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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 10:47 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:31 am
Posts: 4
I am new to salt water Kayak fishing.....still debating boats. It will prob be a new Revo 13 or Outback.

I had a near death experience boating and have a healthy respect for the ocean. With that in mind, I have a good list (mainly from reading these forums) of must have safety gear.

Gear aside, what do you consider sufficient self rescue practice? I plan to start in a pool....testing for leaks, falling off and getting on. Obviously, this won't duplicate the ocean.....I think I need to practice in a cold rough ocean wearing gear with a partner. Do you guys/girls actually do self rescue tests in the ocean/surf with waves? What do you do? What do you wear?

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Fred
www.fred-everett.com


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 11:09 am 
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Hobie Fish Tech / Moderator

Joined: Wed May 11, 2016 8:20 am
Posts: 399
I'd recommend wearing a PFD at all times, carrying a bilge pump on board, a VHF radio, a rescue ladder in the event of a capsize and lastly and EPIRB device. The rule of thumb when kayak fishing is to dress for submersion. Clothes that can get wet without absorbing a ton of water weight or filling up with water. Also, don't forget to file a float plan with somebody (family member or friend) each time you go out.

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Howie Strech
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 11:57 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:48 pm
Posts: 46
Wear a tether. If you come off the boat in high winds, it can blow away faster than you can swim. Keep a fixed blade knife on your PFD that you can easily access if you need to cut the tether.

Keep a waterproof VHF in your PFD pocket and know how to use it.

Buy a PLB, attach it to your PFD.

Put a strobe light on your PFD.

Carry day/night flares, the kind that make lots of red smoke during the day and bright red light at night.

Most importantly: file a written float plan with someone who cares about you, your shore contact. A good float plan will have the following information:

    When/where you plan to start.
    When/where you plan to end.
    Planned route.
    Description of you and your boat.
    Your cell phone number.
    If you are carrying a VHF or not.
    If have a PLB or not.
    Contact info for the authorities: USCG, Sheriff, Dept of Natural Resources rangers, Water police, etc.
    Communication plan with shore contact: let them know when they can expect to hear from you and if they don't hear from you by some cut-off time that you agree to they will contact the authorities. At that time they can relay the float plan info to the authorities and explain you are overdue.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:31 am
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Many thanks for the replies. I added PLB to my "must have" list.

Can anyone elaborate on specific self-rescue tests they perform with their kayak in the water?

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Fred
www.fred-everett.com


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 1:27 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:48 pm
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Looking at the sea-kayaking resources would be helpful. You aren't going to eskimo roll a sit-on-top, but a lot of what they use will still be applicable. One item no one mentioned is a paddle float. If the boat gets swamped, you are going to find that it's very unstable with all that water sloshing around. A paddle float is used in this case to stabilize the boat while you set to bailing.

I would practice righting and reboarding while wearing your normal gear. You may find out that you need additional handholds to get the boat back upright or that your PFD has a lot of stuff in the way of climbing back on board.

Half fill the boat with water. Practice removing that water.

Practice all this in open water with waves. Have a friend standing by to help.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:11 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2016 1:27 am
Posts: 333
Practice close in to shore in roughish conditions as you gain experience so that the one time when bad weather catches you out it wont be the first.

re PLB/EPIRB make at least one is attached to you (EPIRBS can be bulky and usually attached to vessel) as being separated is a big risk


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