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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:18 pm 
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Live in the Charleston SC area and thinking of buying a Hobie 16 or a Wave. I had a Hobie 14 when I was growing up. I had a Wave 8 years ago while living in Hilton Head Island. I want to buy a sailboat that I can grow into.

My question is/are:
1. Can you start/learn on a single handed 16 without using the jib to make it easier to learn/handle? I have read that there is a balance issue without the jib.

2. How hard is it to handle a 16 single handed starting out?

3. Anybody have an experience in sailing differences between a 16 and a Wave? How much harder is it to handle a 16 over a Wave?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 8:46 am 
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Location: South Boardman, Mi
1) it is harder to sail a 16 without the jib than it is to sail with it

2) In light to moderate air, it is an easy boat to handle. In heavy air it can be a real handful.

3) Never sailed a wave. The H16 has a lot more going on than the Wave but is still a pretty simple boat. It sounds like you have some sailing experience and should pick things up pretty quick. Go for the H16. It is a pretty easy boat to learn on, rigs quickly, and sails better than the Wave. You might also consider a Getaway. The Getaway rigs quick, can carry a crowd, and sails surprisingly well for a boat built like a trash can.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:14 pm 
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Location: Opelika/Lake Martin, Alabama
Think of the H16 as a thoroughbred, she's docile enough to trot around on, but she'll run like the wind when asked to do so, if there's enough wind. You can't go wrong with a Hobie 16, but I am biased of course because I have one and Love it!!! :D

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Marty
1984 H16 Yellow Nationals Redline, "Yellow Fever"
Lake Martin, 'Bama.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 1:06 am 
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Im not in the market for one yet but just in case i do want one, can the h16 be broken down to just the frame? Is the mast a one piece? Im in the military and moving from one place to another place is as common as road kill. Movers cant ship items that are over 14ft long.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 8:38 am 
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Location: Hartland, WI
Quote:
Im not in the market for one yet but just in case i do want one, can the h16 be broken down to just the frame? Is the mast a one piece? Im in the military and moving from one place to another place is as common as road kill. Movers cant ship items that are over 14ft long.
The hulls are over 16' long and the mast would be over 26'

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JKK
83 yellow/ white decks Hobie 14 Corando turbo
82 yellow hulls Hobie 16 Cat Fever
84 yellow hulls hobie 16 Yellow Nationals
plus a few extras that I'm restoring


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:29 am 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 3462
Location: Jersey Shore
The Hobie 16 frame can be taken apart (although not that easy to do on a regular basis). As mentioned above though, there are several pieces that are over 14 feet long.

I would think the only boat that fits your criteria of easily disassembled and less than 14 feet long would be the Wave, which has a two-piece mast and the boat is designed to be fully disassembled (including separating hulls from crossbars) in about 15-20 minutes.

sm


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:21 pm 
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srm wrote:
The Hobie 16 frame can be taken apart (although not that easy to do on a regular basis). As mentioned above though, there are several pieces that are over 14 feet long.

I would think the only boat that fits your criteria of easily disassembled and less than 14 feet long would be the Wave, which has a two-piece mast and the boat is designed to be fully disassembled (including separating hulls from crossbars) in about 15-20 minutes.

sm


My TI was over the 14ft limit so I couldn’t ship it to s. Korea. First world problems.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 3:17 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 22, 2018 3:12 pm
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Location: Denver
BillFollyBeach wrote:
Live in the Charleston SC area and thinking of buying a Hobie 16 or a Wave. I had a Hobie 14 when I was growing up. I had a Wave 8 years ago while living in Hilton Head Island. I want to buy a sailboat that I can grow into.

My question is/are:
1. Can you start/learn on a single handed 16 without using the jib to make it easier to learn/handle? I have read that there is a balance issue without the jib.


The jib is pretty easy to manage single-handed. My first boat with a headsail was my 16 and I was singling it by the fourth time out. It's not as fast without someone running the jib for you, but it's still easy and quite a fast boat.

Quote:
2. How hard is it to handle a 16 single handed starting out?


It's not too bad. Every sheet/control line can be cleated off, so the only thing you need to keep your hands on 100% is the tiller, and you don't even really need that full time. It's definitely safest to sail with the mainsheet uncleated whenever you can hang onto it though. You can buy clamps to hold the tiller in place as well.

3. Anybody have an experience in sailing differences between a 16 and a Wave? How much harder is it to handle a 16 over a Wave?[/quote]

I don't, sorry.

I will say that a 16 is a great boat to grow into. It's simple enough that one can pretty easily solo it with a bit of experience, but incredibly fast with good wind and a good crew. They move really nice in just a breath of wind, which can make gaining experience really easy.

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1978 16, "Bifrost"


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 7:17 am 
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Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 10:33 am
Posts: 532
Location: Clinton, Mississippi
Fleet 53 might be able to give you some hands-on advice/exposure to various boats:
http://hcana.hobieclass.com/hobie-fleets/

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Hobie 16


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 4:43 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2008 7:16 pm
Posts: 26
Location: Pelham, NH
The Hobie 16 differs from the 14 you may be (more) used to because the jibstay becomes your forestay when rigged up. The actual forestay will be so loose that most people use a bungee on the bridle chain plate to help tuck it out of the way. The jibstay is supposed to be the stay to pull the mast forward and take all the force, the forestay just holds up the mast when the sails aren’t rigged.

Also, the 16 is way easier to tack with the jib. You’ll need to backwind to push your bow acrosshead to wind to avoid irons. Do yourself a favor a sail with the jib. It’s a set it and forget it type of thing when single handing.

Finally, consider a collapsible righting bag to make sure you have enough weight to get the boat sail-side up again. Unless you have many motorboater friends on standby.


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