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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:21 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 13, 2016 8:06 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Laem Sing, Chanthaburi, Thailand
Husse0416 wrote:
I also tested the anchor trolley and the anchor roller today. :roll:
The anchor trolley works much better then I thought. The trolley line stays in place just fine. I am still a bit concerned about the quality of the plastic YakAttack D-ring. :shock: I will try to get a copy with the same design/dimensions fabricated in stainless steel instead. CNC-machined or cut with a water jet, that would do the job and look muck better then what I can make:


Gustav,

Just a quick thought on the YakAttack plastic D-ring. I noticed in one of your earlier photos that you had your anchor line attached to the D-ring. I’m not sure if you are doing this in actual practice, but from what I understand, the anchor line tail should be run through the ring and attached to the kayak near your seat for quick release. The ring wasn’t made to take the full weight. That at least is my understanding.

I’m still looking forward to the videos :D

Cheers
John


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 10:04 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:46 am
Posts: 249
Location: Sweden, sjöbo
LSYak wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
I also tested the anchor trolley and the anchor roller today. :roll:
The anchor trolley works much better then I thought. The trolley line stays in place just fine. I am still a bit concerned about the quality of the plastic YakAttack D-ring. :shock: I will try to get a copy with the same design/dimensions fabricated in stainless steel instead. CNC-machined or cut with a water jet, that would do the job and look muck better then what I can make:


Gustav,

Just a quick thought on the YakAttack plastic D-ring. I noticed in one of your earlier photos that you had your anchor line attached to the D-ring. I’m not sure if you are doing this in actual practice, but from what I understand, the anchor line tail should be run through the ring and attached to the kayak near your seat for quick release. The ring wasn’t made to take the full weight. That at least is my understanding.

I’m still looking forward to the videos :D

Cheers
John


Hello John! :D
Thanks! Well yes of course, I see your point. I could try changing the release line to be a force bearing part of the anchor line. I will do a 5 meter extra line and run it thru the plastic D-ring insted and then tie it to a cleat at the back seat. The dive reel can be clipped on with a carabiner to the extra 5 m rope.
I still need to be able to quickly detach from the anchor and drift off but this will still work and lower the load a lot on that poor little plastic D-ring.
Thanks mate!
:D
/Gustav

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:34 am 
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Posts: 371
Husse0416 wrote:
Aluminium welding is a pain i.t.b. if you dont have the skills and equipment.... sadly I dont. :shock:
Otherwise for sure, I agree, saving weight is allways a good thing. Maybe in the future I will learn how to weld alu and upgrade some of the stuff.

Don't wait for the future, you should definitely look into getting a MIG welder with an aluminum spool gun right now. I am by no means an expert welder, but with this setup I can make excellent aluminum welds with no problems as long as the material is 1/8" (3mm) or thicker and welded in position.

You seem to be using a stick welder. Do yourself a -huge- favor and get a MIG, you'll love it. You can do so much more with greater ease and excellent results. It makes a fantastic companion to and can even replace a stick welder for most DIY projects. I rarely use my stick welder anymore after getting a MIG.

A MIG setup is not too expensive, most hobbyists can afford one. With the extensive metalworking work you do, it would be an excellent investment. If you don't want to spend the money for a Millermatic, Eastwood sells very good affordable MIG welders which are great for hobbyists.

Image

Everyone I know who invested in a MIG was glad they did, including myself. I don't know how I used to get along without it. It's paid for itself in household repairs many times over. I just finished easily welding a hole in my son's auto exhaust. It would have cost him over a thousand dollars to replace it, which is far more than I paid for the MIG. One of the best tool investments I ever made.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:29 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:46 am
Posts: 249
Location: Sweden, sjöbo
pro10is wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
Aluminium welding is a pain i.t.b. if you dont have the skills and equipment.... sadly I dont. :shock:
Otherwise for sure, I agree, saving weight is allways a good thing. Maybe in the future I will learn how to weld alu and upgrade some of the stuff.

Don't wait for the future, you should definitely look into getting a MIG welder with an aluminum spool gun right now. I am by no means an expert welder, but with this setup I can make excellent aluminum welds with no problems as long as the material is 1/8" (3mm) or thicker and welded in position.

You seem to be using a stick welder. Do yourself a -huge- favor and get a MIG, you'll love it. You can do so much more with greater ease and excellent results. It makes a fantastic companion to and can even replace a stick welder for most DIY projects. I rarely use my stick welder anymore after getting a MIG.

A MIG setup is not too expensive, most hobbyists can afford one. With the extensive metalworking work you do, it would be an excellent investment. If you don't want to spend the money for a Millermatic, Eastwood sells very good affordable MIG welders which are great for hobbyists.

Image

Everyone I know who invested in a MIG was glad they did, including myself. I don't know how I used to get along without it. It's paid for itself in household repairs many times over. I just finished easily welding a hole in my son's auto exhaust. It would have cost him over a thousand dollars to replace it, which is far more than I paid for the MIG. One of the best tool investments I ever made.


Thanks a lot for the tip! :D
My old MIG welder dont weld Alu so I will surely check this out in the future. Many years ago I tried to TIG weld some aluminium brackets but the result was a disaster so since then I have not given the issue much attention. Maybe its time to take a new look at this.
:)
/Gustav

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Sailing my TI and fishing.... thats bliss!!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:44 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2015 4:41 am
Posts: 93
Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland, UK
LSYak wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
from what I understand, the anchor line tail should be run through the ring and attached to the kayak near your seat for quick release.


This is the general way to run an anchor trolley...

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(retired) Outback - Hibiscus Red
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:48 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:46 am
Posts: 249
Location: Sweden, sjöbo
Haliboo wrote:
LSYak wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
from what I understand, the anchor line tail should be run through the ring and attached to the kayak near your seat for quick release.


This is the general way to run an anchor trolley...


Yup!! Thanks! Got it figured out! :D
Got the system set up this way now:
Anchor w. chain - swivel - 60 meter 4mm anchor line - dive reel w. float - swivel - 7 meter floating extension line (running thru the anchor trolley D-ring ) - ext.line tied to a quick release cleat on the gunwale at the rear seat.

This will work like a charm!
:D

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Sailing my TI and fishing.... thats bliss!!


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 6:58 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:46 am
Posts: 249
Location: Sweden, sjöbo
Secumar KSK 40.... and what is that?

This is my new automatic inflatable mast float that we have been discussing in this thread:
https://www.hobie.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=61507

Delivery arrived today!

Image
Image
Image

So I am planning how to best execute the test to try out this new device and see if it works as I hope it will.

I will try to set up the TI like this for the test:
Two separate anchors will be tied to the stern / bow of the TI.
The TI will be loaded with aprox the same weight as the 4-stroke, elecric motor, batteries about 250lbs total. Haka board will be in place.
I will do the test with the aka outfolded. To avoid damaging them I will add some support lines or straps over and under the main hull running out to the end of the akas.
The ama that will be "sunk" will be weighed down with aprox. 100lbs of lead weights tied on with a release line.
A line on the mast that we pull on and at the same time I will stand out on the ama/haka and try to get the TI to flip.
Once the TI is listed over at the side I will pull a release cord for the 100lbs weights on the ama so that the weight dont interfere with the result.

Then we simply have to se how fast the mast float deploys and if it can stop the masttip in time to stop the TI from inverting in "turle mode"!
If the TI gets inverted and the mast float deploys submerged 6m under the surface it will be interesting to see if this will aid the righting of the TI.
My guess is that with the mast facing straight down it will take about 30dgr angle to get some effect from the 40kgs of lift in the float but then I think the TI will come up in a horisontal position. If the TI lies on the side with both akas extended I hope it will not take much effort to right it.

I am still waiting for the delivery for the mast tip rotator that will fasten the float up in the mast but that should get here by the end of the week.
So I am just about to decide a day for the test and will call some buddies to help me out a bit.

Some folks have doubts this will accually work... but me .... well am very optimistic (as most times) ! :D
Wish me luck... this will be exiting!! :lol:
Isn't it fun "To boldly go where no man has gone before"!
:mrgreen:

I will off course post the results whatever the outcome...

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Sailing my TI and fishing.... thats bliss!!


Last edited by Husse0416 on Thu Sep 28, 2017 9:30 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 7:14 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 3:13 pm
Posts: 371
Husse0416 wrote:
Thanks a lot for the tip! :D
My old MIG welder dont weld Alu so I will surely check this out in the future. Many years ago I tried to TIG weld some aluminium brackets but the result was a disaster so since then I have not given the issue much attention. Maybe its time to take a new look at this.
:)
/Gustav

TIG welding aluminum takes considerable skill and practice and is primarily for pros. MIG welding is much easier, almost anyone can do it.

Also, consider getting a Powder Coat setup for finishing your work with a surface coating much tougher and easier to apply than paint. These too do not cost much and provide excellent results.

Image

With a MIG welder and a Powder coat system you can produce DIY metal working projects that look professional.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 7:15 am 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 3:13 pm
Posts: 371
Husse0416 wrote:
Secumar KSK 40.... and what is that?

This is my new automatic inflatable mast float that we have been discussing in this thread:
https://www.hobie.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=61507

Delivery arrived today!

Image
Image
Image

So I am planning how to best execute the test to try out this new device and see if it works as I hope it will.

I will try to set up the TI like this for the test.
Two separate anchors will be tied to the stern / bow of the TI.
The TI wilm be loaded with aprox the same weight as the 4-stroke, elecric, batteries abiut 200lbs. Haka board will be in place.
I will do the test with the aka outfolded. To avoid damaging them I wilm add some support lines over and under the main hull running out to the end of the akas.
The ama that will be "sunk" will be weighed down with aprox. 100lbs.
A line on the mast that we pull at and at the same time I will stand out on the ama/haka and try tonget the TI to flip.
Once the TI is listed over at the side I will pull a release cord for the 100lbs weights on the ama so that the weight dont interfere with the result.
Then we have to se how fast the boi deploys and if it can keep up the masttip in time to stop the TI from inverting in "turle mode"!

I am still waiting for the delivery for the mast tip rotator that will fasten the float up in the mast but that should get here by the end of the week.
So I am just about to decide a day for the test a d calling some buddies to help me out!

Some folk have doubts this will accually work... but me .... I am very optimistic! :D
Wish me luck... this will be exiting!! :lol:
Isn't it fun "To boldly go where no man has gone before"
:mrgreen:

I will off course post the results whatever the outcome...


I'm really looking forward to the results from this. Please consider taking videos.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 8:58 am 
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Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:46 am
Posts: 249
Location: Sweden, sjöbo
pro10is wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
Secumar KSK 40.... and what is that?

This is my new automatic inflatable mast float that we have been discussing in this thread:
https://www.hobie.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=61507

Delivery arrived today!

So I am planning how to best execute the test to try out this new device and see if it works as I hope it will.

I will try to set up the TI like this for the test.
Two separate anchors will be tied to the stern / bow of the TI.
The TI wilm be loaded with aprox the same weight as the 4-stroke, elecric, batteries abiut 200lbs. Haka board will be in place.
I will do the test with the aka outfolded. To avoid damaging them I wilm add some support lines over and under the main hull running out to the end of the akas.
The ama that will be "sunk" will be weighed down with aprox. 100lbs.
A line on the mast that we pull at and at the same time I will stand out on the ama/haka and try tonget the TI to flip.
Once the TI is listed over at the side I will pull a release cord for the 100lbs weights on the ama so that the weight dont interfere with the result.
Then we have to se how fast the boi deploys and if it can keep up the masttip in time to stop the TI from inverting in "turle mode"!

I am still waiting for the delivery for the mast tip rotator that will fasten the float up in the mast but that should get here by the end of the week.
So I am just about to decide a day for the test a d calling some buddies to help me out!

Some folk have doubts this will accually work... but me .... I am very optimistic! :D
Wish me luck... this will be exiting!! :lol:
Isn't it fun "To boldly go where no man has gone before"
:mrgreen:

I will off course post the results whatever the outcome...


I'm really looking forward to the results from this. Please consider taking videos.


Sure! We will document the event on video and pics!! :)
:D

Thanks for the tip about the powder coating gun... never seen one of thoose before! :) Looks very interesting!
Really would be great as the issue with aluminium in marine environment also is the corrosion. Anodizing is pretty expensive, (last i checked anyway), so this would be an anlternative.

Well I guess Santa will have to work his but off this Christmas.... LOL!
All the best!

_________________
Sailing my TI and fishing.... thats bliss!!


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2015 4:41 am
Posts: 93
Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland, UK
Husse0416 wrote:
Haliboo wrote:
LSYak wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
from what I understand, the anchor line tail should be run through the ring and attached to the kayak near your seat for quick release.


This is the general way to run an anchor trolley...


Yup!! Thanks! Got it figured out! :D
Got the system set up this way now:
Anchor w. chain - swivel - 60 meter 4mm anchor line - dive reel w. float - swivel - 7 meter floating extension line (running thru the anchor trolley D-ring ) - ext.line tied to a quick release cleat on the gunwale at the rear seat.

This will work like a charm!
:D


Gustav,

Very well worth considering also - instead of the usual zip-tie weak link etc. when fishing is the use of a trip link. This has saved me on quite a few occasions, and I've only lost one anchor since using it (2 years now)

See links:

http://www.anchortrip.co.uk/

Also, great article about anchoring from DizzyFish:

http://dizzybigfish.co.uk/review-of-anchor-trip-link-clip/

Advantages:
1. Obvious one is releases stuck anchor
2. Trip 'force' is adjustable'
3. Ability to instantly reset
4. Cheap
5. No more guess work - can be tested at surface

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(retired) Outback - Hibiscus Red
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 2:54 pm 
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Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:46 am
Posts: 249
Location: Sweden, sjöbo
Haliboo wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
Haliboo wrote:
LSYak wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
from what I understand, the anchor line tail should be run through the ring and attached to the kayak near your seat for quick release.


This is the general way to run an anchor trolley...


Yup!! Thanks! Got it figured out! :D
Got the system set up this way now:
Anchor w. chain - swivel - 60 meter 4mm anchor line - dive reel w. float - swivel - 7 meter floating extension line (running thru the anchor trolley D-ring ) - ext.line tied to a quick release cleat on the gunwale at the rear seat.

This will work like a charm!
:D


Gustav,

Very well worth considering also - instead of the usual zip-tie weak link etc. when fishing is the use of a trip link. This has saved me on quite a few occasions, and I've only lost one anchor since using it (2 years now)

See links:

http://www.anchortrip.co.uk/

Also, great article about anchoring from DizzyFish:

http://dizzybigfish.co.uk/review-of-anchor-trip-link-clip/


Geat Tip! I will definately order two of those clips for the anchors!!

Lots of good info from all you guys!
:D
Thanks!! :)

Otherwise I have had a very productive afternoon.

-Been busy with the transducer mounts, will post when the are testmouted, hopefully tomorrow.

-I have solved the new routing of the furl line, must weld a small bracket but I am sure it will work perfectly.

-I also riveted the extra rear akas but left one hole on each side open were I might be adding a buckel for tensioning the rear tramp.

- After reading the reports about mast failiures I inspected the base of the mast were others had reported scuff marks and ware from the aluminium rivet in the sail base cleat.
Sure enough there are definately starting to show marks on the carbon. The aluminium is probably a bit softer then the carbon so the aluminium is slowly scraped down leaving marks in the carbon. As the aluminium rivets slowly get rugged and sharp from the ware I guess it will start degrading the carbon and slowly weakening the mast with an increased risk of failiure! :shock:

Image
Image
Image
Image

I will slide a thin plastic tube or pipe over the base of the mast to protect it from the cleat rivets.
It is hard to find the right size ( a 53-55mm diam) bottle or tube that fits well but I will keep on looking
The issue definately needs to be fixed but the risk of damage is a very slow process. :?
I am done for today, very well done accually, overcooked really! :lol:
See ya!
:mrgreen:
/Gustav

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 4:45 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:08 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Canberra, Australia
Hi Gustav,
I found that sliding a 300mm length of 50mm heat-shrink tubing over the affected area of the mast, then warmed with a hair dryer to shrink it down, provided a neat and effective solution. https://www.jaycar.com.au/heatshrink-tu ... k/p/WH5582
Cheers... Mark


Last edited by sanfli on Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:36 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 3:13 pm
Posts: 371
Husse0416 wrote:
Thanks for the tip about the powder coating gun... never seen one of thoose before! :) Looks very interesting!
Really would be great as the issue with aluminium in marine environment also is the corrosion. Anodizing is pretty expensive, (last i checked anyway), so this would be an anlternative.

Well I guess Santa will have to work his but off this Christmas.... LOL!
All the best!

Powder coating is amazingly easy. You simply spray on the powder with the gun and then bake the part at 205 degrees C for 20 minutes. Once the part cools off it's ready to go with a very thick and tough plastic coating that is superior than paint. It will work on mild steel, stainless, aluminum, and virtually anything metal.

The powder comes in a huge variety of colors and textures and can even imitate chrome. A guy like you would have a blast with a powder coat system. Everything you need to get started would cost under $250 USD. I rarely use paint anymore, except on non-metallic items.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:40 pm 
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Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:46 am
Posts: 249
Location: Sweden, sjöbo
pro10is wrote:
Husse0416 wrote:
Thanks for the tip about the powder coating gun... never seen one of thoose before! :) Looks very interesting!
Really would be great as the issue with aluminium in marine environment also is the corrosion. Anodizing is pretty expensive, (last i checked anyway), so this would be an anlternative.

Well I guess Santa will have to work his but off this Christmas.... LOL!
All the best!

Powder coating is amazingly easy. You simply spray on the powder with the gun and then bake the part at 205 degrees C for 20 minutes. Once the part cools off it's ready to go with a very thick and tough plastic coating that is superior than paint. It will work on mild steel, stainless, aluminum, and virtually anything metal.

The powder comes in a huge variety of colors and textures and can even imitate chrome. A guy like you would have a blast with a powder coat system. Everything you need to get started would cost under $250 USD. I rarely use paint anymore, except on non-metallic items.


Yup I had some stuff for my RIB powdercoated a few years ago. A company i town did the job with a result that was far from perfect and it was pretty expensive. Would be grate to have the means to do in "in house" instead! :)
This is definately going on to my wish list!
:D
/Gustav

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