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PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 7:30 am 
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mcoop57 wrote:
That’s it exactly Tony, thanks for the photo!

Mr Pro10, it’s my opinion that an automatic bilge pump (even though it’s crazy cool) is just a bit overkill for this application. I have managed a decade of pedal sailing without a 12V system, and am kind of determined to keep it that way.

When it comes to bilge pumps and you're sinking, overkill is exactly what you want.

Before I installed an automatic bilge pump I use to come back from a rough day on the water with up to 10-20 gallons of water in the hull due to the leaking front hatch. The pump solved this problem.

As long as you have a 12 Volt battery on board, an automatic bilge pump is ideal. I have a depth finder/chart plotter so I do have a battery. Installing a 12Volt battery in a TI is a breeze. Hobie sells a kit to do in either a Waterproof Gel Cell Battery or lithium.

I also carry a manual pump but I never have to use it anymore.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 7:55 pm 
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The issue with the pump inlet in the drink holder is not only that it isn't at the lowest section of the hull, when under way the water collects in the rear, especially when pedalling as boats nose rises. As it fills with water rear sinks even lower. More and more water comes in the rudder lines as they submerge. So you have a fair amount of water in hull before it comes anywhere near the inlet.

If you have anything in the hull you have to ensure it can't foul the inlet once its sloshing around in the water. I know I have sucked a plastic bag into a manual bilge pump causing it to fail to operate


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 10:11 pm 
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Sorry, but in my opinion, fitting greater bilge pump capacity instead of reducing the volume of water ingress in the first place is the classic "putting lipstick on a pig" scenario. I have never had more than one gallon in the hull, and that was after a 8 hour vigorous sail offshore. (I am still working to reduce water intake even further, even though I have NEVER needed to use my bilge pump -instead opening the bung after retrieval on land)

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2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 10:18 pm 
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Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
WAVERIDER wrote:
The issue with the pump inlet in the drink holder is not only that it isn't at the lowest section of the hull, when under way the water collects in the rear, especially when pedalling as boats nose rises. As it fills with water rear sinks even lower. More and more water comes in the rudder lines as they submerge. So you have a fair amount of water in hull before it comes anywhere near the inlet.

If you have anything in the hull you have to ensure it can't foul the inlet once its sloshing around in the water. I know I have sucked a plastic bag into a manual bilge pump causing it to fail to operate


Agreed, but see my comment above about porcine makeup...
Have you:-
    Smeared silicon on rudder lines to reduce the diameter of possible water ingress?
    Ensured that round hatch gaskets are grit free and silicone covered to ensure optimal sealing?
    Worked on minimising water intrusion through the front hatch?



Keeping water out is way preferable to removing it afterwards.

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2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 10:17 am 
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I can't speak for everyone but I've tried all the tricks on this forum and more to reduce water ingress, to no avail. I've also worked with my Hobie dealer on the problem. He and I both agree from numerous testing that no significant water is entering via the hull, it's definitely coming in via the front hatch. Both he and I have worked on the hatch for years, trying many different methods to mitigate the problem. We both finally gave up. He said Hobie's stance on this was that the hatch is only leak resistant, not leak proof so I would not be getting a new hull or even a new hatch cover and would just have to live with it. It's only an issue when waves break over the front hatch, so there's not much more I can do.

Some TI's don't have this issue but many do. The TI front hatch is infamous for leaking, this forum is full of such accounts. If you have a TI that doesn't have a leaking front hatch, count yourself lucky.

I went for years without an electric bilge pump trying to resolve the leaking issue instead. I got tired of draining gallons of water out of the hull at the launch ramp after a rough day on the water, so I finally decided to see what would happen if I installed a pump.

The parts cost about $75 (I already had the battery), installation was simple, and best of all it completely resolved the problem. Only a few drops ever come out now. It also gives me the security and confidence of knowing that if I ever got a significant leak miles from shore I would have a good chance of making it back to the dock. Rather than sitting idle while trying to manually bail out the boat, I would be sailing back asap while the automatic pump did the bailing for me. On the large body of water where I sail, this could be critical. I've been in some very dangerous unforeseen storms and life-threatening situations. In such cases, I want all the help I can get to stay afloat. Others may disagree but everyone is responsible for their own safety and the safety of their passengers. I often sail with my daughter and son so safety is paramount to me.

I highly recommend an electric bilge pump. It's a safety device and all boats traveling miles from shore should have one.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:12 pm 
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I believe stringy came up with the definitive solution for a leaking front hatch. For want of a better description, the device is a "shower cap".

A plastic cover stretches over the hatch opening, and is kept in place by elastic in the hem of the "cap" which euns around on the outer vertical side of the hatch opening.

This can be used alongside any of the other alternative solutions out there.

Sometimes simple answers are best....

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2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:42 pm 
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Location: Niceville, Florida
Well the curiosity was killing me this morning, just had to take the T.I. out trolling to see just how much water I take in on the average trip. I launched at 8 am, and pulled out at 3 pm. Trip duration was 21 miles. I was solo and the waters were pretty calm. I took no waves over the bow and no water over the gunwales. When I stopped for lunch in the Destin harbor, I opened the rear hatch and there was a small “puddle” in the stern below. I climbed in and out of the boat (with soaking wet pants) several times during the day. The rear of the boat where the rudder lines enter never came close to being submerged. When I got back home in the driveway, I drained the bilge into a large shallow pan and the poured it into a five gallon bucket to measure it. There was about two gallons in it. I feel pretty good now with my ability to overcome this with a hand operated bilge pump. Thanks to everyone for contributing to the conversation.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 11, 2019 5:50 am 
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mcoop57 wrote:
Well the curiosity was killing me this morning, just had to take the T.I. out trolling to see just how much water I take in on the average trip. I launched at 8 am, and pulled out at 3 pm. Trip duration was 21 miles. I was solo and the waters were pretty calm. I took no waves over the bow and no water over the gunwales. When I stopped for lunch in the Destin harbor, I opened the rear hatch and there was a small “puddle” in the stern below. I climbed in and out of the boat (with soaking wet pants) several times during the day. The rear of the boat where the rudder lines enter never came close to being submerged. When I got back home in the driveway, I drained the bilge into a large shallow pan and the poured it into a five gallon bucket to measure it. There was about two gallons in it. I feel pretty good now with my ability to overcome this with a hand operated bilge pump. Thanks to everyone for contributing to the conversation.

Please test this again on a rough day. I get virtually no water ingress on a calm day but up to 10-20 gallons on a very rough day. Also, when you consider a bilge pump, always plan for a scenario much worse than ordinary. For example, if you develop significant leak miles from shore or if you get caught in a major unforeseen storm. Both have happened to me. When it comes to boats and survivability, always plan for a worst-case scenario and be ready for anything.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 11, 2019 5:59 am 
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tonystott wrote:
I believe stringy came up with the definitive solution for a leaking front hatch. For want of a better description, the device is a "shower cap".

A plastic cover stretches over the hatch opening, and is kept in place by elastic in the hem of the "cap" which euns around on the outer vertical side of the hatch opening.

This can be used alongside any of the other alternative solutions out there.

Sometimes simple answers are best....

This is one of the first things I tried. Apart from being very inconvenient, it didn't work, at least not for me. Nor did the other fixes, I tried them all, a few of my own, and a few from the Hobie dealer. Neither my dealer or I can figure out how the water gets in via the hatch, but somehow it does. There's the remote possibility it's not coming in via the hatch, but we exhausted all other entry points. It only happens in rough water.

The pump solved the issue for me.


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