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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 12:32 pm 
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I have an old Hobie 16 I just bought. The boltrope is frayed or torn in certain areas and getting the sail all the way up is a pain in the... I will try the suggested fixes of cleaning the track, loosening the battens, lubricating the boltrope and swearing more creatively. I wonder, however, about discarding the use of the boltrope and/or attaching sail slugs along it instead? I have a 26' Clippermarine (please don't laugh) that uses this and that sail is a piece of cake to raise. I realize that I'll lose a bit of wind to the gap between the luff and the mast but honestly, I think I can spare that. Will other kids on the Hobie playground make fun of me for doing this? Are there any downsides other than what I mentioned? Has anyone already done this?
thanks for the advice and feedback!
mark.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 6:29 pm 
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i'd say get the sail fixed proper. Yer goona lose too much in the shape of the sail to make it worth it. No way you get enough downhaul to keep the sail shaped properly. on the other end, would you run out of room on the Boom? depending on what you would get, those would add at least an inch if not up to 2 to the foot of the sail. then there is the cost of the slugs, grommets, and reinforcement around the grommetts. Woud be diff i think if the sail were both cut for them, and structured for them. just my opinion. others?


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 8:16 am 
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markporter wrote:
getting the sail all the way up is a pain in the...


All Hobie 16s are hard to hoist the final 3-4 feet. That is due to the large luff curve trying to slide up a straight track. The sail always starts catching at the feeder if you pull too hard on the halyard without pre-feeding at the opening.



Sail hoist technique is at about the 8 minute mark.

mmiller wrote:
Raising the mainsail of a Hobie can be more difficult than need be.

Several factors can cause the mainsail to be difficult to hoist:


Dirty luff ropes and luff tracks. These can be cleaned with soapy water and a scrub brush. If you want to use a lubricant, keep away from oils and waxes that can attract dirt. Use a dry silicone spray. Most all Hobie sails now have a Teflon threaded bolt (luff) rope to ease the hoisting effort.

Battens and sail shape. The battens stiffen the airfoil shape of your sail. Over tensioning of the battens can cause a couple of problems. Luff protector caps can be forced against the mast and cause drag when hoisting. The battens also force the sail shape into a curve. The luff curve (seen when laying the sail out on the ground, as a large arch) is typical to Hobie Cat main sails. The sails "airfoil" shape is mostly created by the miss-matched mast bend and luff curve of the sail. The luff curve is more than the likely mast bend and when the mast is straight (while hoisting) the difference is dramatic. This luff curve going up the straight mast can cause significant drag and hoisting problems when done incorrectly.

Outhaul. Be sure the outhaul is fully released before hoisting.

Hoist Technique:

Keep the batten tension to a minimum. Hoist the sail slowly, while feeding into the mast opening. When the sail gets about 3/4's of the way up, begin aggressively feeding at the bottom opening and reduce the amount of halyard effort. If the halyard is pulled tight when the sail is not being fed into and up the track, you will have problems. The sail luff will pull taunt and the curve shape will bind in the (straight) mast track. Lower the sail slightly and begin feeding again.

The best way to feed the sail is to stand in front of the mast and reach around either side to "sandwich" the sail between two hands (above the feeder opening) and push the sail up the track. Pull with the halyard, only the slack created, then feed again. If the sail binds, lower slightly and begin feeding again. This technique can be done by one person, but is certainly easier with two working together. It is VERY important that the person on the halyard only pulls the slack up the mast and does not get ahead of the feeder.

Locking the Hobie 14/16/Getaway halyard:

Once the sail is fully hoisted (be sure that the sail is fully inserted into the feeder). Pull the halyard forward of the mast by 3-4 feet. Hold the halyard on the centerline of the mast. Pull hard and hold the tension while bringing the halyard into the mast. Release the halyard tension and see that the sail remains fully hoisted. This seats a small bead, in the halyard, under a two finger prong "hook" and the top of the mast. If the sail slips down when downhaul tension is added, repeat the final hoist technique again. Be sure the bead is clear to pass the hook before pulling tension on the halyard.

Image

To release... fully release the downhaul and outhaul. Partially feed the sail up the luff track. Hoist with the halyard to the top till it stops, hold... pull the halyard line forward 3-4 feet away from the mast, ease the halyard to lower the sail.

Locking the Hobie 17/18/20/21 Halyard:

It is best to simulate the halyard locking with the mast down so you clearly understand the system.

Then, depending on how old the boat is, be sure the hook does not have the old "flopper" stainless piece hanging on the hook. This old device caused difficulty in raising and hooking but would make it easier to release and lower.

Also, be sure that the knot tied to the ring is very low profile. A long bowline knot will hit the mast head before the ring gets to the hook.

If the ring has a small loop at the top... The line should be passed through the loop and a small knot tied. The knot (when ring and shackle are affixed to the sail) should be facing the mast. This tilts the ring closer to the mast.

Image

Then (before attaching halyard shackle to the sail) spin the halyard 3 or 4 times clockwise (looking down on the shackle). This "pre-loads" the halyard line and causes the ring to swing back towards the hook. Keep the boat into the wind and hoist. Should lock easily.

To release... fully release the downhaul and outhaul. Partially feed the sail up the luff track. Hoist with the halyard to the top till it stops, hold... rotate the aft of the mast base to starboard, hold the mast rotated, ease the halyard a few feet before releasing the mast. Lower the sail.

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Warranty and Technical Support
Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 8:38 am 
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Thanks Matt! I caught your video previously, thanks, it was a great refresher on Hobie 16 setup! The only way we could possibly get the sail up is by pre-feeding, pushing up on the last two battens. But the last 12-16" are unbelievably difficult and next to impossible to do on the water (I'm on a lake, no beach). We may need to try this feed horizontally and actually look for binding points and clean the mast slot thoroughly. I saw one post about putting some Dawn on the track/boltrope each time, seems like a messy way. I do have the dry lube to try as well. The bolt rope is torn in several places so, one way or another, I'm gonna need to get the sail repaired.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 10:19 am 
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Other thoughts... outhaul off and be sure the mainsheet blocks are totally slack... and the boat has to be head-to-wind for sure. No wind loads on the sails.

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Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Warranty and Technical Support
Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 10:22 am 
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I had similar problems on an 1983 H16.
The problem was found to be due to a swollen bolt rope in the foot of the sail that was binding in the boom even after releasing the outhaul this tended to pull the luft bolt rope against the mast track causing the last foot or two to become a real pita to raise.

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Hobie 14 Turbo (~1979)
Hobie 16 Carumba (1983)
Hobie 16 1990 (storm damaged)
Hobie 16 1996 (my latest)


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 10:54 am 
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So, you had the bolt rope replaced and that resolved the issue?

:
paragon1970 wrote:
I had similar problems on an 1983 H16.
The problem was found to be due to a swollen bolt rope in the foot of the sail that was binding in the boom even after releasing the outhaul this tended to pull the luft bolt rope against the mast track causing the last foot or two to become a real pita to raise.


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