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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 9:43 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:01 am
Posts: 97
Location: Near Austin, TX
Hi folks,

Sailing has always been that "yes that would be cool, own and operate a 30' sail boat and sail the world" kind of thing. So I'm wanting to give it a try (less teh 30' sail boat) with my son. We have two yaks, a PA 14 and Revo 13. Does anyone have any recommended sailing basics book to read?

Thank you,

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Roy Niswanger


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 11:29 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
Posts: 2646
Location: High Point, NC
You can start with the very basic yet highly informative sailing instructions from Hobie, which I believe are on this very website.

Next, try Sailing For Dummies. There is one chapter, #4 I think that covers the aspects of point of sail and sail trim that are quite good.

From there, go out and do it. What seems a bit overwhelming at first will become second nature in time.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 12:18 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:01 am
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Location: Near Austin, TX
Tom Kirkman wrote:
You can start with the very basic yet highly informative sailing instructions from Hobie, which I believe are on this very website.

Next, try Sailing For Dummies. There is one chapter, #4 I think that covers the aspects of point of sail and sail trim that are quite good.

From there, go out and do it. What seems a bit overwhelming at first will become second nature in time.


Thank you Kirkman, I've already placed an order for Sailing for Dummies at Half Priced Books.

Need some time off to work on setting up the Hobie Sail kit on our Revo 13 and Pa 14.

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Roy Niswanger


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2018 5:33 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
Posts: 559
On the main hobie site, clik on the support section and bring up the how-to brochure that goes along with the sail kit. It is very concise, so read carefully. I think they recommend to always pedal while sailing, which I highly disagree with. If you are so inclined, just be sure your pedals stay straight up so the fins point straight down and form a daggerboard to resist side drift. The laws in physics causes them to slowly drift apart when your attention wanes (as you can see on videos) so check often or rig a device.

As for books, it pays to check out several to see if they speak your language. Some are pictorial and others are wordy for better or worse. I think I learned most about casual sailing my monohull from a library book about catamaran racing... simply because it was so articulate about theories in common with all sailboats. Right now I happened to pick up a "Sailing" library book in the colorful Eyewitness series, but it seems worthless clutter.

There are excellent pictorial guides online that I have run across with wide clear arrows showing force vectors, etc. Also there are great youtube videos like from the "RYA" royal yacht association - mostly about racing but also very professional introductions looking to bring in newbies into sailing. I watch their dinghy ones because I think a sailboat has to be within 8 to 18 feet to be lively and fun.

I lived in your area a few years as a landlubber for regrettable reasons. I wish I had sailed on TX reservoir lakes and the seacoast, but was distracted by how cheap aviation was there. For instance the Fault Line Flyers club was offering paid up members sailplane instruction for one single dollar per hour (for the instructor - the plane rental and air tow a few more dollars)! Anyway be alert to the possibility of flipping over in a gust, and attach a lanyard to mirage drive, paddle, and anything else you don't want to lose. Practice reboarding your boat offshore even tho you may only need to do it once per lifetime.

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My Hobie i12s... sailboat in a suitcase!


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2018 6:13 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:01 am
Posts: 97
Location: Near Austin, TX
daft,

Thank you for the reply. Second one to reference Hobie's site so I'll certainly check it out when I have time. Gotta play out my life duty as father to our 3 boys before moving out. I don't link being a landlubber as well. As a 6 year navy submarine sailor I fell found of the ocean. My dream would be to settle on the Gold Coast.

-Roy

daft wrote:
On the main hobie site, clik on the support section and bring up the how-to brochure that goes along with the sail kit. It is very concise, so read carefully. I think they recommend to always pedal while sailing, which I highly disagree with. If you are so inclined, just be sure your pedals stay straight up so the fins point straight down and form a daggerboard to resist side drift. The laws in physics causes them to slowly drift apart when your attention wanes (as you can see on videos) so check often or rig a device.

As for books, it pays to check out several to see if they speak your language. Some are pictorial and others are wordy for better or worse. I think I learned most about casual sailing my monohull from a library book about catamaran racing... simply because it was so articulate about theories in common with all sailboats. Right now I happened to pick up a "Sailing" library book in the colorful Eyewitness series, but it seems worthless clutter.

There are excellent pictorial guides online that I have run across with wide clear arrows showing force vectors, etc. Also there are great youtube videos like from the "RYA" royal yacht association - mostly about racing but also very professional introductions looking to bring in newbies into sailing. I watch their dinghy ones because I think a sailboat has to be within 8 to 18 feet to be lively and fun.

I lived in your area a few years as a landlubber for regrettable reasons. I wish I had sailed on TX reservoir lakes and the seacoast, but was distracted by how cheap aviation was there. For instance the Fault Line Flyers club was offering paid up members sailplane instruction for one single dollar per hour (for the instructor - the plane rental and air tow a few more dollars)! Anyway be alert to the possibility of flipping over in a gust, and attach a lanyard to mirage drive, paddle, and anything else you don't want to lose. Practice reboarding your boat offshore even tho you may only need to do it once per lifetime.


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