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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 12:20 pm 
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@Husse0416 I just tried to help, that's all. It's something I tried after looking into it, and it worked. It's not like I suggested a $300 fix and you all want my theory explained before spending that much cash; I'd understand that. It's $5 people.

You got some people here that rather than saying 'thank you', they love being complete dicks (pmmpete). Guess you all have masters in physics -- good for you.

You're free not to take my advice. Simple enough.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 5:49 pm 
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Filippodg, thanks for sharing your information. I suspect some here are taking issue with the explanation rather than the result. When we observe something it's natural to look for a reason why. I like mmiller's reason:
mmiller wrote:
Are they wedged into the aft area which is expanding the structure (keeping it full)? That would increase buoyancy possibly. If the hull compresses (under waterline) that would decrease buoyancy.
The pool noodles look like a tight fit in the Outback sponsons back in that rear hatch area. By expanding the sides a modest amount (or keeping them expanded in the water, the boat would gain volume and the rear deck would sit higher. If so, this is a great potential improvement.

One of the Outback's weak points IMO is that the center of weight sits behind the center of lift. Add weight to the cargo area and the boat squats before it even goes anywhere, as Howie's picture on pg. 1 shows (bow practically out of the water, stern low). WAVERIDER suggested a great remedy -- counterbalance with weight in the bow (or transfer some of the weight forward). Batteries, wheels, caught fish are good candidates. The boat always performs best (and drains best) when sitting on its lines (essentially level). Adding weight doesn't affect your boat's performance by much, but how you distribute it has everything to do with performance and stability. 8)


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 10:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:46 am
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Location: Sweden, sjöbo
filippodg wrote:
@Husse0416 I just tried to help, that's all. It's something I tried after looking into it, and it worked. It's not like I suggested a $300 fix and you all want my theory explained before spending that much cash; I'd understand that. It's $5 people.

You got some people here that rather than saying 'thank you', they love being complete dicks (pmmpete). Guess you all have masters in physics -- good for you.

You're free not to take my advice. Simple enough.



I am so sorry that you take offence about getting some well deserved critisism about this "fix" of yours that I (and I guess lots of others on the forum) render totally useless.
Unless you add volume to the outside of the hull you can not increase the bouancy this way!

And its not about the cost, its a matter of understanding that just loosly "popping in" pool noodles has no affect at all on the boyancy of the kayak. A bad advice is simly a bad advice. Sure it would have been even worse if it had cost $300 but thats not the point is it?!

I do not understand how you notice that this makes a difference? Maybe its just a "feeling" you get and this might work for you.... but its not an advice that should be passed on as a fix to this problem.
you are stating to get a 3 inch higher ride in the back... that would approximately account for an increase boyance of about 50Lbs in the rear. Sorry but I do not believe this to be true.

What might have some positive effect on the boyancy is to press in some pieces of foam inside the hull to press down/lower the plastic bottom of the hull a little and so making the outside volume in the rear a little bigger.
But if I got your descriprion correct this is not what you did with the pool noddles in your kayak? As I understand your description and pics they were loosley placed inside... or did I missunderstand this?

Anyway my intension is surely not to offend you ...
For instance I never called you a "dick" or any other derogatory statement as you just did in your last post.... very bad form mate!!
But the fact that you clearly state that you somehow managed to overcome the laws of psysics (in this case Archimedes' principle) is a bit hilarious so forgive me if I have some fun!
If you post on a forum you must be prepared to get opposed by others and also prove your Point.... if you have one...
:D

All the best!
/Gustav

_________________
Sailing my TI and fishing.... thats bliss!!


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 11:23 am 
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Location: Escondido
I followed up on filippodg's pool noddle idea and found that it was pretty good after all. Our boats compress slightly when on the water, even more when we add our combined body and gear weight. This varies by model and location on the boat, but you can verify this by marking the hull depth with a stick, 1) inverted, 2) on the water empty and 3) on the water loaded. Rather than stuffing pool noodles on the sides to rigidify the hull, I made some noodle columns (kept from bowing with skewers). This accomplished two things on the project TI: 1) supporting existing areas that were flexing, and 2) decompressing some areas that had sagged over the years sitting upright in cradles. The columns were held in position with silicone calk. Here's what they look like:

Image

Image

The results were noticeable. There was less squatting in the stern (indicated by how much rudder was showing at prescribed speed) and the bow stayed down, so the boat rode more level than before. Your results may vary depending on weight, location of weight, and individual boat design. 8)

Filippodg made himself vulnerable by attempting to explain his results and a few armchair critics here took full advantage of this, missing the positive outcome all together. That's unfortunate -- filippodg has not returned to the forum since. To filippodg -- thanks for the idea -- it was very useful. Don't let a few "dicks" discourage you from contributing to the forum; every forum seems to have some! :roll:


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 6:43 am 
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2016 1:27 am
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Comparing my old 2006 adventure side by side with my 2016 revo 16, the old yak sits a noticeable inch or so lower on the ground, obviously due to sagging with age. No doubt this loss of volume has an effect on load carrying capacity even if only minimal, especially in the rear which has no vertical bracing. It at least means the bottom of the tankwell is closer to water level, hence submerges sooner when underway.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2017 10:07 am 
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[quote="Roadrunner" Rather than stuffing pool noodles on the sides to rigidify the hull, I made some noodle columns (kept from bowing with skewers). This accomplished two things on the project TI: 1) supporting existing areas that were flexing, and 2) decompressing some areas that had sagged over the years sitting upright in cradles. The columns were held in position with silicone calk. [/quote]

Roadrunner, what did you use as the skewers to stop the columns from bowing?


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2017 9:24 pm 
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sebby wrote:
Roadrunner, what did you use as the skewers to stop the columns from bowing?
I had these bamboo skewers laying around. They are about 8" x 1/8" and look like this:

Image

They run about $2 for a package of 100 at a party supply store or maybe Walmart, etc. Call first as they may be seasonal.

After fitting the final length of the pool noodles, I slip 3 in triangle formation in the pillars, cutting them about 1" shorter than the pillar to allow for compression, as applicable. This stiffens them without interfering with their support function. I used whatever pool noodles I had laying around but if you have a choice, solid is better than hollow (holds their shape better). 8)


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2017 6:18 am 
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@Roadrunner thanks!


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2018 8:57 am 
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Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2018 8:47 am
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Roadrunner wrote:
I followed up on filippodg's pool noddle idea and found that it was pretty good after all. Our boats compress slightly when on the water, even more when we add our combined body and gear weight. This varies by model and location on the boat, but you can verify this by marking the hull depth with a stick, 1) inverted, 2) on the water empty and 3) on the water loaded. Rather than stuffing pool noodles on the sides to rigidify the hull, I made some noodle columns (kept from bowing with skewers). This accomplished two things on the project TI: 1) supporting existing areas that were flexing, and 2) decompressing some areas that had sagged over the years sitting upright in cradles. The columns were held in position with silicone calk. Here's what they look like:

Image

Image

The results were noticeable. There was less squatting in the stern (indicated by how much rudder was showing at prescribed speed) and the bow stayed down, so the boat rode more level than before. Your results may vary depending on weight, location of weight, and individual boat design. 8)

Filippodg made himself vulnerable by attempting to explain his results and a few armchair critics here took full advantage of this, missing the positive outcome all together. That's unfortunate -- filippodg has not returned to the forum since. To filippodg -- thanks for the idea -- it was very useful. Don't let a few "dicks" discourage you from contributing to the forum; every forum seems to have some! :roll:



This is very interesting. I’m 6’3” and hover around 300 pounds. I don’t bring a lot of gear, maybe a milk crate, couple small tackle boxes and at max 3 rods. But being so big i do nice that when i peddle water does flow out of the rear cargo area and over the hatch. I do find water inside but i always make sure drain after every use. I’m going to give this a shot and the next warm day we have up here in NY i will take it for a test run. Thanks for the idea Roadrunner!


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