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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:30 pm 
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Location: Northern California
What is your max wind experience and what is the max limit you will go out in?

Hubby and I had a wild 35 minute TI sail today. Also the shortest ride yet! Normally we would not go out in today's snotty conditions, but we went on a camping trip with the intent of sailing today, so we did. Forecast was 15 kts and gusting 22. I checked recorded data afterwards and in my experience it was about right but looked and felt a little heavier (knowing these conditions keelboat racing in heavy weather and at anchor in this region in up to 35 kt gusts).

We started at 20 with gusts to 25, reaching. We went out 3/4 reefed. A couple more turns and better, less mast bend, better control. Down river too. Water temp was 58f and all I have on are slip on shoes and my sailing foulie bibs and a tshirt. I was freezing within 10 minutes, got really wet . Thankfully it was sunny and 70f+ air temps. I don't have a wetsuit, hubs does, nor dry suits, just sailing foulies.

It was a winding river so we got each point of sail in. We called it quits when heading upwind when it was blowing steady at 27 kts and gusting to 33 and we had a knot of current against us. Top speed was 7.3. My personal best was 8.7, alone (hubs weighs 250#) in 20, gusts to 26 kts. I may have continued if I were alone. I feel the additional weight made me nervous some. Also, we had the tramps rolled up so no hiking and we don't have hakas yet. Would we have been fine if we had hakas? We are experienced dinghy, small - big boat sailors with several racing seasons too.

Got home 2 hours later, took a bath, hands were pins and needles for a few minutes...a little frost nip...had fun though and it's always nice to be out on the TI.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 2:47 am 
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Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Those conditions sound about the same as my upper limits. I think people tend to underestimate the special capability of bering able to reef that sail. My fastest (and most exciting!) sail in my TI was when the clew was not much more than 3 feet from the mast, and that little handkerchief of a sail had the bow firing into each wave and momentarily lying under a thin sheet of water, until said water arrived into the cockpit.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:28 am 
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Location: Northern California
So you pretty much just had the third batten out, right?
Yup, we are in very similar sailing grounds, SF Bay and Sydney areas definitely share some similar sailing demographics.
When ya entering the Sydney-Hobart? Haaa! Could you imagine a TI doing that race?!

You have a youtube channel, right Tony? Got a vid of that day? I am always looking to improve my Island sailing skills.
Without a boom I feel like I am still a little lost at times with telltale trim signs, more used to sailing cat rig dinghies with a boom, ya know. However, it is a lot like just sailing the big boat with just the jib, no main. On the Island I am directly below it, not 40' aft looking straight at it.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:21 pm 
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I reached my limits in an unpredicted, sudden thunderstorm with winds gusting to 25-30 kts and waves of three to four feet. I thought I could handle it and was trying to sail back to the loading dock. After about 50 minutes of intense sailing I thought I was going to make it when a huge gust came within a few degrees of capsizing my TI. It was too sudden to do much about it but instincts kicked in and I managed to turn the boat just enough to bring it back down within seconds of a capsize right near a rock cliff. That drained all my courage and I made a beeline for the nearest shore arriving cold, soaked, and shivering. This was the first time I did not make it back to my destination.

I abandoned the boat on the beach and walked five miles back to my car in the storm. That day gave me a new respect for the forces of nature.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:17 pm 
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Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
Sailorv wrote:
...Also, we had the tramps rolled up so no hiking and we don't have hakas yet. Would we have been fine if we had hakas?


Haka definitely help when the wind gets up a bit. Furling is the key, but you can have a bit more sail out when hiked out.
If you want to solo and hike out make sure you make your haka cantilever over the rear aka to about the rear drivewell. That’s the best position for boat balance when soloing.
The ideal wind speed for unfurled Islands is around 10-15knots. Definitely furl at >20knots. The boat becomes a handful at >25 knots despite a furled sail, with windage on the hull/ama/mast coming into play.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 7:52 pm 
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Location: South Florida
pro10is wrote:
I reached my limits in an unpredicted, sudden thunderstorm with winds gusting to 25-30 kts and waves of three to four feet. I thought I could handle it and was trying to sail back to the loading dock. After about 50 minutes of intense sailing I thought I was going to make it when a huge gust came within a few degrees of capsizing my TI. It was too sudden to do much about it but instincts kicked in and I managed to turn the boat just enough to bring it back down within seconds of a capsize right near a rock cliff. That drained all my courage and I made a beeline for the nearest shore arriving cold, soaked, and shivering. This was the first time I did not make it back to my destination.

I abandoned the boat on the beach and walked five miles back to my car in the storm. That day gave me a new respect for the forces of nature.

Thanks for relating your story. Good reminder to the more experienced of us...don't take weather lightly; it may just take a bite out of you.

Keith

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:39 pm 
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The problem I experience when the winds pick up to 20-25 kts or more is that the sail becomes very difficult to furl with all the wind tension on it. You have to first steer into the wind to deflate it which can be quite tricky with only two hands, one trying to hold the rudder steady in high winds/waves and the other trying to furiously furl the sail while it's flapping wildly in the wind. It can be done of course but it takes some practice and skill, and in such conditions there is little room for error.

It's best to furl the sail at the first sign that the winds are picking up, even before you think you need to.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 4:49 am 
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Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
pro10is wrote:
SNIP
It's best to furl the sail at the first sign that the winds are picking up, even before you think you need to.

That is the very essence of good seamanship, and applies to all sized sailing vessels

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2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker and Hangkai outboard
only cool people follow the (non-magnetic) titanium weight-loss program! lol.)


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:03 am 
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Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Sailorv wrote:
So you pretty much just had the third batten out, right?
Yup, we are in very similar sailing grounds, SF Bay and Sydney areas definitely share some similar sailing demographics.
When ya entering the Sydney-Hobart? Haaa! Could you imagine a TI doing that race?!

You have a youtube channel, right Tony? Got a vid of that day? I am always looking to improve my Island sailing skills.
Without a boom I feel like I am still a little lost at times with telltale trim signs, more used to sailing cat rig dinghies with a boom, ya know. However, it is a lot like just sailing the big boat with just the jib, no main. On the Island I am directly below it, not 40' aft looking straight at it.

No Sydney Hobarts, but I recall a guy with a Seawind 24 cat, who was refused entry to the 150NM Adelaide-Port Lincoln yacht race, so he started 2 hours aftrer the fleet, and was first to arrive, singelehanded! he once took me for a sail, and when he pulled on the mainsheet, I fell over backwards!
Image
Unfortunately, I don't have aby heavy weather TI videos, as it is always way to busy to think about cameras!

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2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker and Hangkai outboard
only cool people follow the (non-magnetic) titanium weight-loss program! lol.)


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:15 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2017 11:01 am
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Location: Northern California
Thanks for all your comments guys.

Pro10, wow what a lesson! Thanks for sharing it. Mother nature has a way of humbling us huh?
That 5 mile walk sounded awfully long and cold.
Btw, I know what you about furling with a lot of tension. As soon as I see it start billowing at the luff I quickly pinch or fall off and take in a couple of turns. I follow the adage reef early and study the hell out of wind forecasts and shoreside landscape to figure out shadowing. Keeping a pair of small binoculars is also good for reading the wind further ahead.

Tony, yeah that sounds like a Seawind. Dream cruising catamaran (33'+) for sure. That's pretty cool how he showed em....first to cross two hours after start. A friend has done several Hobarts....you couldn't pay me to do one...a nasty race.


Guys, I really wanna hit 10 kts, I think what I need is:

18kts, gusting to 25.
Broad reach
Half furled
Board mostly up
Out on the tramp, leaning behind the aka bar by ama with a hiking stick

Or am I wrong?

I did this w/o stick and not as far out on the stbd tramp when I hit 8.7, no stick, steered with my foot/toes.

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