Return to Hobie.com
Hobie Forums
It is currently Tue Dec 10, 2019 12:46 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Am I too light for a 17?
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2015 7:09 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:09 am
Posts: 106
Location: Austin, TX
I am 150 lbs right on the nose, sometimes a little lighter if I am training for races (running). I sail a Hobie 14, and I always will...LOVE that little boat.

I raced Portsmouth against a few 17's over the summer here in TX and my curiousity was tweaked a little. I sail solo pretty much 100% of the time, and prefer una rig cats. I have mast up storage at our local club, and could park it right next to my 14.

So...what is the "ideal" weight for a 17 skipper? How much weight is needed to right the boat?

_________________
85 Hobie 14 "mello yello"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2015 7:09 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
Posts: 2654
Location: High Point, NC
There is a 17 in our club and the skipper weighs about 225. He's too much for the boat, although it still provides him with a good ride. When I say he's too much for it, I mean that the boat isn't designed for that much weight. The stern is almost completely underwater if he moves anywhere from the center back towards the stern. Two people, forget it. It'll still go but the trim is terrible.

At 150 pounds you're not too light. I think about 170 to 180 would be about perfect. Expect to enjoy spirited performance in a 17 at your weight.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2015 8:01 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 3714
Location: Jersey Shore
About 170 LB is the ideal all around weight. At 150, you'll be fast in light wind, but will be overpowered quite a bit sooner than the bigger guys. Anything over about 17 MPH breeze and I suspect you will really be working to depower the boat upwind. I'm 210 LB and I think the 17 is a blast in the higher wind conditions.

Anyway, if there is a fleet of 17s in your area, I would say go for it. You will likely need a righting bag and good technique to right the boat at your weight. You will also need to carry weight in order to make the class minimum requirement.

sm


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2015 8:36 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:09 am
Posts: 106
Location: Austin, TX
Thanks, great feedback. Usually once or twice a year a nice 17 pops up for sale locally, usually a sport. I would remove all of the "sport" accessories and make it an SE.

I sail my 14 in our Div 6 regattas, but we usually have a good 17 turnout.

Guess I could run the 14 if the wind is honking, or drag the 17 down to the beach if the wind is going to be light or moderate.

There are two 17's at our local club, going to see if I can take one for a spin this fall.

_________________
85 Hobie 14 "mello yello"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2015 5:56 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2008 7:02 pm
Posts: 469
Location: Rockford, IL
Trap off the wing, and you can fly it in just about any sane wind. I flew a hull, trapped out, for miles, in 25-30 knot winds (I was about 180 at the time.)

_________________
Yet another Bob!
"Firefly" - 2012 Hobie Getaway with wings and spinnaker


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
© Hobie Cat Company. All rights reserved.
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group