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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:47 am 
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Joined: Thu May 24, 2007 5:28 pm
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Location: Bristol, IN
Sorry, I can't seem to find the answers I'm looking for by doing my own research. Maybe my search terms are not accurate enough, but I'm finding it hard to find information on how the jib halyards are rigged on the newer boats. The owners manual shows an image which is hard to see what is going on, but there is a more detailed picture of the race halyard rigging.
Mine has the cheek block and horn cleat on the side of the mast. I rarely go out in lighter wind, but yesterday while out with my son, the mast wanted to stay rotated clockwise. I had the halyard pulled on tight to get the mast rake up for the lighter winds, I've never had this problem in heavier wind. My guess would be the tension on the jib halyard and the cheek block being on the side of the mast causes the pull to one side. Am I correct to assume this? To remedy the situation, I have an extra cheek block, and cam cleat. Would I be okay to replicate this type of system so that the tension is straight up/down rather than pulling from the side like the old style, or am I missing something obvious?
Thanks.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 9:14 am 
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The front of the mast is kept clear of rigging so the jib can more easily slip around the mast. I think you'll find your sail cloth quickly degrading with all that there. Go with the aussie jib instead.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 9:37 am 
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Location: Jersey Shore
The new boats have two cheek blocks, one mounted down low at the front centerline of the mast and the second on the side of the mast mounted above the cleat(s). The jib halyard runs down from the hounds, around the centerline cheek block, then up to the one above the cleats and finally down to the cleat.

Having the halyard initially run down the center of the mast helps eliminate mast rotation issues. I believe there may also be a fairlead riveted to the front of the mast up high to keep the halyard pulled in close to the mast. You also need to trim the battens short so they don’t hang up.

sm


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 10:37 am 
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Location: Bristol, IN
Hobiewonkenobi wrote:
The front of the mast is kept clear of rigging so the jib can more easily slip around the mast. I think you'll find your sail cloth quickly degrading with all that there. Go with the aussie jib instead.


srm wrote:
The new boats have two cheek blocks, one mounted down low at the front centerline of the mast and the second on the side of the mast mounted above the cleat(s). The jib halyard runs down from the hounds, around the centerline cheek block, then up to the one above the cleats and finally down to the cleat.

Having the halyard initially run down the center of the mast helps eliminate mast rotation issues. I believe there may also be a fairlead riveted to the front of the mast up high to keep the halyard pulled in close to the mast. You also need to trim the battens short so they don’t hang up.

sm


Yeah, I figured that is why they did it that way back then, to keep the lines clear of the jib. I see how the aussie style works now by moving the block near the top. I've read that the aussie style is the standard on the new 16's. This system has the line running down the centerline rather than off to the side as srm said. I believe on the old style halyard, the block sits low enough where there would still only be the single line spanning where the jib would come into contact, but I wouldn't get the other benefits of the aussie style though, might be my next project in the spring. Thanks guys.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 12:07 pm 
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Location: Jersey Shore
Sorry, I thought you were originally talking about the Aussie system.

Even with the old system, you can still pull the jib halyard onto the mast centerline. Tie off your jib halyard using the horn cleat on the side of the mast opposite the check block (the cleat that's intended for the main halyard tie off). This will pull your jib halyard onto the centerline of the mast and prevent it from wanting to rotate off center.

sm


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 6:34 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
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Location: Clearwater, FL
You can install a "halyard grip" (Hobie part #114), to pull the jib halyard to the side of the mast. This will help keep the jib from rubbing against the jib halyard.

Another idea is to move your main halyard behind the shroud before tying it off to the side cleat. Next, after setting/tying your Main's downhaul, you can use the last 6-10" extra length of the Main's downhaul line to loop it around the tied off main halyard and pull it further back before tying it to the the downhaul cleat. This will also help keep the jib from rubbing against the main halyard.

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