Return to Hobie.com

Hobie Forums

It is currently Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:37 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2015 3:20 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
Posts: 493
Shall we list some of our favorite accessories? My circumstances require more accessories than even the well thought out i12s package includes... partly due to the fact of me not launching with or near a vehicle as a home base. I will include some that I would need at a rough sandy location, although I only presently launch there with an inflatable SUP.

1) Freegrace Ultimate Lightweight Dry Sack 80L... This fantastically liberating bag can just barely contain your pump wrapped up in your rolling bag with it's rigid stiffeners. Why did designers assume you can leave those components behind, with an SUV or pit stop crew around to take it off your hands? With this $28 bag which can practically fit in your pocket when empty, you can be independent and carry what you arrived with clipped into the yak's rear storage compartment (just inches too long to fit in the front compartment, unfortunately). The only alternative I found was some heavy sack for several hundred $, not counting many other bags listing false optimistic dimensions.

2) Compact phillips screwdriver... You might have to fiddle with the steering lines or some other phillips screw on the yak, but a conventional screwdriver is a puncture hazard. I have a Ford promotional disk the shape of a 50 cent coin with tabs that I just realized were tapered to be compatible with phillips heads. Maybe you have some folding version, but it might freeze up with salt exposure.

3) Seaeagle Deluxe Inflatable Kayak Seat... I'm early in the testing phase but this seems to be a miracle in the back support department; you can really mash those pedals all day in comfort, with a slight increase in tippiness. Haven't tried it under sail yet.

4) Sail... What an elegant arrangement where you can seamlessly switch between sail and pedal power to get out of certain maneuvering problems a sail/paddle kayak could encounter in tight channels for example. Maybe an added foot batten will help on reaches or at least downwind.

5) Backpack... It sounds mundane, but you need something to contain small stuff held in i12s forward compartment or they will scatter into inaccessible parts of your bilge. Also there is overflow equipment that won't fit in your rolling bag (remember everything comes with me in one carrying trip from a possibly far away base, then must be stowed onboard). I hate the typical idiotic strappy backpacks with needless foam and zippers that can freeze with salt, so use one meant for kitesurf equipment.

6) Shoes... Nobody will understand this, but I am leaning toward wrestling shoes. I bet you all feel fine with anything from army boots to bare feet, but there can be pitfalls. I need to keep sand out, quick dry-ability, and durable soles. I have tried reef walkers that trap sand which grinds away flesh and their soft (grippy) sole can wear out in a few trips. Some neoprene things keep sand out but trap liquid in. I'm about to try training track shoes and river sandals that are on hand, but I expect high top porous wrestling shoes will handle tricky shore conditions along with potentially long overland walks.

7) Safety... This can be a boring subject because anyone who writes about may feel compelled to pose on the fringe of overkill. Instead of epirb or the new kinds of epirb-lite I intend to carry a non-sim phone that can only dial 911... as soon as I get a waterproof pouch for it. It really annoys me how all of a sudden every 20th hiker seems to call in a taxpayer funded helicopter pickup just because they are tired or their dog looks sick. Now I too will leave that recent world, reasonably stoic before cellphones who toughed problems out, or else had the dignity to lay down and die in accord with their bad decisions. A PFD with pockets is handy for a light, whistle, phone, compass. I carry a tethered water bottle within reach and usually a second one in the forward compartment. Maybe not overkill with our typical howling offshore winds and rogue waves with multi thousand mile fetch. Oh, I use tethers to everything detachable, as well as carry spare lines.

8) Gloves... Nice to shield hands from the ravages of sun, salt, and sharp edges but the typical paddling glove is expensive and nondurable. I want quick dryability, so as soon as my neoprene wonders wear out I have some cheap kevlar butchers gloves with pvc friction dots. Kevlar may be abrasive because it is kind of brittle, so there may be better synthetic alternatives.

9) Puncture repair kit... Can I carry onboard anything less than the included kit? Will my swatch of duct tape hold 3 psi of pressure in long enough to get home?

10) ??

_________________
My Hobie i12s... sailboat in a suitcase!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2015 5:20 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Thu Dec 26, 2013 11:52 pm
Posts: 124
Location: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
An accessory I never go boating without is my HeadSox. Means you can spend many hours on the water without having to constantly reapply messy sunscreens. And, when matched with the right shirt, you can make an emphatic fashion statement.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 1:04 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
Posts: 493
Lead Belly wrote:
HeadSox. Means you can spend many hours on the water without having to constantly reapply messy sunscreens.

I have noticed how sun can bounce up under my hatbrim, esp when glassy calm. Started me wearing sunglasses at least, and next I may try alcohol-gel-based sunscreen which is nongreasy and kills bacteria as well.

_________________
My Hobie i12s... sailboat in a suitcase!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 1:19 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
Posts: 12519
Location: Oceanside, California
Had an old guy from Minnesota call me the other day. He was very concerned about the guys wearing kerchiefs and wanted to know if it was required if he bought a Hobie. I guess full coverage protection has not yet appealed to some older conservative fishermen? He was pretty sure it a liberal message to be concerned about skin cancer. Maybe it was the bright colors?... it was an odd conversation to say the least.

_________________
Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Warranty and Technical Support
Hobie Cat USA


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 3:59 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Thu Dec 26, 2013 11:52 pm
Posts: 124
Location: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
mmiller wrote:
Had an old guy from Minnesota call me the other day. He was very concerned about the guys wearing kerchiefs and wanted to know if it was required if he bought a Hobie. I guess full coverage protection has not yet appealed to some older conservative fishermen? He was pretty sure it a liberal message to be concerned about skin cancer. Maybe it was the bright colors?... it was an odd conversation to say the least.


What if it was emblazoned with the logo of a farm machinery/farm chemical company?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 4:32 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2014 12:49 pm
Posts: 267
Location: Bethany, OK
I've never been much on covering my face. Mostly because I almost instantly turn into a "snot nosed brat" when I cover my nose... :lol: Don't know why. I wear the disposable paper filter masks when doing some tasks and it only takes a few minutes for the nose to start running!

Of course I also much prefer shorts and t-shirts to long-sleeve long-legged clothes too, especially in summer...

I do try to wear SPF-50 sunscreen on longer trips, though I'm a bit lax about it when I'm only out for a couple hours. I do that too often to get away with it though, need to use it every time.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2015 12:20 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
Posts: 493
The MN man may be a Navy vet who was trained to spray approaching masked boaters with M2 machine gun fire after the USS Cole suicide attack, especially if appearing to wear red dynamite vests. :D

RandomJoe wrote:
Of course I also much prefer shorts and t-shirts to long-sleeve long-legged clothes too, especially in summer...

Preferring is one thing, but have you visited a nursing home in a sunny clime where the men's forearms and lower calf/upper ankles are weeping with purplish sunspots? I think this is due to being extremities and getting less healing bloodflow.

Anyway, I have unstylishly covered up my forearms for 15 years after earlier sunblasting them as a carefree trimaran crewman - they are just now reverting to looking human like. Looks like I gotta do the same for lower legs, and also dabble with sunglasses and overpriced sunscreen. But I think sunglasses tend to reflect and burn a cheek spot just below them.

Oh, I could add a minor accessory whose name I forget. Called a waterproof keyholder, but it has none of that hard plastic bulk; just flexible flat clear plastic. So you can lanyard credit cards, folding money, id etc around your waist or whatever. I can hardly believe the sloppy way folks deal with home or car keys... leaving them hidden, or the latest fashion (which thieves love) is in a realtors padlock box dangling in plain sight.

_________________
My Hobie i12s... sailboat in a suitcase!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 7:01 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
Posts: 493
daft wrote:
10) ??

10)... Stick-on convex blind spot mirrors! The i12s forward hatch panel has spots on either side that almost seem meant for this. Gee, I hope Hobie doesn't phase out this covered compartment like I think they did on the i14t; it sheds whitecaps great although at a possible tradeoff of lee helm. Anyway I get slowly passed by a lot of boats at close quarters and would like to ease up on the constant rubbernecking required.

P.S. Hobie's 8/2015 accessory catalog: http://cdn.hobiecat.com/digital_assets/ ... atalog.pdf

_________________
My Hobie i12s... sailboat in a suitcase!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2015 3:34 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
Posts: 493
Lead Belly wrote:
An accessory I never go boating without is my HeadSox.

OK, I burnt my neck even under a widebrim hat, so I am giving a try to this neck wrap http://blogmac.missionathletecare.com/multi-cool (link shows 13 ways to configure it, including mask, hood, hat). It's meant for cooling rather than sunblock, so may not help much in the single layer modes. They only seem to sell medium size which is pretty tight, but maybe elastic will relax over time.

_________________
My Hobie i12s... sailboat in a suitcase!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 7:31 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
Posts: 493
I had to upgrade my neck sunshield to a painfully expensive Buff brand thing that includes sort of a bib to go under my rashguard and seal the gap that is getting sunscalded. It's a bit like a turtleneck dickey but can come up enough to almost resemble a bankrobber. Actual breathing holes lets me occasionally cover my nose which is the only other thing getting burned. On amazon. Maybe the Oz headsox are baggy enough to not need this bib.

_________________
My Hobie i12s... sailboat in a suitcase!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 6:36 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
Posts: 493
- Spare deflated belt life vest: Ever dread someone approaching you and asking for a boat ride? Spare PFD's can take a lot of space and probably got left behind. Now you can take these new extra slim belt pack pfd's as a backup (they must be worn to be legal tho). Sure you may be skeptical, but look at an inflation video. Pull toggle, pop inflated vest over head, tighten lanyard, and done.

They used to be the size of a "fanny pack" but are almost down to the size of a large belt buckle now, and often discounted. Also maybe suitable for an SUP session where you were going with no PFD due to the surfing loophole, but wanted an unobtrusive backup. Sure, keep wearing your mighty conventional PFD whenever you can otherwise.

_________________
My Hobie i12s... sailboat in a suitcase!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
© Hobie Cat Company. All rights reserved.
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group