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PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 4:18 pm 
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I've been under the impression that when folks have been building PVC cradles for their PA's that they've used schedule 80 pipe so there's more strength to it. I'm ready to build a cradle for my pickup rack but when I went to find the pipe I found that not only was schedule 80 much more hard to find, but it's outrageously expensive.

Any thoughts on this? Is schedule 40 strong enough or should I spend the bucks on the heavier stuff?

As a side note, I mistakenly bought schedule 40 when I rebuilt my trailer. Although it's been used very little since then, it's holding up fine so far. I planned on replacing it too until I got the price on the 80.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 4:29 pm 
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When I originated the idea of building lengthwise PVC bunks for the PA, my desire in doing do was to have pieces that flexed and conformed to the hull. That is the whole point of doing this. So once you move to PVC that is stiffer than the hull, making the hull conform to the PVC, the whole purpose is defunct. I'd stick to 40 and doubt you'd have any trouble with it. I've been using it for years on my PA and have yet to need to replace any of it.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:46 pm 
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I agree with Tom using Schedule 40.
For the past 4 years, my 2013 PA-14 is doing "just fine" sitting on top of Schedule 40, on my Hobie Trailex trailer.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 11:00 pm 
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All my stuff is schedule 40
FE


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2017 4:44 am 
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Right - remember, the whole point is that the pipe flex and conform to the hull shape.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2017 9:00 am 
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Thanks for the replies! I'll stick with the 40.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 9:41 pm 
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Anyone see a problem using 3" solid drain pipe? Seems a little more flexible which would think would be a benefit.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/3-in-x-10-f ... /100185642


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2017 9:54 pm 
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tfs8271 wrote:
Anyone see a problem using 3" solid drain pipe? Seems a little more flexible which would think would be a benefit.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/3-in-x-10-f ... /100185642


It's really just two layers of very thin PVC. I've used it for my shop dust collection and would guess that it's a little too flexible and not strong enough to withstand collapsing under the weight of a PA going down the road. It might work but I wouldn't trust it with my expensive yak.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 1:07 am 
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sher715 wrote:
tfs8271 wrote:
Anyone see a problem using 3" solid drain pipe? Seems a little more flexible which would think would be a benefit.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/3-in-x-10-f ... /100185642


It's really just two layers of very thin PVC. I've used it for my shop dust collection and would guess that it's a little too flexible and not strong enough to withstand collapsing under the weight of a PA going down the road. It might work but I wouldn't trust it with my expensive yak.


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Okay, good to know. I'm just using them on the rack I'm building for storing in the garage. I'll take that into consideration when building the trailer. Thanks.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 12:53 pm 
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As a plumbing contractor and PA owner I would say to use 3" thinwall drainage pvc. Right diameter, and Plenty tough with a little bit of "give" against the polyethylene.

Also, heat and bend the "ramp" instead of using fittings whose hubs interrupt a smooth transition and have sharp edges.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 1:45 pm 
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I just finished my low profile cart for moving PA14 in and out of the garage. Very pleased with the results. Although, I will need to add two rigid length wise supports (~68" - 1"X3") to keep perpendicular supports from rotating.


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