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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:13 am 
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I've yet to launch from the surf, am a bit hesitant for the following reasons:

1. no below-deck rod storage, I'll probably bungee 2 rods to the deck

2. hate dragging the inflatable hull through sand...might have to look into gluing on a guard of some sort, fore and aft

3. most importantly, once I pull the rudder and mirage drive, I have zero tracking in the i11s. Usually I start spinning immediately, even in calm waters by the ramp. I can see losing control coming in, even in very moderate surf!

The striped bass have left the bays, and are running *just* out of surf casting distance on the beach. Not going to attempt a maiden surf launch in Nov, but any suggestions as to how I might go about it would be appreciated. There really isn't any bay launch access that leads into the ocean near me, at least not feasible w/o a torqueedo or something similar.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 9:56 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:00 pm
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I launch other craft in surf, but like you have hesitated to expose the Hobie to it. There is a calm wet sand launch I use which coats everything with fine salty clingy sand in the breakdown area, but I am ready to somehow move on to dry sand with vicious shorebreak.

reason162 wrote:
2. hate dragging the inflatable hull through sand...might have to look into gluing on a guard of some sort, fore and aft

3. most importantly, once I pull the rudder and mirage drive, I have zero tracking in the i11s. Usually I start spinning immediately, even in calm waters by the ramp. I can see losing control coming in, even in very moderate surf!

2: My i12s comes with a keel strip and a stern handle so I could keep the rudder stuff out of the sand when dragging. I launch a couple SUPs across sand (rigged very heavy) and carry it across the sand with a center handle yanking one arm off. On return I choose the least uphill area of sand and yank the other arm off. When I reach grass, I found pulling it by the stern is almost effortless - the curve of the bow gives a hovercraft-like floating just as good as wheels. I launch a paddle type kayak across the same area and have permanently installed a wide carrying armstrap to get across the sandy part (hard uphill).

3: Can't you keep the skeg installed and get enough stability to paddle out a ways? With a leash installed to everything. With non Hobie I find it reasonable to launch stern first (skeg clearance) and between waves jump aboard in water just above the knee. Somehow the twisting motion of landing turns me exactly out to sea and gives me a couple second window to paddle before being pushed back to shallows which could clobber the skeg. Coming in I use the paddle to the last minute, then fling it overboard rather than take time stowing it in order to jump and save the skeg from touching. I wouldn't velcro the paddle as mentioned elsewhere due to urgent need for access.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 4:41 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2016 1:27 am
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Wading hobies in to the water to a depth were drive (bungied up) and rudder can deployed before mounting is best way of launching. Then pedal like mad. You can pedal in the shallows with bungie still attached to avoid accidental digging into sand. Ditto on landing.They all handle like pigs until underway and pushing through surf. The open cockpit nature of mirage hobies act like a big bath tub when swamped making them hard to handle in any other attitude than head first into oncoming waves.

When beaching if using paddle unleashing and spearing to the shore while you hop out is standard yak landing technique, otherwise it becomes an encumbrance.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 1:29 am 
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WAVERIDER wrote:
The open cockpit nature of mirage hobies act like a big bath tub when swamped making them hard to handle in any other attitude than head first into oncoming waves.

That observation will help my i12s, but maybe doesn't apply to his flat i11s board with a potential skeg+rudder. And my non Hobie examples may not apply to his i11s with the raised and potentially fragile seat. Hard to jump up into. Maybe hard to jump onto the deck in front of the seat if blocked by the mirage bungee (pick other side). If you want clearance for long turbo fins and large rudder, you may have to walk so deep you can't really jump up (above 3 feet deep, the water seems to resist you jumping very high). Also beware of regular sandbars or underwater shallow sand moguls well out in the surf zone, for which I will be favoring the paddle.

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