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Outback verses Compass
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Author:  Gary J Domain [ Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:58 am ]
Post subject:  Outback verses Compass

Hello

I am purchasing a Outback or Compass in 2019. If I go with the compass I will have the 180 drive. Which kayak will fish better? My fishing is mostly shallow water Bassin. I know the Outback has more features but it is heavier and that is a small concern but not a deal breaker. All opinions are welcome.

Thanks

Author:  VaBeach1 [ Wed Oct 03, 2018 11:22 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Outback verses Compass

I used to own a 2012 Outback and have owned and ridden in numerous other Hobies/including the Compass. At the end of the day- I believe they all fish exactly the same- I never seem to catch more on any different kayak :) In my opinion- the question is more of how you fish and what you bring with you. I am a casual fisherman- 2 rods max and one or two small tackle boxes. (no where near a pro) Anything in the Hobie fleet works well for me..... Once you start adding a crate/live well, Technology- 4-6 rods......... and so on.... That is where you'll see the difference.

The Compass is a great in-between boat- sufficient decking/sleek hull/stand-ability and so one. By the time you upgrade drives/add a few minor items/square hatch... your right up in price with the Outback.

The new Outback has it all + Looks :) - Question is would you need to use everything it offers (primarily rear deck & added stability/weight capacity) -at what added cost & weight-

My Tandem Island used to be a beast, however now that I have my carts and loading process in place- its no heavier than any other kayak on wheels and easy to walk around. I trailer it, but park and cart it down and up from the ramps or beach.



------Once the kayak is on a cart- it weighs the same as a 40lb kayak and or a 200lb one........

Author:  VaBeach1 [ Wed Oct 03, 2018 11:22 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Outback verses Compass

I used to own a 2012 Outback and have owned and ridden in numerous other Hobies/including the Compass. At the end of the day- I believe they all fish exactly the same- I never seem to catch more on any different kayak :) In my opinion- the question is more of how you fish and what you bring with you. I am a casual fisherman- 2 rods max and one or two small tackle boxes. (no where near a pro) Anything in the Hobie fleet works well for me..... Once you start adding a crate/live well, Technology- 4-6 rods......... and so on.... That is where you'll see the difference.

The Compass is a great in-between boat- sufficient decking/sleek hull/stand-ability and so one. By the time you upgrade drives/add a few minor items/square hatch... your right up in price with the Outback.

The new Outback has it all + Looks :) - Question is would you need to use everything it offers (primarily rear deck & added stability/weight capacity) -at what added cost & weight-

My Tandem Island used to be a beast, however now that I have my carts and loading process in place- its no heavier than any other kayak on wheels and easy to walk around. I trailer it, but park and cart it down and up from the ramps or beach.



------Once the kayak is on a cart- it weighs the same as a 40lb kayak and or a 200lb one........

Author:  Sangorei [ Wed Oct 03, 2018 1:35 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Outback verses Compass

VaBeach1 wrote:

------Once the kayak is on a cart- it weighs the same as a 40lb kayak and or a 200lb one........


My wife has a Revolution 13 and I have the Outback. Both are carted, but dragging my pig is quite noticeable ... to the point where I unload some of my heavier items, ie drive, motor and seat (I have a bunch of lures in a backpack attached to it) to her kayak before hauling them. Even still, the Outback is still harder to drag along! Especially if you have to drag it through sand.

I find that the easier it is to transport the kayak equals more likely that I will use it. The Outback is just on the edge of that envelope for me, but when I used to own a Revolution 16 with amas I found that I was not using it as much just because of the thought of packing it up was not what I was looking forward to. Perhaps a trailer takes away some of that grief, but then that adds other issues as trailer parking space, quite likely lessening possibilities of kayak launches due to tight parking etc.

Author:  Gary J Domain [ Mon Oct 08, 2018 3:22 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Outback verses Compass

Thank you for your comments. Its a touch decision. Keep them coming.

Thanks and regards

Gary

Author:  Das Bite [ Sat Oct 13, 2018 12:11 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Outback verses Compass

VaBeach1 wrote:
I used to own a 2012 Outback and have owned and ridden in numerous other Hobies/including the Compass. At the end of the day- I believe they all fish exactly the same- I never seem to catch more on any different kayak :) In my opinion- the question is more of how you fish and what you bring with you. I am a casual fisherman- 2 rods max and one or two small tackle boxes. (no where near a pro) Anything in the Hobie fleet works well for me..... Once you start adding a crate/live well, Technology- 4-6 rods......... and so on.... That is where you'll see the difference.

The Compass is a great in-between boat- sufficient decking/sleek hull/stand-ability and so one. By the time you upgrade drives/add a few minor items/square hatch... your right up in price with the Outback.

The new Outback has it all + Looks :) - Question is would you need to use everything it offers (primarily rear deck & added stability/weight capacity) -at what added cost & weight-

My Tandem Island used to be a beast, however now that I have my carts and loading process in place- its no heavier than any other kayak on wheels and easy to walk around. I trailer it, but park and cart it down and up from the ramps or beach.



------Once the kayak is on a cart- it weighs the same as a 40lb kayak and or a 200lb one........


A lot of sense there, till the last part, about weight, try your cart on soft sand or incline and tell me you would be happy hauling 200 pounds over 40 :D

Author:  Tom Kirkman [ Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:26 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Outback verses Compass

The best fishing kayak I ever owned was a Trinity Bay (Wilderness Systems) Mallard. It was a sit-inside, 11 foot long kayak that weighed 48 pounds. It had no "features."

The reason it was such a good fishing kayak is because it forced me to return to the actual necessities of fishing. I carried two rods and one small tackle box (6-slot/trays). I was limited in terms of the gear I was able to carry and so I spent my time actually fishing, instead of switching lures, fumbling with gear or moving from place to place. I caught more fish during the years I had that kayak than any other before or since.

In the subsequent years I have owned many kayaks. Currently I own 6 Hobie Kayaks and enjoy the heck out of them. They allow me to go further and faster and be more comfortable while doing so. And... like most fishermen, I tend to enjoy messing around with rigging, gear, etc. So between the Compass and the Outback I'd say that if you're looking for a more pure fishing experience, get the Compass. If you like the full fishing package, get the new Outback.

Author:  VAyakker [ Sun Oct 14, 2018 5:54 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Outback verses Compass

I still haven't figured out videos on here (a site to use), but my point about the weight on the cart is easily summed up with "my 6yr old likes to pull the TI down to the ramp". As long as the cart is balancing correctly- they are pretty light.

Author:  SofaKing Fishy [ Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:59 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Outback verses Compass

I had the same decision to make - I car-top, so weight was a consideration, but I got a Rhino Rack Universal Side Loader bar on Amazon for like $130, so either is easy to load/unload - I could swing a PA if needed - it my Whispbars right out of the box - so I went with the Outback because:

1. I could afford it.
2. Even though I'm not a Pro, I still fish frequently enough that I really dig the extra features- It's a heavy duty ride.
3. I am planning on keeping this boat for a long time, so I wanted to buy something I could grow into, rather than something I could step up from.
4. I could afford it.

That said, the Compass is a very well designed boat- clean & open, and you could add some Sidekicks and a few H rails, and have a rocking fishing yak!

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