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PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2014 8:38 pm 
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CR Yaker wrote:
Wow, I like the idea of this SPOT device after reading more, online. Thanks guys, it's on my to do list.


After reviewing several options, I opted for a DeLorme InReach Explorer - a bit more expensive up front than the SPOT, but I can activate / deactivate monthly as I need it. Also functions as a GPS (though I'm still partial to my trusty old Garmin etrex). The InReach works off the Iridium network.

I almost got the SPOT and probably would have been happy with it too.

To be really safe I should probably have gotten a EPIRB or PLB. I should also get a marine radio.

Anyway, there are several options out there to choose from.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 7:47 am 
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Yes, all of us that travel solo, or travel several miles off shore, or do trips with friends, all of us should carry a "waterproof' VHF radio (IPX7 or IPX8 rating--you can't trust these ratings too strongly, but for normal use, these ratings will keep your equipment operating in wet conditions.) Good radios are the Uniden MHS235 or Standard Horizon 851. My next radio may be a Uniden MHS126--not as many bells and whistles as the 235 or 851, but still very serviceable. Fully charged batteries are rated at about 10-12 hrs. How long your battery lasts depends a lot on how much you broadcast. We typically use a fully charged battery for 3-4 days on trips. On trips, it is nice to have 1-2 fully charged extra batteries available. In the past 10 yrs, I've had 4 occasions where I used a VHF radio in emergency situations--1. a friend's powerboat sank; 2. needed help from friends with my disabled AI (rudder pin broke and a friend had my extra pins); 3. acted as middle man (used radio and phone) to get help for a disabled boat, which we could not see initially, but could communicate with; 4. called for emergency help for a 10-yr old child--belonged to a family on the beach--who had fallen into a camp fire about 9 pm. Park Rangers responded. He was taken to a hospital with severe burns on his legs, but he survived OK.

A SPOT and/or PLB (personal EPIRB) may save your life someday. Because of its "messaging" ability, SPOT gives your family lots of comfort to know you are OK on a serious trip.

A cell phone is also important. On trips over a couple days, you must put it on "airplane mode" so that it does not keep searching for a signal or a gps location. I usually turn my phone off. It still has battery power after a 7-day trip. Same goes for your tablet. Be sure to turn off any GPS or other search capabilities because those features will run it down in a few days. Again, I turn off my Samsung Tab 3 when not in use. If you need the GPS ("location") on those devices, only turn it on when you need it. Most phones and tablets are NOT water resistant (IPX0 or IPX1), so keep them in an AquaPac or Dry Pak bag along with keys, credit cards, & money.

Keith

PS If you are not familiar with the IPX codes for "water-resistance, waterproof" here is Wikipedia's listing:

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It is up to the designer/manufacturer to apply these codes. My SPOT, which is the original model, must be at least 4 yrs old and has never been protected. Carrying it in a low pocket on my PFD is the most protection it has ever had. For the first couple years, it was tethered on my AI and stored in one of the mesh pockets where it was awash with saltwater much of the time. It finally dawned on me that keeping it tethered to me could be more valuable in the event of a catastrophic accident. In any case, my SPOT has never failed me. Unfortunately, my Garmin GPS units have not done so well. After drowning a few "waterproof" Garmin GPS units & one Magellan, I quit putting them to the test. Both Nancy's and my Garmin units are in AquaPac or Dry Pak bags (they spend ALL their time there, except to change batteries.) They have worked flawlessly for yrs in those bags. My Uniden VHF radios have always been carried unprotected in my PFD. They have corroded and died over time, 4-5 yrs, but have worked very well in between.

Keith

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"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 9:04 pm 
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Wow, those are some really inspiring stories, and is a great reminder that sometimes the emergencies are about someone else. Being prepared might save someone else. As a former EMT, I will use guilt to rationalize my purchase :).

Thanks for the great information on marine radio types and recommendations. I am thinking about one that I can take diving (there is only one I know of that can withstand those depths). Not that I would be using it underwater, but in case I surface to nothing but ocean. As you implied, it doesn't do any good for them to find the boat if you're not in it. I'm also looking for a small box / bag that could protect my InReach at dive depths. I keep my iPhone in a dry box in the boat and keep it turned off unless using it. Coverage is a little spotty in some of the 10k islands we like to camp on (Helen Key is our favorite).

I keep a bunch of batteries with me as well. My InReach and iPhone are, of course, rechargeable, which I don't particularly like - BUT - I have been using a Biolite wood burning campstove for about a year and a half (love it) and am getting the biolite KettleCharge, so keeping them charged shouldn't be a problem. Might get a goal zero solar charger too, but I have to draw the line somewhere.

Anyway, thanks also for the vest photos. I too have learned to tether anything I don't want lost.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2014 10:40 am 
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Location: South Florida
Rene’s Excellent Adventure--Chokoloskee to Flamingo, Feb 8-14, 2011

Four of us did the Chokoloskee to Flamingo trip. I wrote it up and posted it on this thread. http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=7276&start=150

One member of our group, Rene Potvin, a Canadian, had brought his 2010 AI down from Montreal with the intention of sailing it back up to Montreal (1650 miles/2664 km.) He had very little experience and joining our group was intended to fill that void. Rene wrote up an excellent story of the trip, and it was published in Small Craft Advisor, Issue 81, 2013. Nancy thought Rene’s write-up was hilarious. Here is Rene’s story as it appeared in SCA. Note: Of the pictures in Rene's story, only the picture depicting 4 AIs on a beach (Scorpion Beach, ENP) was taken during our trip. The others were taken by Rene on his trip to Montreal.

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Rene is currently thinking of sailing from Miami to Mexico, another M&M trip—it should be sweet. http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=53465 I hope he has plenty of mashed potatoes.

Keith

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2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2014 1:05 pm 
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Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Keith, no matter how delighted I am with my Hobie Island experience, you epitomise the essence of "living the dream".

Keep the sotires coming please!

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2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker and Hangkai outboard
only cool people follow the (non-magnetic) titanium weight-loss program! lol.)


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 01, 2015 7:51 am 
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Thanks, Tony. I'm just trying to enjoy life and, if I can, make it a bit more enjoyable for others.

Good luck on getting your back straightened out this year--sooner than later.

Happy New Year!

Keith

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2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 4:38 am 
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Location: Salem, Oregon USA
With a tidal flat and old pilings that makes sailboat anchoring inaccessible, and with currents that make normal kayaks deterred, I found an incredible awesome beach, for myself, just beyond the droves of August campers just a little ways away (all footprints were mine). This was a Hobie Island Only paradise, only enjoyable to kayaks with sail, and what a sailing experience it was, so I give this video as my best TI experience of 2014, not the most dramatic, but the most enjoyable.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3RKOkG7NpUY&index=3&list=UUbZIWYAhKS59XJhUwbdzxIg

YakAttaque


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 11:50 am 
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Very nice video, YA, especially the last third. Do you have a Google Earth track of your trip? Coordinates of the island(s) you camped on?

You are not supposed to stir up an ulcer when camping with your Tandem. I hope it is back under control. Best wishes.

BTW, do you have video of those surf conditions? Launching?

Keith

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2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 6:53 am 
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Location: South Florida
Proposed major trip of year: Chokoloskee—Pavilion Key—Hog Key—Graveyard—MidCape Sable—Flamingo

This will be a 7 day trip: Start Feb 1, end Feb 7; option for a 3-day trip, Chok-PAV-Chok; option to extend the trip a day and sail across FL Bay to the WaterTribe Everglades Challenge finish at Bay Cove Motel. If you add the latter option, you can fairly say that you have done the 2 most difficult legs of the Everglades Challenge.

    Day 1—Chok to PAV, about 9 mi; Because of tides, we will launch from Chok at about 2:00 pm and make PAV about 5:30 or before. 6:08 pm sunset, so have your dinner plans ready (& easy.)

    Day 2—Relax, fish Pavilion Key, the “gem” of the Everglades; Fish fry tonight.

    Day 3—Sail on down to Hog Key, about 13 mi; option: some campers may head back to Chok.

    Day 4—Fish Hog Key/Lostmans River area; Fish sandwiches tonight. Full moon tonight.

    Day 5—Sail down to Graveyard (Scorpion Beach), about 15.5 mi

    Day 6—Sail to MidCape Sable, 16 mi

    Day 7—Sail to Flamingo, 15 mi. The End unless

    Day 8—Option: cross FL Bay, 32 mi. The Finish.

If you are interested in doing this trip or have questions, contact me ASAP. Post here, or email kwellma at gmail dot com, or call me 305-979-3362. My son & family usually help shuttling cars over to the end of the trip, but, if too many cars, we will simply bundle everyone up and take them back to Chok for their cars.

Keith

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2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


Last edited by Chekika on Wed Jan 14, 2015 12:11 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 7:47 am 
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Location: Houston, TX
Love the intro to your video YakAttaque. How much did you have to pay that dragonfly to do that?

Greg

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2016 AI - Spinn & Jib

“Out of sight of land the sailor feels safe. It is the beach that worries him.”
– Charles G. Davis

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 12:53 am 
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Location: Salem, Oregon USA
:)
Chekika wrote:
Very nice video, YA, especially the last third. Do you have a Google Earth track of your trip? Coordinates of the island(s) you camped on?

You are not supposed to stir up an ulcer when camping with your Tandem. I hope it is back under control. Best wishes.

BTW, do you have video of those surf conditions? Launching?

Keith


I had major problems with my GoPro on this trip, and on the trip afterwards. These were of course the most amazing moments of my life, but I think I've resolved the problem. I had two batteries (GoPro2 with BacPac) one was bad, when I switched thngs around to find the problem, the bad battery was still in the equation. I finally discovered the problem when trying to recharge it, isolated. So, no video of the fantastic moments of that trip.
I have recovered from the ulcer. What a stress, this is why this spot is left alone.
After the (incredible) season has ended, I reflect that my most enjoyable moment was in this spot, the most dangerous and close to home. I will return. :)


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 1:27 am 
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Location: Salem, Oregon USA
vetgam wrote:
Love the intro to your video YakAttaque. How much did you have to pay that dragonfly to do that?

Greg


It came from a clip on Klamath Lake Oregon. It is my fav so I made it my trademark. You can't improve upon nature!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZry0oO108A
YakAttaque


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2015 8:33 pm 
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Location: South Florida
How to Have Fun Camping in the Everglades—Chokoloskee to Pavilion Key

Jan 19-21, 2015


I’ve been telling the WaterTribe people that there was a different way to do the Everglades. “Come with us on a leisurely stroll, i.e., a paddle, pedal, or sail, along coastal Everglades,” I said. It happened on this trip. Everyone was a WaterTriber except for our special guest, Susan Cocking—reporter and outdoor columnist for the Miami Herald. Susan is a long-time friend, but this was the first time that she did a camping trip from a Hobie AI. This was only her second time sailing. We left Chokoloskee, at the northern end of Everglades National Park, and headed down through Chokoloskee Bay, through the passes to the Gulf of Mexico, and then made our way to Pavilion Key. We took the outside route.
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Royd Whedon and Susan on Chokoloskee Bay.
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A dolphin surfaces ahead of Royd in the pass to the Gulf of Mexico.
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Dolphin at work! “My, that was a tasty sea trout.”
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Susan on the Gulf of Mexico, about 1 mile from Pavilion Key, with a 12 mph headwind. It is 15 min before sunset.
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Joshua Morgan on Pavilion with his Kruger (actually, it is Royd’s Kruger on loan to Josh.) This picture was taken at almost the same time as that of Susan above.
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After dinner, Joe Slama and his nephew, Joe Cianciolo, enjoy the evening. We will all tell a few stories.
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Royd relaxing after dinner.
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The stories, jokes, and laughs went on so long that at 11:30 pm, I even had to tell the boys and girls that quiet time on the islands was 10 pm-6 am. They assured me that if they saw ranger coming, they would tone it down. They were still going strong, when I went to sleep.


Next morning the boys, Royd, Josh, and Joe, talk boats. Joe is holding his kite he tried to fly—w/o luck. Josh is a firefighter and must head back this morning.
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A collection of boats: Hobie Tandem, Kruger Canoe, Mohawk Canoe, Hobie AI.
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Josh demonstrates using the rear hatch of the Kruger. Susan is catching it all.
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Josh proves you can sleep in a Kruger.
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Reporter at work.
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Final preparations.
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Josh is heading out. The “Kruger” is the kayak, but the inflatable amas and sail are made by Balogh. It is a very capable sailing vessel and about as fast as the AI.
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This is our fishing day, and I am demonstrating how circle hooks work to catch fish in the side of the mouth. They are a great design to prevent unnecessary deaths of released fish.
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We were successful. It will be a blue-plate, fish sandwich special. Joe #2, me, Susan, and Royd.
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Another beautiful Pavilion sunset.
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We leave Pavilion today. The sun has just come up and is peeking under my ama. The Joeys are getting ready to entertain us all.
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Joe #1 demonstrates what happens to your tent on the islands if it is not staked properly.
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Here he is demonstrating how to move a canoe across a mud flat.
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How to execute a brace on a mud flat.
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Joe #1 demonstrates how to relax when stuck on a mud flat, while Joe #2 photographs the action.
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The boys are discussing who will sleep in the tent tonight. Susan takes it all in.
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Later in the morning, when the tide is just beginning to come in, we spot a bald eagle out on the flat.
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There he is.
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Close ups.
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Susan’s camp
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Leaving Pavilion: Joe #2 and Royd. A great day for paddling or pedaling. Hopefully the wind will freshen as the morning wears on.
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Susan and I left about an hour after the fellows above. We had a great incoming current as we traveled the passes. The current moved us along at about 5-6 mph. Once we were in Chokoloskee Bay, there was a nice WSW wind that sped us along smoothly. We arrived back at the landing at the same time as the boys, Joe #1 and Joe #2. Royd, in his Tandem, got in ahead of all of us.

Great trip. These WaterTribers are really a fun bunch—they just have to learn to relax and enjoy the outdoors while they are camping. Maybe now that they see what fun they can have, they will join us again. With Joe Slama, you are bound to be entertained.

Credits: All pictures were taken by someone on this trip.
Entertainment provided by the Joey Boys, Un-Inc.

Keith

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2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


Last edited by Chekika on Sat Jan 24, 2015 2:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 3:41 am 
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I enjoyed reading that Keith. Great pics and report, once again! 8)


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 5:59 pm 
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Thanks again Keith. Great trip report. How many Pavilion trips does that make it ? Even though the sun was up, your clothes tell me that it wasn't throwing out much heat.

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