Return to Hobie.com
Hobie Forums
It is currently Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:52 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2007 10:02 pm 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2987
Location: Escondido
There has been a lot written about this topic, yet the question keeps appearing, mostly from those trying to make the choice. Having spent hundreds of hours in the Adventure and about 15 to 20 in the Revolution, I've had the good fortune to compare them with regard to speed, sailing, wake riding and side by side general handling characteristics. Of course, this is just one person's observations.

First differences: The Adventure is unique among all the Hobie kayaks in two respects. 1) It's the only one that has the capability for using the dagger-board (for sailing); and 2) It contains the built in hardware (2007 models and up) to be optionally converted to the Island sailing trimaran. Aside from that, The Adventure sits a little lower in the water. It weighs 4# more. Although they both are rated at 350# total carrying capacity, I am convinced that the Revo has more "reserve" capacity beyond that than the Adventure.

Hull: They look similar, but three factors provide very different handling between the two. Length, "rocker" and rudder placement make all the difference, as we shall see. Briefly, the Revo is about 2 1/2 feet shorter (1" wider), has a moderate amount of rocker (Adventure has virtually none) and the rudder is mounted slightly lower in the water.

Cockpit and deck plan: The Adventure has a slightly longer and wider cockpit. It has two drink holders, both of which fully drain. With the longer bow, you can stow the paddle halves in the forward hatch. Only problem, you can't get to the forward hatch while underway without leaving the cockpit.

The Revo feels a little more cozy. There is only one drink holder which annoyingly does not drain fully and is so shallow that small bottled waters are always flopping out, forcing you to store them behind the seat area. Although you cannot fit the paddle in the forward hatch, you can access it fairly easily from the cockpit while underway.

On the water:

Stability: They both have very good stability, with primary stability being about equal but a slight edge to the Revo in secondary stability. This is not a critical issue by any means.

Turning: A big nod to the Revo here. It turns like a sports car while the Adventure turns like the Titanic by comparison. Like most kayaks, the Revo can accomplish minor course corrections simply by leaning away from the direction you want to turn. This doesn't work out quite so well with the Adventure -- you can lean till you fall out before any turning happens. The sailing rudder helps them both (and is recommended as an automatic upgrade), but much more so for the Adventure. It is practically a must for sailing and wake riding for either boat and will add a lot of sizzle to any handling situation.

Paddling: They are both decent paddlers. The Adventure obviously tracks a little bit better, but the Revo is more sensitive to turning cues.

Speed: For me, the Adventure sprints (with Turbofins) about .6 or .7 MPH faster. A much more realistic figure though is cruise speed, where the difference narrows to about .3 to .4 MPH on a "high speed cruise" to about .2 to .3 MPH on a casual cruise. This all assumes flat water and light wind.

Wind and chop: Both of the boats are very seaworthy. But there is a noticeable difference between the two in the manner that they behave in weather. The Adventure handles wind and chop with great ease -- it just cuts through it as if it were a minor annoyance. As a result, it is easier to go against weather, although you'll likely have a wetter ride in larger chop. The Revo has more buoyancy in the bow and tends to ride over the chop or pound against it. Next to the Adventure (which is in a class by itself here) the Revo is the next best in the Hobie line at handling weather and I would rate it as very good. You'll also come out drier with chop, especially on the beam.

A by-product of this is that the Adventure is faster in weather, so it has a greater range and is more comfortable in foul weather or unfriendly winds.

Upwind in small chop, the Adventure is very quiet, whereas the Revo experiences a little hull slap. Side by side, this difference is quite noticeable.

Sailing: Both boats are lively and exciting to sail, although the majority would consider it a secondary activity -- most sailboats are faster (unless there's no wind). The Revo has the better sailing manners -- it has a better sheeting angle on the sail and its secondary stability and wider beam make it a little more stable. You can also "hike out" a bit more. On the other hand, It's easy to modify the sheeting angle on the Adventure, and it accepts the dagger-board for better upwind performance. The dagger-board also adds a stability factor to the Adventure that makes the handling of gusts and wind changes much easier than without.

For those who like to sail without all the excitement, the Sidekick (outrigger kit) makes for very stable sailing.

Boat wake rides: (I don't think anybody really does these but me). This is an exciting and fun activity when you didn't bring your sail or there is no wind. You need ST or preferably Turbofins and a sailing rudder for either boat. Both boats can do it, but the Revolution will give you a better ride. Shorter, with a more buoyant bow and a more responsive helm, it's more likely to get on the swells rather than span them.

Overall feeling: This is a bit risky, but I would characterize the Revolution as akin to a sports car or Steerman bi-plane -- fun, willing and playful. The Adventure by comparison, is more like a Cadillac or jet fighter -- smooth and deliberate.

So as you can see, they don't look that much different, but as you get to know them, the more subtle differences offer each advantages in different ways. 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2007 9:31 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 21
Location: Houston, TX
Thanks for the great writeup Roadrunner. That's the exact comparison I've been waiting to see. Are you fortunate enough to own both an Adventure and a Revolution?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2007 10:46 pm 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2987
Location: Escondido
The local dealer, lacking sufficient space for his demonstration fleet, has been storing some of his boats at my place. In exchange, he lets me use them when available. It's kinda like having keys to the toy store!

I love my Adventure, but have certainly enjoyed his Revolution on many occasions! Guess you could say I'm pretty fortunate! :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2018 9:00 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2018 8:08 am
Posts: 22
Location: Quebec
Thank you!! Great post!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:55 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Mon Jun 17, 2013 5:25 pm
Posts: 387
Location: Jaco, Costa Rica
Roadrunner wrote:

Stability: They both have very good stability, with primary stability being about equal but a slight edge to the Revo in secondary stability. This is not a critical issue by any means.



I think you got this backwards and from your further comments mean Adventure has slight edge in secondary stability.

_________________
Mark
Tandem Island- 2013
2 - Sports - 2014


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 6:54 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 1:27 pm
Posts: 79
Thanks, very interesting Roadrunner.

Just to be clear, your comparison is with the Revolution 16 with the Adventure, I assume. I seem to remember you comparing the Revo 13 and Revo 16 in one of your posts somewhere... that might be nice to include in this thread.

Also, what model year Adventure are you comparing? I assume the AI-1 hull vs AI-2 would be quite different...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 8:21 pm 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2987
Location: Escondido
Let me clarify some nomenclature and bring this comparison up to date. When the comparison was posted 11 years ago, the Revolution 13 was brand new and was the only "Revolution" -- it was known simply as the Revolution. The current Revolution 16 was in its second year of production and was called "Adventure" then. The AI 1 was on the verge of being introduced. Both boats were powered by what is now called the V-1 Drive, and Turbofins were available and used in the comparison. So this comparison, in current terms is the Revo 16 vs the Revo 13.

The hulls have obviously stood the test of time and have not changed -- a testiment to suburb design IMO. The performance part of the comparison is still valid today. Cockpits, however,have been refined more than once. One of the big differences is the Vantage seat since 2015. This may or may not have an effect on the CG compared with the older models tested. Several other less noticeable improvements in various systems, like the Twist and Stow rudder, Click N go Drive fastening system, etc. etc. have refined the boats in terms of reliability, durability and ergonomics rather than performance. Finally, the Mirage Drive is now the MD 180. This affects performance obviously by having the reverse feature, but also affects acceleration and speed range performance to a small degree.

I nave not sat in either boat with the Vantage seat. In the stability comparison, based on the old seats, the Revo (13) had slightly better secondary stability. In rough seas this is an advantage because beam swells cause less of a rolling moment,making the boat more controllable. Those who have compared these boats more recently would have a better idea if this is still true (I would guess so unless there was a change in seat height differential).

The AI-1 shared the same hull as the Adventure and was called the "Adventure Island". That Adventure was upgradable in 2007. The AI 2 (not involved in this comparison) is loosely based on the AI 1, but significantly modified. It is not found in the present Revolution series.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 8:30 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 2:25 pm
Posts: 2809
Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
recycle wrote:
Thanks, very interesting Roadrunner.

Just to be clear, your comparison is with the Revolution 16 with the Adventure, I assume. I seem to remember you comparing the Revo 13 and Revo 16 in one of your posts somewhere... that might be nice to include in this thread.

Also, what model year Adventure are you comparing? I assume the AI-1 hull vs AI-2 would be quite different...


Recycle,
Roadrunner will probably chime in but this is an old post from 2007. Back then there was only the Revo 13 and the Adventure ( now Revo 16).
Also, whilst the AIv1 was based on the Adventure hull, the AIv2 has its own unique hull that was never available as a kayak only and is very different from the original Adventure hull, being larger, longer and heavier with a built in daggerboard.

Edit: oops, too late, I see RR has posted whilst I was composing this post!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 9:00 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Mon Jun 17, 2013 5:25 pm
Posts: 387
Location: Jaco, Costa Rica
Whoops, didn't see the thread date.

_________________
Mark
Tandem Island- 2013
2 - Sports - 2014


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 12:30 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Wed May 11, 2016 1:27 am
Posts: 442
Roadrunner wrote:
Cockpits, however,have been refined more than once. One of the big differences is the Vantage seat since 2015. This may or may not have an effect on the CG compared with the older models tested. .


I feel the vantage seat in the revo 16 compared to the old hull actually helps to edge or lean it slightly better, due to the ability to shift your weight more, which helps the secondary stability aspect a tad. COG is slightly higher but not much. Against this the better back support allows you to lower your torso by improved reclining support if necessary. Helps in following seas and beach landings by shifting weight backwards also.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 8:31 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 1:27 pm
Posts: 79
Whoops... missed the thread's original date too. Now it all makes more sense. Appreciate the updated commentary though!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
© Hobie Cat Company. All rights reserved.
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group