as low as they can on the shroud adjusters, trying to get the mainsheet as close to block to block when fully sheeted in upwind. The forestay attachment point really doesn't matter much, as it just holds the mast in place before the sails go up. Once you tighten the jib, the luff wire of the jib essentially becomes the forestay. The jib halyard is what tensions up the rig. The actual forestay becomes very loose at this point.

My shrouds are on the bottom hole of my 86' 16.

You may already know this, but Vista Point is where to go on Jordan for easy access to the water. There is a group of experienced cat sailors that meet there pretty often.

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86' Redline Hobie 16
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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 2:12 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2008 2:21 pm
Posts: 362
Location: Winston Salem, NC
Vista Point has a beach area so you can launch and walk the boat over to the beach to finish rigging. By the way, I always like to connect everything I can that requires little rings and pins while on the trailer in the parking lot. If you drop one you can find it.

When the jib is up and the halyard tight, the forestay will go slack. Some people have added an addition adjuster on top of the first one where they connect the forestay. They then connect a small piece of bungee cord to pull it over, putting tension on the forestay to keep it off the sail. The jib, of course, is connected to the lower adjuster. This is easier to see than explain. In 27 years of sailing my H-16, I never noticed any wear on the sail from the loose forestay. Much of that sailing was done at Vista Point.

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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2018 7:01 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:46 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Central NC
Second trip report: I took little blue to Jordan Lake this past tuesday after work and it was awesome! Maybe not very exciting to all you experienced sailors, but it was overcast and a weekday so the lake was pretty much empty, and it was just a little breezy so it was perfect for my wife and I to get out and learn the boat and sailing in general a bit more. I wasn't feeling at all confident that I would be able to skipper but it all just came together and the boat seemed to be sailing itself. There were a few times when the wind died completely but as if by magic the helm remained responsive and we just putted along very slowly, we just laid on the tramp and enjoyed it. Then a few times the wind got up pretty decently and we really got moving, big smiles across both our faces, it was a blast! I have no clue how fast we were going, probably not very fast at all.

srm wrote:
The jib looks normal and having to manually pop the battens across in light wind is just one of the wonderful features of the Hobie 16 design. You can minimize this by trimming the battens as short as possible so that they only stick out far enough to properly tension them and no more. Or you can purchase "Super Battens" which are more flexible than stock and tack across more easily.
I'll try to trim them first and see how it does. Hacksaw and sandpaper should do the trick, yeah?

srm wrote:
For the mainsail, it is probably mostly due to the sail being old and worn out. There are some things you can do. Spray McLube dry film lubricant all along the bolt rope. Clean the luff track in the mast and also lube it with dry film lubricant. Do NOT use any type of grease as it will attract dirt and make a huge mess of your sails. Also make sure the sheave at the top of the mast is running smoothly. They can wear out over time. Also make sure your boat is pointed directly into the wind when hoisting.
I looked into McLube at your suggestion, I got some of the Dupont dry film stuff since it was cheaper and on Amazon Prime, I cleaned the track and put a bunch in there this afternoon. I'll do the sail next time I hoist it. If it doesn't seem to work that well I'll get the SailKote stuff. Thanks!

FiftyDollar wrote:
Congratulations. I have been reading your thread. This is somewhat new to me....so my opinion with a dollar will get you on the city bus.

It seems you need an outhaul rope at leech of main. Also from reading....I believe you need to lower your upper shroud connection point. I only post out of curiosity as I’m a little behind you for my first sail.
Thanks, sir! I've been reading your thread too, that's my kind of stuff right there, it's looking great! I hope to restore my boat to it's former glory as well. To your points, I think I will start putting my shroud stay adjusters on lower holes from now on. Some of the stuff I've read says that I should be able to point better if I do, and I think it will help a little with the jib batten interference (it may not be a large enough difference to matter, but geometrically raking it back should increase the clearance). I've got an outhaul, that's it hanging mid boom. I do appreciate you giving the photo a good once over though, cheers!

abbman wrote:
Most people go as low as they can on the shroud adjusters, trying to get the mainsheet as close to block to block when fully sheeted in upwind. The forestay attachment point really doesn't matter much, as it just holds the mast in place before the sails go up. Once you tighten the jib, the luff wire of the jib essentially becomes the forestay. The jib halyard is what tensions up the rig. The actual forestay becomes very loose at this point.

My shrouds are on the bottom hole of my 86' 16.

You may already know this, but Vista Point is where to go on Jordan for easy access to the water. There is a group of experienced cat sailors that meet there pretty often.
hrtsailor wrote:
Vista Point has a beach area so you can launch and walk the boat over to the beach to finish rigging. By the way, I always like to connect everything I can that requires little rings and pins while on the trailer in the parking lot. If you drop one you can find it.

When the jib is up and the halyard tight, the forestay will go slack. Some people have added an addition adjuster on top of the first one where they connect the forestay. They then connect a small piece of bungee cord to pull it over, putting tension on the forestay to keep it off the sail. The jib, of course, is connected to the lower adjuster. This is easier to see than explain. In 27 years of sailing my H-16, I never noticed any wear on the sail from the loose forestay. Much of that sailing was done at Vista Point.
Thanks for letting me know about Vista Point, I think I might hit it tomorrow, I'll be solo, maybe I'll see some Hobies and maybe some of you guys there! I used the Ebenezer Church launch on Tuesday since it keeps me having to drive round to the other side of the lake, it's like 15min from my house. It has a launch with no dock and a little muddy "beach", it was perfect for Tuesday, I figure it will be my weeknight boat launch.


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2018 7:20 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:46 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Central NC
Ok guys I've got a hardware question. Here's my current jib car/block/cleat:

Image

...Not a fan. 1. It's a little wonky trying to pull down to uncleat it since it just bobble heads down, but when the wind is up it's not so bad. 2. I'd like to be able to move the car inboard/outboard without messing about with the spring loaded pin. I've seen some different setups for doing all this, but there seem to be a lot of options. Keeping in mind I'm not going to be racing this thing or spending a fortune on new parts, mostly just cruising around the lake, what kind of setup is generally accepted to work the best? I'm cruising ebay every day looking for used Hobie bits that would be upgrades to what I've got. Also, the systems that use a shock cord to return the car inboard, is the shock cord the only thing holding the car in when there's wind in the jib? I hope that question makes sense... there doesn't seem to be anything holding the car in place if you were to pull it outboard except the shock cord, which doesn't sound to me like it would hold tight in the wind.


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 Post subject: Re: 80 Hobie 16
PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2018 11:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 3555
Location: Jersey Shore
It may seem counter-intuitive, but the jib cars naturally want to pull inboard when you tension the jib sheet, so a bungee cord is all that’s needed to help return the jib cars inboard. A solid line and cleat are needed to hold the blocks outboard. The simplest solution is to purchase a cheek mounted bullet block and a “lance cleat” for the jib traveler system. The bullet block is riveted to each corner casting and then the lance cleat is monted facing the opposite side of the boat to allow the traveler to be adjusted from windward. Tie the traveler line and the bungee cord to the position adjustment pin on the jib car. Stack them one on top of the other so that they hold the adjustment pin up so the car slides freely without needing to manually lift the pin.

Those old seaway jib blocks are without a doubt the worst blocks ever used on a H16 jib system. They are unbelieveably difficult to release in almost all conditions (you will find yourself just whipping the jib sheet down onto the tramp with the line staying firmly cleated in the block). Every upgraded system (and there have been many) release by pulling the sheet UP. Save your pennies and get yourself a better jib block system. You won’t regret it.

sm


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