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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 9:44 am 
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pro10is wrote:
This sometimes got me into trouble until I learned that downwind sailing has to be carefully mitigated in a sailboat that has limited upwind performance.


Actually a basic rule for all sailboats... sail upwind first... sail home reaching or running.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 8:15 pm 
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mmiller wrote:
pro10is wrote:
This sometimes got me into trouble until I learned that downwind sailing has to be carefully mitigated in a sailboat that has limited upwind performance.


Actually a basic rule for all sailboats... sail upwind first... sail home reaching or running.


Yup. That's the only way to do it where I sail, so it's not even an option to do it any other way, even if I wanted to (why would I want to?).


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2020 5:26 am 
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TechD45 wrote:
mmiller wrote:
pro10is wrote:
This sometimes got me into trouble until I learned that downwind sailing has to be carefully mitigated in a sailboat that has limited upwind performance.


Actually a basic rule for all sailboats... sail upwind first... sail home reaching or running.


Yup. That's the only way to do it where I sail, so it's not even an option to do it any other way, even if I wanted to (why would I want to?).

As typical with rules, some we're meant to be broken. You don't always have the option to sail upwind first. It greatly depends on your intentions.

This is the difference between simple pleasure sailing, where you sail where the winds are optimal on that day and time, and destination sailing where you're trying to reach a specific destination regardless of the optimal wind direction. Both are legitimate.

With destination sailing, you may need to sail downwind first. Once you're experienced, you'll take into account the increased time it takes to sail back upwind.

This is not to mention the common situation where the wind direction may change during your sail. So no simple rule applies to every situation.

Unless you're a die-hard sailor, and few die-hard sailors would likely choose a TI, it's good to have a small motor for the TI, this way you can safely sail/motor wherever you want whenever you want. For my purposes, that is essential. It's all up to you and what your intentions are for your purposes.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2020 7:56 pm 
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Agree with pro10is thoughts.

The TI is just a so so sailboat from a purest point of view especially up wind (a fate of many multi hulls, unless you can stick blades in the water). Downwind ...not the best...

Still hoping for an updated TI from Hobie....add bowsprit with a roller reffing jib.... Switch the sail plan to a main with a roller boom reefing.... Have but I do not use the Hobie TI spinnaker sail much .. still need to add the extra height mast topper....but still feel the halyard lines interfere too much with the main sail....plus adds too much stress on the mast receiver bolt and stress the bottom of the hull (especially in unexpected gust).

When sailing offshore in coastal waters with tides, currents, sailing long distances (30-50 miles in one day) I always sail with my auxiliary outboard motor (in my case 2.5 hp Suzuki 4 stroke). Sailing in small lakes or going 5 miles or less, I sometimes leave the outboard home.....but most of the time I sail with the outboard. Most days the outboard is never used...just there in case I needed.

On days where you run into unfavorable winds, currents, storms, equipment failures....the outboard adds a big safety factor. I now fully count the outboard as part of my emergency equipment. I always check batteries, radio, EPIRB, sail, reefing, life jacket, dry suit, anchor and outboard prior to putting the boat in the water and I also fire up the outboard in the 1st mile of my sail to confirm it is running properly and is ready if needed.

The Hobie TI is a fun versatile sailboat. The combination of sail, peddle, paddle, motor in very shallow waters makes this pleasure to sail.

As with any sailboat....always room for improvement.

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Hobie TI 2016 - Offshore rig - Outboard
Hobie Kona 2014
Hobie AI 2015 - sold
Hobie Rev 13 2014 - sold
Hobie Outback - 2008 - sold


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2020 8:14 am 
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I've been sailing AIs for about 8 years and have no desire to change my choice of boat. It's because there is no easier boat to set up and take down. I really did not understand how important that was going to be to me until the years pass and you sailing interest is not as strong as it was. I don't se any changes in the future..

As far as jibs and extra sails, you can do anything you want with this easily modified boat. I have been sailing my AI with a jib for 6 years. The AI has a bow more suitable for a jib than the TI so keep that in mind when making your choice.

The easiest way to fly a jib is to buy the spinnaker kit and switch out the spinnaker for a jib. Since the mast is flexible you will spill wind off the jib and this will sacrifice so.e power. Still, you gain convenience. One new option I made this year was to create a canvas attachment 1/3 of the way down the mast that allows you to secure the head of the jib to the mast on the fly yet still deploy the jib via the sniffing bag. The jib operates then as a fractional rig. This brings back the power as the mast has less bend the lower down the mast you go. Bottom line is you can do just about anything you want to personalize this boat.

Greg

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2016 AI - Spinn & Jib

“Out of sight of land the sailor feels safe. It is the beach that worries him.”
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 8:29 pm 
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Not to change the topic (too much). Does $2K sound fair for a 2011 with tramps? The condition is listed as "Good", but that can mean anything.

I've been digging around the site for things to check, problems, upgrades, etc... Thing is, given this current SiP we're living under, this really isn't the best time to be buying anything. I'm actually surprised the seller is listing it right now, unless he / she lost their job and needs the cash.
It's also not the greatest time to get up close and personal with strangers. :shock:

I'd like to sell my C-14.2, but no way am I putting it on CL right now. :(


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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 12:13 am 
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Well, I found another 2011, but this one comes with a trailer and dolly for $3,000.
It also has a fish finder and trampolines.

I'm going to have to do a little digging to figure out what I need to ask the seller about the boat's condition.

Wish me luck. :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 7:27 am 
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Location: Chalfont Pa
An extra grand for trailer and tramps sounds like alot. A used trailer for anything can be modified to carry a TI for less. But compare condition to see which is better. A boat that old may have rudder line issues, best to inspect inside to see if all is good. We had a 2012 and upgraded to a newer one with the improved seats and different hull shape which is a hugely better IMHO. The seats keep you dryer, no longer sitting in a puddle and more comfortable. The hull shape gives more flotation in the nose which also keeps you dryer. Older boat shape tended to submarine in a gust, something I have yet to have happen in the new boat.
But ultimately it is your money and decision. The old ones are fun too.


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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 1:32 pm 
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quattroguy wrote:
An extra grand for trailer and tramps sounds like alot. A used trailer for anything can be modified to carry a TI for less. But compare condition to see which is better. A boat that old may have rudder line issues, best to inspect inside to see if all is good. We had a 2012 and upgraded to a newer one with the improved seats and different hull shape which is hugely better IMHO. The seats keep you dryer, no longer sitting in a puddle and more comfortable. The hull shape gives more flotation in the nose which also keeps you dryer. Older boat shape tended to submarine in a gust, something I have yet to have happen in the new boat.
But ultimately it is your money and decision. The old ones are fun too.



Thank you for that detailed response. I am a little concerned about the lower capacity of the older models, as well as the various improvement I've heard about that didn't come out until much later. I'm about 240lbs and have always looked for high capacity kayaks for the same reason. Good to know about the control lines, too.

Having been a kayaker for many years, I'm not overly concerned about getting wet, but then again, sitting in a pool of water all day doesn't sound all that appealing.

The trailer that comes with this particular AI is pretty slick. It has four posts at the corners of the trailer, with a platform on top that holds a Thule storage box and spare parts, like the akas, but the trailer itself is nothing spectacular.

I also found a 2016 AI for $3,500, but it doesn't come with a trailer. Around here, small, used boat trailers go for about $1,000 (That's California for you). :roll:

I do appreciate your input and think maybe I'll wait for something newer to come along.


Last edited by TechD45 on Wed May 20, 2020 9:39 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 5:13 pm 
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vetgam wrote:
Since the mast is flexible you will spill wind off the jib and this will sacrifice so.e power. Still, you gain convenience. One new option I made this year was to create a canvas attachment 1/3 of the way down the mast that allows you to secure the head of the jib to the mast on the fly yet still deploy the jib via the sniffing bag. The jib operates then as a fractional rig. This brings back the power as the mast has less bend the lower down the mast you go. Bottom line is you can do just about anything you want to personalize this boat.

Greg
Greg, do you have any pictures of that canvas attachment you made? That sounds like a good idea. I remember Hobie had an attachment sewed on the original TI sails as I believe they were hoping to add a jib.

Are you going to use that new configuration when you participate in the Texas 200 in a few weeks?

Jim


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2020 10:52 am 
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TechD; I rarely ever post but in this case here are my 2 cents worth. Personally I wouldn't mess with anything older than a 2016. The V-Brace studs are smaller and thus weaker but can be replaced, no vantage seat but replaceable etc...

You stated you don't fish so you can pretty much rig your boat for sail alone, there are many post on this forum to help you out.

I bought my 2016 TI new and frankly it's held up better than I expected. I've sailed in mostly larger vessels >33 ft they were fun in my younger years but now I just day sail, much more enjoyable with no drama. From trailer to sailing takes me 25 minutes and that's not rushing it. It sails just fine for me, yesterday winds were steady at 17KTS gusting to 25KTS a very wet ride indeed and right on the max limits for the TI in my opinion.

A dry suit is mandatory depending on your location.

Don't buy the Hobie TI cover it's crap, cost out the wazoo and only lasted me two years before the sun turned it to dust.

Get the Beach tire dolly, not the standard tire one.

I tired numerous methods of trying to get the Hobie spinnaker to work to my satisfaction, it's a PITA, adds more complexity than it's worth and gets in the way of my fishing.

That said I love my TI, its so damn easy to use, sails adequately, great fishing platform, light weight and best of all she who must be obeyed loves it too.

Cheers,

Nick


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2020 2:30 pm 
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NickW wrote:
TechD; I rarely ever post but in this case here are my 2 cents worth. Personally I wouldn't mess with anything older than a 2016. The V-Brace studs are smaller and thus weaker but can be replaced, no vantage seat but replaceable etc...
A dry suit is mandatory depending on your location.

Don't buy the Hobie TI cover it's crap, cost out the wazoo and only lasted me two years before the sun turned it to dust.


V-Brace? I'm not sure what that is.

Edit: Found it! https://www.hobie.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=66542

Thanks for the tip on the cover. A friend just uses a white tarp that hasn't shown any signs of aging in the last year or so of use.

I'm very lucky where I sail, in that during the summer the water is always around 73 degrees. People routinely jump from their boats, or the dock, just to cool off in the water. :mrgreen: No wet suit required.

I still haven't pulled the trigger on a boat yet, partly because it seems like the AI/TI require a multitude of improvements to make them sail the way their owners want them to. I have to admit, that's a little off-putting. My sailing dinghy required exactly nothing to make it sail precisely the way it should.

It reminds me of when I owned KLR650's (motorcycles). Nice bikes, but in need of multiple mods to make them perform properly.

I'm not sure I want to buy something so expensive that needs so many improvements to make it reliable and efficient.


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