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PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2020 7:56 am 
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Location: Near Austin, TX
Tried finding this here and on the interwebs but haven't. I'm kind of baffled that Hobie didn't make these MD chain/cable connections stronger. As they are (V2's/GTs) they are merely crimped (chain side female socket with cable end inserted). I've used silver solder, MAPP gas torch, and flux to solder SS (specifically thermocouples inside thin-walled SS tubing). I'm considering having a go at a repair, only challenges I see are two: 1. I need to get the braided SS cable inserted back into the female feral (done, as I used a Dremel diamond bit just a little smaller in diameter to bore out the female end more). 2. Get enough heat (430F) to the base end of the chain feral to get the silver solder to wick w/o too much damage to the Teflon sheath covering the cable. I think if I file down about 1/16" off the feral (provide a 1/16" gap between the top of the feral and end of sheath) and have the cable submerged and held in water up as far as possible, I can get this done. Oh, of course I will also re-crimp the union before silver soldering.

So why? Was this done by design to allow failure so other more expensive components don't fail, or to allow failure to sell very expensive SS chain/cables, or both?

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Roy Niswanger


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2020 5:26 pm 
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A failure of this kind is quite rare, I would think, and would have been a bad roller swage job.

This should be covered by warranty as it is clearly defective.

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Matt Miller
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Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2020 2:03 pm 
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mmiller wrote:
A failure of this kind is quite rare, I would think, and would have been a bad roller swage job.

This should be covered by warranty as it is clearly defective.


Well Matt, a free replacement would be great, just need to follow a process right?

In the meantime, I repaired it on my own:



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Roy Niswanger


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2020 2:37 pm 
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Have your dealer file a claim. Will be interested to see how that holds up!

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Matt Miller
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Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2020 3:38 pm 
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mmiller wrote:
Have your dealer file a claim. Will be interested to see how that holds up!


Me too! After I crimped it, I put the chain end in my vice (padded with wood blocks) and yanked pretty damn hard. So with the new (albeit not as good as factory) crimp and the silver bearing solder job and installing now with correct load/tension, it will be interesting to see how long it holds up. I will let you all know.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2020 2:42 pm 
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Uggg, fix didn't last but about 20 mins of pedaling! Just filed a claim with ACK.

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Roy Niswanger


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2020 10:05 pm 
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Roy, after chuckling, I give you an "A" for effort!

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2020 8:31 am 
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A failure of this kind is quite rare, I would think, and would have been a bad roller swage job.

This should be covered by warranty as it is clearly defective.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2020 9:32 am 
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Dr.SteelheadCatcher wrote:
Roy, after chuckling, I give you an "A" for effort!


Making others laugh is fine, making oneself laugh is mostly the goal, I do laugh at myself a fair amount :) I think I needed more heat to the twisted cable, not much if any silver solder flow.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2020 9:34 am 
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jackstaygnat wrote:
A failure of this kind is quite rare, I would think, and would have been a bad roller swage job.

This should be covered by warranty as it is clearly defective.


Interesting, as a first post too, to basically quote what Matt Miller said? Also interesting you registered a couple of months back and this is your first post. Thanks for stopping by to chime in.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 4:50 am 
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Location: Denmark, Europe
Hi niswanger,

I think you are right! Looking at the teflon coat on the cable, it doesn't look like you have had enough heat on the steel wire. It needs to be glowing red, and then the teflon will be burning in the end.

I have tried a similar exercise, using a grub screw instead of the thread (in opposite end of the chain). I drilled out the hex shape and soldered the wire down there. Afterwards I filed the screw, until it had the shape to go into the slot in the drum. It worked for a long time. :)


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2021 4:08 pm 
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As to why they crimp and not solder, that's pretty simple. Design for manufacture. If a crimp holds, it fast and easy. perfect for keeping manufacturing costs down.

Same reason why rivets are often used instead of nuts and bolts. Speed.


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