Return to Hobie.com
Hobie Forums
It is currently Mon Sep 23, 2019 11:46 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 3:20 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 11:25 am
Posts: 3
I live in Northern Michigan and bought and AI last summer (2014). Our lake temp. rarely gets above 60 and air temp is rarely above 70 even in the heat of summer. I'd like to extend the season and be more comfortable when it's warmer but I need different clothes - I froze to death last summer. I tried a light weight wet suit with boots (left over from windsurfing days) but but it didn't protect from the wind and I was always wet from sitting in water. It was also a hassle to get in and out of. I finally tried thicker neoprene fishing waders with a waterproof rain jacket and this worked better but was cumbersome and hot especially when I wanted to paddle and sail. I see a lot of you posting from Colorado, Alaska, the Pacific NW, upstate NY, and even Northern Michigan. What do you wear to stay warm, dry and extend the sailing season?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 4:09 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 2882
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Firstly, I do not suffer from extreme cold here (I can sail year round, mostly wearing shorts!) but I bought a pair of Caddis breathable waders. They weabout $130, but make for a really good outer layer. They are certainly not bulky, being made from material not much thicker than shirt material, and you can then wear whatever clothing you like underneath to deal with the cold. (http://www.caddiswaders.com/) Here are samples of the women's offerings.
ImageImage

I bought the model with inbuilt 6mm thick neoprene booties, and you could wear thick socks etc underneath. I added a pair of oversize "roman" sandals with velcro straps to avoid damaging the booties while launching etc.

The waders come up chest high, and if you add a warm waterproof jacket, gloves and a beanie, you should be good to go in most weather.

_________________
Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:15 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2012 10:16 pm
Posts: 150
Location: Belmont. NC
I prefer these Kokotat pants with a splash top. More comfortable then waders, keeps the splash out and allows me to wade for launching from a trailer without getting wet. I ware slightly larger water shoes with them.

http://www.rei.com/product/849522/kokat ... B6657-3C75


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 6:11 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 3319
Location: South Florida
I love the dry pants that Drewyaker posted a link for. In addition, I use an I-cushion on top of the standard seat to keep my butt out of the water. I remove the drain plugs on Day One so water can drain--I never put them back. Of course, I live in FL and that makes a difference. If you are really going to sail in cold weather, you are almost required to get a serious dry suit (Gore-Tex). Wet suits are never going to work, because the wind keeps wicking the water and your body heat away.

Keith

_________________
2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein

"Less is more" Anon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 6:12 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:57 am
Posts: 244
Location: Fairfax, CA USA
Sounds like your conditions are like ours here in northern California. Water temps usually around 55, air around 65. Most of the folks I fish/ sail with wear a kokatat paddle suit with lightweight fleece bottoms, wool or poly socks and a bootie. The paddle suit has latex gaskets on the sleeves, but a neoprene gasket on the neck. For guys there's a relief zipper, don't know if they make a version for women, but suspect they do.
Dress for immersion, as those water temps mean that if something went bad you don't have much time in the water before you are basically useless....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 6:33 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 11:25 am
Posts: 3
Chekika - what's an I-cushion? You said you use it to keep your butt out of the water? I've already tried removing my drain plugs but once the seat is wet, it stays wet.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 7:02 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 11:25 am
Posts: 3
Drewyaker - what splash top do you recommend to go with the pants?

Also, any recommendations on gloves - my fingers are my weakest link.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 11:47 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 2882
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Drewyaker wrote:
I prefer these Kokotat pants with a splash top. More comfortable then waders, keeps the splash out and allows me to wade for launching from a trailer without getting wet. I ware slightly larger water shoes with them.

http://www.rei.com/product/849522/kokat ... B6657-3C75

The Caddis waders are not like traditional thick waders, but are made of very similar material to the Kokatats, so would not be less comfoptable.

_________________
Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 5:34 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 3319
Location: South Florida
susanemohr wrote:
Chekika - what's an I-cushion? You said you use it to keep your butt out of the water? I've already tried removing my drain plugs but once the seat is wet, it stays wet.

I had the name a bit wrong. It is I-Comfort Seat by Hobie. http://www.kayakshed.com/hobie-kayak-gear/Hobie-seat-pad-inflatable-Icomfort

BTW, it is a wet ride, can't avoid that if there is any wind. Always letting the water drain out and raising your seat a bit helps keep you from sitting in a pool of water. Also, my hands get cold. Again the problem is the wind wicking away heat as it blows water off your wet gloves. In addition to wearing some simple water gloves, I purchased & wear a pair of cheap plastic gloves, very water proof, from Home Depot. They are large for easy slipping on and off. They are not inherently warm, but they protect your hands from the wind. Link: http://www.homedepot.com/p/West-Chester-Large-PVC-Coated-Chemical-Work-Gloves-HD12090-FALHHSP/100398987 I'm sure there are others.

Keith

_________________
2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein

"Less is more" Anon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 9:56 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2012 10:16 pm
Posts: 150
Location: Belmont. NC
susanemohr wrote:
Drewyaker - what splash top do you recommend to go with the pants?

Also, any recommendations on gloves - my fingers are my weakest link.


Most of the time, I can get away with a splash top. Mine is also Kokotat. Also have a Bomber Gear dry top, but rarely use it because most of the splash only reaches my legs.

For gloves, if finger numbing cold, I'll ware latex hospital gloves under neoprene gloves.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2015 12:41 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Sun May 25, 2014 4:35 am
Posts: 108
Location: Colombo, Sri Lanka
Wetsuits with no fabric on the outside work fine for me down to about 60 F or a bit less. Neoprene doesn't wick body heat away and if it's black any sun at all will heat it up. Surfers or windsurfers wetsuits work. Freediving wetsuits can be good too with the fabric on the inside. Pure neoprene wetsuits without fabric tear too easily

_________________
Simon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2015 1:24 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 3319
Location: South Florida
siravingmon wrote:
Wetsuits with no fabric on the outside work fine for me down to about 60 F or a bit less. Neoprene doesn't wick body heat away and if it's black any sun at all will heat it up. Surfers or windsurfers wetsuits work. Freediving wetsuits can be good too with the fabric on the inside. Pure neoprene wetsuits without fabric tear too easily

You may be right, Simon, but long ago I quit wearing neoprene-type gloves because my hands were freezing--temps were probably 60 deg and below. Also, I always wear neoprene booties or boots. Again, when the temps get in the 50's, my feet are freezing, so much so, that I've been known to wear plastic garbage bags around my feet early mornings. Plastic bags over neoprene booties make your feet toasty warm.

We may not have any disagreement. You seem to be talking temps above 60 deg. I'm saying neoprene alone is bad in temps below 60 deg. The older I get, the more that cold feeling creeps above 60 deg. Neoprene by itself has never worked well for me.

Nowadays, I have the dry pants mentioned by Drewyaker above. Those with socks and slightly oversized neoprene boots keep my feet warm. On top I wear a Kokatat jacket with neoprene neck closure and latex wrist closures. Again, Gore-Tex does not keep you warm, especially if it is windy, much the same problem as neoprene. If it is really cool/cold due to wind and water, I will wear a wind-breaker over my Kokatat jacket. I guess the key is, as usual, layering. You have to have things, especially on top, which can be added and removed.

Keith

_________________
2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein

"Less is more" Anon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2015 7:04 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Sun May 25, 2014 4:35 am
Posts: 108
Location: Colombo, Sri Lanka
I suspect we're talking about two different things. I wear just neoprene (with a fabric inner lining) down to 50 degrees Fahrenheit air temp and about 60 water temp, but not fabric covered neoprene . As you say, this makes you colder. Gloves and boots are a good example of this T hese always have fabric on the outside. This retains a lot of water, so the evaporation wicks heat away from your body. Neoprene gloves in particular are also usually quite tight, which restricts circulation, making things worse.
Uncoated neoprene, on the other hand, tends to shed water instantly, and being black absorbs any heat from any sunshine there may be immediately

_________________
Simon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 1:27 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 3319
Location: South Florida
There is a thread on the WaterTribe site discussing wet vs dry. These people really do use these things.
http://watertribe.org/forums/topic/wet-suit-vs-dry-suit

Keith

_________________
2015 AI 2, 2014 Tandem

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein

"Less is more" Anon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:46 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2011 12:57 pm
Posts: 235
Location: Delaware
I visited Marquette decades ago. I wouldn't dream about going out in those waters without a drysuit. To each their own. I have the Kokatat that coachstevo mentions - don't think I could handle a latex gasket around my neck.

I admit though that I avoid exerting myself paddling or pedalling wearing it. Even though it is Goretex, I still heat up quickly in it. I also don't like putting all the extra wear and tear on it given it's price.

Fingers have been my hardest thing to keep warm as well. I tried neoprene gloves and hated them. I have ended up using brown jersey gloves most of the time. I take them off when I have to get my hands wet and put them back on when I dry my hands. If conditions get to where I can't keep my hands dry, I use Home Depot gloves as Chekika does but a slightly different model and just slide them over my jersey gloves. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Grease-Monkey-PVC-Coated-Extra-Large-Multipurpose-Gloves-23408-08/202638586 Granted I'll be sorry if I ever end up overboard using the jersey gloves, I don't think they will help much even inside of the rubber gloves. I may switch from jersey to polartec gloves next winter, they should do a better job when wet.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
© Hobie Cat Company. All rights reserved.
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group