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PostPosted: Wed Sep 25, 2019 7:19 am 
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I recently bought a used 2015 TI, with the intention of using it for trips of 1-2 weeks, on the great lakes in Ontario Canada and the Atlantic coast. I've done lots of tripping in kayaks in these areas.

Appreciate help with the following questions:

1) I have followed the posts by others on improving the water tightness of the hull. It is much better now but maybe not completely tight yet. When camping do you manage to keep the hull pretty much dry inside or do you always have to pack in immersion-proof dry bags?

2) It's easy to lose things in that large space inside the hull. How do you cope with this?

3) If I jam lots of gear in tight, it tends to interfer with the rudder lines. Any strategies?

4) The polyethylene foam float blocks seem to be mostly loose in the hull. Should they be glued down? If so where?

thanks experienced expedition campers - I look forward to your replies!


Last edited by Iank on Fri Sep 27, 2019 5:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 25, 2019 9:03 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
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Location: High Point, NC
The majority of my Hobie's don't leak a drop inside the hull, but I would never take the chance on important items somehow getting wet. Always put your stuff in a water-tight bag.

To keep items from getting lost inside the hull, attach tethers to them and fasten the tethers to either the mast base or perhaps one of the easily reached scupper tubes.

You can cut flotation blocks into various sized pieces and use GOOP to fasten them inside the hull. If you locate them strategically, you can sort of block those areas where other gear might otherwise tangle or interfere with your rudder lines.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 25, 2019 9:07 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 3:13 pm
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My 2 cents, you may get better answers:

1) I have followed the posts by others on improving the water tightness of the hull. It is much better now but maybe not completely tight yet. When camping do you manage to keep the hull pretty much dry inside or do you always have to pack in immersion-proof dry bags?

Yes, definitely, dry bags are a must for anything that can't get wet.

2) It's easy to loose things in that large space inside the hull. How do you cope with this?

I use paracords which I attach to the bags. If they get lost inside the hull, I just pull them out by the attached cord.

3) If I jam lots of gear in tight, it tends to interfer with the rudder lines. Any strategies?

Store any items which may interfere with the rudder lines in the front.

4) The polyethylene foam float blocks seem to be mostly loose in the hull. Should they be glued down? If so where?

You really can't glue anything well to polyethylene, it's too slippery for most glues. The foam blocks may move around a bit but that won't hurt them or their purpose.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 26, 2019 4:11 am 
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Tom Kirkman wrote:
The majority of my Hobie's don't leak a drop inside the hull, but I would never take the chance on important items somehow getting wet. Always put your stuff in a water-tight bag.

To keep items from getting lost inside the hull, attach tethers to them and fasten the tethers to either the mast base or perhaps one of the easily reached scupper tubes.

You can cut flotation blocks into various sized pieces and use GOOP to fasten them inside the hull. If you locate them strategically, you can sort of block those areas where other gear might otherwise tangle or interfere with your rudder lines.


Thanks Tom! I'm encouraged to hear your boats don't leak a drop. I always pack critical things like sleeping bags in dry bags, but it would be nice to use lighter protection for other misc. stuff. I'll work on a tether system.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 26, 2019 10:36 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 2887
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Given lightweight drybags can be purchased these days for almost pennies, I see no reason at all to place anything inside an Island's hull that is not protected in a drybag. Every time my local outlet releases a 3-pack for $9.99 (5, 15 and 25 litre sizes), I buy another set (or two). I now have enough that I can fill the volume of my TI with items inside drybags, plus I also have a couple of giant 40+ litre heavy duty ones which can be stowed outside if needed for big trips.

In my opinion, it is now hardly worth the energy to carry out a "fight to the death" to prevent the last drop of water entering the hull, when such clever solutions as drybags are so cheap and convenient.

PS I keep, on deck secured on deck behind the seat, two other drybags. One is my "ditchbag" which contains flares, compass, torch,sea-marker dye, first aid kit, PLB, space blanket, knife and other tools etc, while the other one contains small Cooper anchor, shackles 3 metres of chain, 25 metres anchor line, sea anchor etc (I have a further 10 metres permanently attached to the TI bow and led back to the cockpit)

_________________
Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker


Last edited by tonystott on Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2019 4:52 pm 
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pro10is wrote:
My 2 cents, you may get better answers:

1) I have followed the posts by others on improving the water tightness of the hull. It is much better now but maybe not completely tight yet. When camping do you manage to keep the hull pretty much dry inside or do you always have to pack in immersion-proof dry bags?

Yes, definitely, dry bags are a must for anything that can't get wet.

2) It's easy to loose things in that large space inside the hull. How do you cope with this?

I use paracords which I attach to the bags. If they get lost inside the hull, I just pull them out by the attached cord.

3) If I jam lots of gear in tight, it tends to interfer with the rudder lines. Any strategies?

Store any items which may interfere with the rudder lines in the front.

4) The polyethylene foam float blocks seem to be mostly loose in the hull. Should they be glued down? If so where?

You really can't glue anything well to polyethylene, it's too slippery for most glues. The foam blocks may move around a bit but that won't hurt them or their purpose.

Thanks Pro10 - very helpful.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2019 5:03 pm 
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tonystott wrote:
Given lightweight drybags can be purchased these days for almost pennies, I see no reason at all to place anything inside an Island's hull that is not protected in a drybag. Every time my local outlet releases a 3-pack for $9.99 (5, 15 and 25 litre sizes), I buy another set (or two). I now have enough that I can fill the volume of my TI with items inside drybags, plus I also have a couple of giant 40+ litre heavy duty ones which can be stowed outside if needed for big trips.

In my opinion, it is no longer hardly worth the energy to carry out a "fight to the death" to prevent the last drop of water entering the hull, when such clever solutions as drybags are so cheap and convenient.

PS I keep, on deck secured on deck behind the seat, two other drybags. One is my "ditchbag" which contains flares, compass, torch,sea-marker dye, first aid kit, PLB, space blanket, knife and other tools etc, while the other one contains small Cooper anchor, shackles 3 metres of chain, 25 metres anchor line, sea anchor etc (I have a further 10 metres permanently attached to the TI bow and led back to the cockpit)


Thanks Tony! I am used to paddle kayaking and I have a ditch bag there too, but I like your list of contents. There is more room on the TI.
Are you using the small red Cooper Anchor or the larger blue one?
Can you recommend a sea anchor? (FYI: I carried a folding radar reflector for my paddle kayak for use if caught in fog.)
My dry bags are mostly heavy vinyl and they don't fit easily in the hull, except the front hatch. I'll invest in some lighter ones.
(I pressurized the hull with a vacuum cleaner on 'blow' and found several sizable leaks with soap spray.)
ik


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:25 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 2887
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Iank wrote:
snip

Thanks Tony! I am used to paddle kayaking and I have a ditch bag there too, but I like your list of contents. There is more room on the TI.
Are you using the small red Cooper Anchor or the larger blue one?
Can you recommend a sea anchor? (FYI: I carried a folding radar reflector for my paddle kayak for use if caught in fog.)
My dry bags are mostly heavy vinyl and they don't fit easily in the hull, except the front hatch. I'll invest in some lighter ones.
(I pressurized the hull with a vacuum cleaner on 'blow' and found several sizable leaks with soap spray.)
ik


I use the blue one.
My sea anchor is a locally made kevlar one about two feet long.
Dry bags don't need to be heavy weight material unless big volume ones. Smaller ones also fit in more spaces in the hull.

On a three hour offshore trip, my TI gained a pint or two of water inside, but really, as soon as it is a cupful or so, you need everything in drybags IMO.(BTW, on one trip, a jar of instant coffee came undone, so everything in the hull was covered with salt-flavoured coffee. lovely!)

_________________
Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM" with Hobie spinnaker


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 30, 2019 3:13 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 10, 2014 6:20 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Pula - Sardinia
I disagree with who said that most hulls don't get a drop of water. I think it's exactly the contrary and things will probably go worse with years passing by.
The suggestion to put almost everything in dry bags is a good one, but you will have to manage the dimensions of the bags and the dimensions of the hatches.
though the front hatch is very big, the 3 black hatches are small. Could be better to separate things and use smaller, possible longer bags so that they can enter inside the small hatches.
consider also using the tramps for strorage. I also use a crater that I put in the space behing the rear seat though this posizion has the disadvantage to reduce the drainage of the water in the stern.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 30, 2019 1:44 pm 
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Yes, I'm surprised at the comment about most of these boats staying dry inside.

I bailed out about 50 litres of seawater when I returned from a trip the other weekend. Admittedly the seas were very heavy, and the bow spent a good amount of time with waves coming completely over the top.

I might have to check the seals on my hatches and rudder lines...


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 30, 2019 5:46 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
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Location: High Point, NC
My Hobies, and I have several, remain dry as a bone inside, even in heavy water and high winds. But as I also stated, I would never trust a dry hull when important items for camping are at stake. Again, put anything and everything you want to stay dry in a good quality dry bag.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2019 8:08 pm 
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forsythem wrote:
Yes, I'm surprised at the comment about most of these boats staying dry inside.

I bailed out about 50 litres of seawater when I returned from a trip the other weekend. Admittedly the seas were very heavy, and the bow spent a good amount of time with waves coming completely over the top.

I might have to check the seals on my hatches and rudder lines...


50 litres in 3 hours is an awful lot of water. I have done quite a bit of work on waterproofing and I'll boast about it, and tell how I did it, AFTER I go out in heavy water and see how it does..


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2019 2:34 pm 
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Iank wrote:
forsythem wrote:
Yes, I'm surprised at the comment about most of these boats staying dry inside.

I bailed out about 50 litres of seawater when I returned from a trip the other weekend. Admittedly the seas were very heavy, and the bow spent a good amount of time with waves coming completely over the top.

I might have to check the seals on my hatches and rudder lines...


50 litres in 3 hours is an awful lot of water. I have done quite a bit of work on waterproofing and I'll boast about it, and tell how I did it, AFTER I go out in heavy water and see how it does..


Yes, I was quite shocked at how much water I had in there. Been out in calmer seas, and had nowhere near that amount of water. Was out on Sunday for 5 hours and hardly a drop - but then only had 2 or 3 waves break over the bow.

I'm thinking I may not have had a hatch shut properly that last time...


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