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PostPosted: Sat Jun 10, 2017 4:15 pm 
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Greetings!
My Dad and I just recently bought a H20. We are both very excited! I have been going over the boat and re rigging and replacing small things before we take it out. Something that has really confused me though, is the jib halyard. The boat is equipped with a roller furler conversion, just like the one from murray's:
https://www.murrays.com/product/50-48921001/
If you can see it in the photo, at the end of the wire halyard is a small single block, which is used to get a 2:1 purchase on the jib luff tension. The problem is, this block will not fit into the jib luff pocket on the jib. I can make it work by routing the halyard outside the pocket, but I don't like the idea of the wire rubbing on the jib all day.
I saw a picture of the H18 setup, and I think they might disconnect the block and reconnect it after the end of the wire is out the bottom of the pocket. I cannot do this though, there is no shackle on the block, it is permanently installed on the end of the wire.
I may just convert back to the standard front stay/bridle, and run the normal setup, but it would be good to know what the solution is for the furler.
Thanks guys!


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 8:52 am 
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There are a lot of ways to setup the furler on the 20, but what your describing should work. Typically the block is a 16mm micro block from harken, which fits through the jib luff. It can take a little finesse to get the block in, most people usually hold the sail and the halyard at the same time, keep tension on the sail while pulling on the halyard. If you still can't get the block through, perhaps you could post a picture of your setup. There may be something out of place.

It it also possible to run the furler with the standard non-furling halyard tension setup. With the setup you have described, you give up the ability to adjust halyard tension on the water. For casual sailing this is a non issue, however if you plan to race, jib luff tension can be quite critical, especially in light air. On my boat, I have the stock halyard turning block above the forestay swivel. I run the stock jib halyard, down to the stock 3:1 cleat on the front of the mast. When furling, the halyard wraps around the forestay. This system does not furl as nicely as the stock system, but it allows you to race with adjustment. I typically only furl the sail while racing during emergencies, or beaching in crazy winds. It is nice on the 20 to be able to furl the jib, it makes the boat much more controllable in big breeze.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 9:20 am 
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Location: Jersey Shore
The block is more hassle than it's worth (same setup used on the H18). Hobie stopped including the block on jib halyards a long time ago. Since the halyard is not adjustable on the water with a furler, there really is no need for the block (you set the halyard tension for the day and you're done). I would just carefully cut it off (yes you will destroy the block doing this) and rig without the block.

sm


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 9:25 am 
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If you leave the block on... You need to tie the halyard (use a bowline) to the block sheave to keep it aligned as it enters the pocket.

Image

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 12:53 pm 
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Thanks for the replies!
I'll try to mess around with it some more after work.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 6:16 pm 
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I have good success tying a long bowline THROUGH the axle of the micro-block. The wire rope attaches to the bale of the micro-block, but the tensioner line goes through the block's hollow axle, and the bowline knot hangs on a fat loop through that axle, with the actual knot about an inch below the block.

Having that loop cross-ways to the micro-block allows the line to drive naturally around the sheave without interfering with the knot (which hangs out of the way in the middle) and the legs of that loop between the bowline and the knot make a nice, smooth ramp to guide the sides of the block into the top of the zipped jib luff sleeve. I haven't had a problem getting that micro-block into the luff sleeve with the forestay since I started using a longer loop tied through the axle.

There's a great writeup here: https://www.hobie.com/forums/viewtopic. ... &view=next

I hadn't thought about the possibility of adjusting luff tension on the water. Interesting. Yet another thing to tweak! :p

Randii


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 9:07 pm 
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Ok I think I found the problem. My block is almost an inch wide, hence it not fitting into the pocket. I wonder why it was setup like this?
I swapped out for the original system, which is nice and simple. I like the idea of leaving the jib battons in place too (how do you even get them out? they look permanent haha)
Thanks again for the help everybody.

Image


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 9:18 am 
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Location: Jersey Shore
That's the block that is used on the original, non-furling, system. My guess is that someone took the original halyard and just installed it on the furling forestay assembly. It's never going to fit inside the jib luff pocket. The blocks that were supplied with the furling jib halyards were much smaller than that, and like I said before, Hobie stopped supplying the blocks a long time ago because they really are un-necessary.

You're either going to need to cut that block off or buy/make a wire halyard without the block. If you want to use your existing halyard, the best thing to do would be to cut the wire just above the nicopress fitting and then swage on a new thimble. Then you can just cut that thimble open and salvage the block for use elsewhere. But actually, I think you may still end up with difficulty because I believe the actual wire used on the furling halyard is a smaller diameter (and hence smaller thimble) than what was used on the non-furling system so that thimble may still be a little tough to feed into the luff pocket.

Bottom line, you have the wrong wire halyard and pulley assembly for the furling system.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 10:56 am 
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That block looks kinda big (I think that's a 22mm sheave), I could see that snagging in the pocket, you'd have to twist it from the bottom to try to get the becket spindle to slip in, laying just right.

Image
Here's a shot of what I have on my H18, with no becket under the block, and a hollow axle through the block. It is a 16mm block, and that 1/4-inch difference helps, but the real benefit I see is how the low-hanging bowline aligns and ramps the block into the top of the jib luff zip/tunnel.

This belongs to an Ebay item (not mine).
https://www.ebay.com/i/162442460261?chn=ps&dispItem=1
Murrays has something similar...
https://www.murrays.com/product/02-0486-00/

It looks like this:
Image

Randii


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:46 pm 
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I swapped over to the original system, so I'm good for the time being, but down the line I'll just cut that block off. Thanks again for all the support!


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 4:38 pm 
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Location: Northern VA
I saw one rig where he used the H18 furling drum (hollow center) with a turning block and swivel below the drum, and the halyard line went back out to the bow and then back to a cleat on the crossbeam. Could furl and adjust. Nice rig, but a lot of complexity. If I ever needed to adjust mine (Murrays rig) between races, I'd just crawl out on the bow. The forestay slacks off when you ease the main downwind, so you really only need to adjust for wind not course, IMO.


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