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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 10:30 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 6:11 pm
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Hello. I just bought a Classic Hobie Wave. No Trailer. I need to transport it to a lake about 5 hours drive (250 miles). I can't find a trailer to rent and am trying to figure out my options. An 8ft pickup truck is going to run me $300ish.

I know that it's stated at it can but put on top of a car. Just wondering if this is realistic. I have a Subaru Forester with the factory crossbars and a recommended weight limit of 175 pounds ... I believe the hulls are 80 pounds each.

If you have any experience with his or guidance I'd love to hear it. Many thanks. Craig.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 12:33 pm 
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Location: Orlando!
Congrats! I had that boat and it's very versatile and a blast.

You'd be pushing the weight limit but very doable. Don't know how much space you have inside, but conceivably the cross bars/ tramp, comp tip, and rudders could ride inside, leaving 2 hulls and the 12' lower mast section on the roof.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 2:41 am 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
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Location: Jersey Shore
I’m not directly familiar with the Forester, but in general, factory roof racks tend to be somewhat small and flimsy as compared to aftermarket racks like Thule or Yakima. You really need a sturdy rack and one that has a pretty generous front-to-back spacing to do something like this. It also needs to be wide enough to handle two hulls side by side. I would suggest you start by just taking one of the hulls and sitting it up on the rack and seeing how things look before going too far with this.

To transport the hulls on a rack, I would start by placing them upside down on the rack and strapping them against one another to create some stability to prevent them from rolling over. Then strap the whole bundle down to the front and rear rack crossbars. Last, tie a line from the bow tangs down to the front bumper and from the pintles down to the rear bumper to keep the hulls from pitching up and down when you go over bumps. If the mast halves can fit in the car, that would be the easiest. But otherwise, you will have to find an open area on the rack to strap that down separately too.

sm


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 2:03 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 11:34 am
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Before I had a trailer, I transported my Wave on Yakima roof racks spaced about 4 feet apart with no issues. I had the hulls and lower mast up there and everything else inside the vehicle. I believe the Yakima racks are rated for 150lbs and I was over that but did not have any problems. Good luck!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:42 pm 
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Thanks to all that responded. I appreciate the input very much!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2018 12:40 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 10:20 pm
Posts: 104
Location: South Boardman, Mi
Roof rack systems are designed to hold their rated weight, plus a little as a safety factor. Often roof racks are designed such that they retain cargo (they can bend, as long as the cargo doesn't fly off) during a 12 g deceleration event (city crash: ISO 11154-5). Point being, they are engineered to take some abuse. Sometimes they are a bit flexible, but they are usually quite strong.

A lot of aftermarket racks are designed to a similar standard.


Of course they do have their limits. If your rack is rated for 175 lbs, don't put 300lbs on it. And your rack weight limit does not account for unusually large aerodynamic loads. If you are going to put a 190 lb boat on a rack rated for 175, maybe you should keep your speeds below 60mph to reduce aerodynamic loading.

Good luck with your travels.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2018 10:55 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2013 7:18 am
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Location: San Mateo, CA
When I bought mine I strapped it, in pieces, to the roof of my subaru outback and drove it from Tahoe to the Bay Area. You can do it and just keep an eye on it while your driving.


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 4:07 am 
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Joined: Fri May 04, 2018 2:10 am
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My friend was planning a vacation with his family, he was facing the same transportation problem. As they have two Hobie wave and wanted to transport both of them and it was not possible to carry both of them on their car they opted for boat transport services they found on this site. As the service provided was hassle free and safe, they have suggested me the same service. So if you want to travel stress free you can look for transport services provided by a professional team.


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