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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 3:58 am 
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Location: California
Hello! New to the forum but not entirely new to Hobie. I've used a handful of their kayaks and sailed on a Wave once.

I currently own a 14' day-sailer, aka a sailing dinghy, but I find that I just don't use it very much. It's just too much work, what with all the jumping around the cockpit, hiking-out, and general gymnastics involved in keeping everything going and upright.. :P I'm not all that flexible, and my back has issues that are exacerbated by the stress and strain of dinghy sailing. Sitting in a kayak never hurt, though.

After watching multiple YT videos for the AI and TI, I'm thinking it sounds like a lot more fun to sail and lot easier, stable, and forgiving to use. It looks a lot more comfortable, too!
I especially like how you can furl the main when you want to de-power the rig. Having a hands-free propulsion system is nice, too.

My concern, having zero interest in fishing with it, is that it might not work so well as a true sailboat as I might like. Having a headsail and mainsail working together, as I do on my boat, really helps when sailing upwind, and my boat points pretty darn high; a trait I've heard the AI doesn't possess. And understandably, given the shape of the sail, vertical battens, and lack of a boom or jib.

So how high do they point? It's hard to see in the videos what direction the wind is coming from, so it's difficult to tell exactly what point of sail they're on.
I don't imagine you can sail one close-hauled very well, but can they manage at least a close-reach? Can they make decent headway when sailing upwind, or will I spend all my time tacking with the boat very nearly on a beam-reach?

I want a small boat that's easy to store and goes faster without having to hike-out. I've always like multihull boats, trimarans especially, so I'm hoping you 'guys' will convince me this is the perfect boat for me. :D

Thanks!

TD


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 8:48 am 
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If you're looking for sophisticated performance in a sailboat, the TI is going to disappoint. It's a very simple design developed primarily for easy, no-hassle day sailing close to shore in fair weather conditions. Ease of use is its strength, it's not a performance sailboat by any means. Upwind performance is not great. Just one look at its configuration should tell a seasoned sailor everything he needs to know. Close-reach is doable as long as you're in no hurry going upwind, close-hauled performance is poor. Low wind performance is middling, you can buy an accessory spinnaker but if you want a jib you'll have to try to rig one of your own.

It's best for simple pleasure sailing, not destination, sport, or speed sailing.

But, if you simply want to get out on the water and have a very pleasant day sailing around the bay or harbor without the hassle of a larger sailboat, you can't beat it. Very few sailboats are easier to set up and sail than the TI.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
Posts: 14075
Location: Oceanside, California
The Islands are just about the most versatile sailing boat out there. They are pretty quick compared to a small dinghy. I think the best entry level boat as you can pedal and only open as much sail as you can handle, as you learn. You can use them in just about any condition from zero wind (you can pedal) to higher winds (you can furl the sail partially / reef).

You can point higher by pedaling, but 45 degrees is a likely pointing angle.

Stable, comfortable. You don't have to hike. Also very forgiving.

Lots of fun!

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Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 4:06 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
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Location: High Point, NC
The Islands sail just fine. While they aren't likely to compare in terms of speed to most multi-hull sailboats, they'll keep pace with, or even outpace, most mono-hulls. You will give up a boom, so downwind sailing requires that you stay up on the wind a bit (just like you'd do with most any modern multi-hull) and you don't have a jib. But, you do have a mirage drive so tacking is not a problem whatsoever. You also have a furling mainsail so you can stay out when most others are driven to the parking lot. If the wind dies, you can still motivate. You can get into waters that most other boats can't and go from parking lot to water in less than 15 minutes.

So, you're going to give up a few things but will be gaining a good deal more. Just depends on what you want to do with your boat.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 6:12 pm 
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Location: California
The videos I watched, the ones that I liked the most, were the ones where the wind speeds were in the 15 - 25 knot range. A wet, rough ride to be sure, but super fun too! In the summer where I sail, there's no shortage of strong wind, especially in the afternoon, so that's the sort of conditions I'd be looking at...... I hope. :mrgreen:

There are also a lot of sloughs or creeks and many places to put ashore.

I just have to wait out, and survive, this Covid-19 curse and find someplace to demo one of these things.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 5:37 am 
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I agree with the last 2 posters. Fast set-up and launch, good speed, Mirage Drive, furling main--which I use mainly for the launch and return to shore. Much more stable than flying in slightly out of control. My suggestion would be to buy the Tandem---seems to sail better, extra seat, easy to operate from rear seat.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:35 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2014 6:43 am
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Location: Chalfont Pa
This topic has been addressed many times. Crude rig, limited pointing, non planing hull, etc. Easy to setup, low energy to sail, unless you use the mirage drives, "backwards tiller", etc.
Bottom line, sail one and see. I knew in 15 minutes it was right. Makes you a better sailor to sail this one well, and it does so much as a boat.

Just got back from 3 weeks of camping,biking, boating in FL. Used it as a kayak to explore back bays, sailed and explored. Draw a crowd at every campsite, and probably made a few new owners out of some.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 12:50 pm 
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Location: California
Thanks for the replies. As soon as this SiP thing is behind us, and I can find a place giving demos, I plan to try one out.

I found a 2011 AI on my local CL last week for $2,000, but now seems like a bad time to go visiting strangers and getting close.

Also, from what I've read, it sounds like the 2015 and newer is the way to go.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 4:01 pm 
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Location: Colorado
I will add.. If the idea of the mirage drive pedals appeal to you, these are just absolutely great sailing craft.

This video show a sailing application that is perfect for the TI.. We sailed, pedal sailed, beached, hiked, had destinations, motored (necessary to do this water hike in one day). This trip was just a little over a month ago.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vKlz2y6kno


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:33 pm 
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They just let you do a lot of different stuff with very little trouble - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xr_c2chP1jc


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 8:50 pm 
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Location: Southwest Florida
Yes, the Adventure Island makes a good sailboat.

I have had the following sailboats, in this order. Chrysler Mutineer, Mcgreggor 26, Seaward 23, Montgomery 15, and American 18. All of these had their good points and all had some short comings. The Adventure Island does not point higher than 45 degrees, if that. It does not sail dead downwind at all. But I never liked to sail dead downwind in any of the above boats anyways.

Two months ago I sold the American 18, and also traded in a Hobie Compass for a bright red Adventure Island. I am 69 years old and and find the AI easy to sail. 5 to 10 mph winds is a day of leisurely enjoyment. 10 to 15 mph winds provides a great day of sailing. WOW, 15 to 22 mph winds on two outings proved that the Adventure Island is a great sailboat. Easy to furl even without heading up to the wind. I live on a large lake in Southwest Florida. I have no problem sailing anywhere on the lake so the pointing and downwind issues are not a big deal. The boat keeps you dry up to 12mph winds. The day gust reached 22mph I was soaked from head to toe. Made a purchase from Gill sailing apparel the next day.

I keep the boat in the water at my dock for a few days at a time if wind is in the forecast. I then breakdown the boat at the dock to reduce the weight down to the kayak only so I can easily pull the kayak onto the dock. Then hobie cart the kayak to my garage. I carry the amas and sail separately, as I find three short trips from the dock to the garage is easier than dealing with a heavier boat.

Homeowners around the lake are asking around trying to find out who owns the beautiful bright red sailboat that has been zipping around the lake. Yes it is that fast.

So to answer your question, this is my sixth sailboat. This is a great sailboat for what I want from a sailboat.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 9:04 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2015 6:38 pm
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Location: Pennsylvania - Philly Area
The TI (and AI) are fun to sail.

I have owned both but prefer the TI - bit faster. Does a bit better in offshore settings.

As for pointing into the wind....not a strength ..... I use an outboard for moving up wind and up currents.

Best wind range 15-20 knots - fast wet ride.

See video here: https://youtu.be/wak_OWgDVqw?t=2219

Still hoping Hobie upgrades the Islands in the near future. https://www.hobie.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=63495

See over 50 more videos on youtube challenge - enjoy.

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Jim
Hobie TI 2016 - Offshore rig - Outboard
Hobie Kona 2014
Hobie AI 2015 - sold
Hobie Rev 13 2014 - sold
Hobie Outback - 2008 - sold


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 5:11 am 
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powersjr2 wrote:
I have owned both but prefer the TI - bit faster. Does a bit better in offshore settings..


Really? The bigger of the two is faster? I wouldn't have thought that to be the case. Does the TI have more sail area?

Invader69 wrote:
The Adventure Island does not point higher than 45 degrees, if that. It does not sail dead downwind at all. .


Why not? Can't you sheet out the main far enough to effectively turn it into a spinnaker and pull you downwind?

The first time I saw an AI or TI, I figured it wouldn't be good upwind, but it surprises me to hear it also isn't good downwind.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 6:57 am 
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Location: Chalfont Pa
The longer the waterline the faster the boat, unless foils or a planing hull are in the equation. So the single will accelerate faster, as it is lighter and has less drag but the top speed is lower.
They suck downwind because the sail turns into a "taco" as there is no boom to hold it out. So in effect the sail area is much less. Several fixes are common, barber hauler setups, flex booms, and my favorite is a notch in the paddle to hold the clew out.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:22 am 
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TechD45 wrote:
powersjr2 wrote:
I have owned both but prefer the TI - bit faster. Does a bit better in offshore settings..


Really? The bigger of the two is faster? I wouldn't have thought that to be the case. Does the TI have more sail area?

Invader69 wrote:
The Adventure Island does not point higher than 45 degrees, if that. It does not sail dead downwind at all. .


Why not? Can't you sheet out the main far enough to effectively turn it into a spinnaker and pull you downwind?

The first time I saw an AI or TI, I figured it wouldn't be good upwind, but it surprises me to hear it also isn't good downwind.

I sail my TI downwind a lot, in a broad reach and even running, if not directly downwind. It's a bit tricky managing the sail at times but in fact, it sails so quickly, calmly and quietly in this direction that when I first got it I used to sail for hours downwind and then need to spend double or triple the time tacking back upwind. This sometimes got me into trouble until I learned that downwind sailing has to be carefully mitigated in a sailboat that has limited upwind performance.

This is one of the reasons that I now always recommend that TI buyers consider adding a small gas or electric motor. This makes up for any deficiencies in the TI's ability to destination sail practically. With a motor, you can confidently sail for hours in any direction knowing that if you need to return upwind or if the wind dies, you can easily and timely return to your launch point. A motor is also highly useful in getting out of dangerous situations such as sudden storms or very heavy winds which can overwhelm both the sail and the pedals. I've been in this situation several times. I, personally, would no longer sail my TI without a motor because I like to sail many hours away from shore in all directions, in deep waters, and in potentially unpredictable conditions. With a motor, I always have a high degree of confidence that if sailing conditions become untenable, I have the means to return quickly and safely.

A motor also gives you the ability to return to shore in the event of a rudder failure.


Last edited by pro10is on Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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