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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 7:12 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:17 am
Posts: 4
I'm a new Wave owner with a little sailing experience. I will primarily be sailing from my cabin on a small lake that is connected to a big lake but separated by a road/bridge. (Was surprised how quickly I felt confined by lake size on this sweet boat!) I've only done it once so far but I was able to drop the mast, paddle under the bridge, and re-step the mast on the other side. It wasn't easy managing the mast on the water with my wife and I was VERY concerned that I would drop one or both pieces of the shackle on the forestay in the process. Luckily, I escaped with only a bruised knee (slipped on the sail laying on the tramp while lowering the mast) in the process and really enjoyed the bigger lake and less disturbed wind. Had an extra crewman on return trip so it was a little easier.

I see in the accessories catalog that there are ball lock pins and fast shackles available. These seem like a no-brainer if I select the right ones. I just don't know which would be the best option.

Also, can anyone suggest a one man technique for doing this that doesn't require being so close to disaster/injury through the whole process?

Thanks,
Mick


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:05 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2014 7:07 pm
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Can you capsize it, swim it or paddle under the bridge, and then right it?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 2:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
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Location: Oceanside, California
Use the main halyard... attached to a bow tang to hold the mast up while you detach or attach pin connections. Hooked to the bow tang is the normal single person rigging technique. Tensioned hard... it can hold the mast up without the forestay being attached.

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Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
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Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 5:39 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:17 am
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MITBeta - That's thinkin outta the box! I love the idea except the water is only thigh deep under the bridge.

Matt - Can you recommend which pin or shackle you think would work the best in this case?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2015 12:04 pm 
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So what does a Wave draw on its side?


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 6:12 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:17 am
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Another good idea but bridge is too low. Fishing boats make it under but pontoons have trouble.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 9:22 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 6:53 am
Posts: 45
Location: Dunedin, FL
The solution to solo-stepping is simple. We do it on the Dunedin Causeway in FL for any boat up to 6 meters. We call it a "Portuguese turnbuckle". Read my post on Catsailors from back in 2009.
http://www.catsailor.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=184433

How to secure your mast once upright.

First, get rid of the forestay chainplate. It's an awkward device and you can drop a pin. Instead, tie about 3 feet of 5/32 line to the shackle at your bridle junction. When your mast is horizontal and pinned to the front beam take this new line and take a loose turn around the horn cleat to hold the line on the front of the mast. Climb up on the tramp and lift your mast to vertical. It is NOT heavy. My son could do it at age 11. As cat masts go, the Wave mast is one of the smallest and lightest.

Once you have the mast vertical, lean into it to hold it vertical leaving both hands free. Looking up, you'll find the forestay hanging by your head. Lead it forward of the mast and hold it with your right hand. With your left hand reach down and get the bridle rope from the horn cleat. Thread the bridle rope up through the thimble of the forestay, back down and through the bridle shackle again, back up to the forestay and through the thimble again. Pull DOWN hard to tension the rig, now using a 4-1 advantage. Once tight, take one more loop, shackle to thimble, for 6:1 and tie it off to itself with a rolling hitch. It's very strong and allows any mast rake you'd like.

How to lower your mast (on the water or anywhere):

Pin the mast to the ball. Do NOT NOT NOT forget the pin. Stand behind the mast and lean into it. Reach forward to the rope turnbuckle and untie the hitches and pull out 2 or 3 of the loops. Now step back a bit and let the mast down slowly onto your shoulder as the rest of the turns release. In one motion, drop the mast from shoulder to hip. Don't lower slowly, do the shift from shoulder to hip in one motion. It's EASY. Awkward, but easy...do not fear! Now set the mast onto the rear beam.

The tiller crossbar is an issue. Your choices are
1) Set the mast on the crossbar. It will bend badly and is probalby not the best plan. I do it all the time.
2) Unclip the crossbar from one end and let it flop back. This works best if you have the newer clips on the ends.
3) Use some kind of block on the rear beam or tramp to hold the horizontal mast above the tiller crossbar.

Now your can paddle your boat under that bridge with the mast still pinned. Get to the other side and raise the mast and re-tie the turnbuckle. The entire process down and up (minus paddling time) is about 2 minutes with practice.

Here is a photo of mine for a Mystere 5.0XL fiberglass catamaran. I've used this system for 18 years on a dozen boats. The Wave is super easy since you can reach the turnbuckle from the tramp while holding the mast.

Image
Image


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 09, 2015 5:06 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:17 am
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Thanks dparker for the detailed instructions and photos. I think even if I stick with a pin, a short line tied to the bridle and then to the cleat will make things a lot easier. Since I am still new can you explain a little further what a 5/32 line is and where I might find some. Is that just the diameter? I think I'd like to try both ways and decide from there.

Also Matt, I was hoping you could suggest which type of quick release pin or shackle might be best in this case.


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